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 Posted:   Jan 5, 2020 - 5:04 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A friend of mine at work reads a Hemingway short story whenever he wants to "steel" himself against a particularly tough situation, like, say a family holiday get together.

I take special pride in this because I was the one who got him The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway for his birthday a few years ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

...nada pues nada...

Hamill, 25-26, a newbie at the Post:

"At about seven-thirty on the morning of July 2, 1961, in his home in Ketchum, Idaho, Ernest Hemingway put a twelve-gauge shotgun under his jaw and pulled the trigger. The news was smothered for most of the morning. I heard the first bulletin early that afternoon, while watching the Dodgers play the Phillies on television. I was shaken to the core. Hemingway was still the great bronze god of American literature, the epitome of the hard-drinking macho artist. But since the day in the navy when I first read Malcolm Cowley's introduction to the Viking collection of Hemingway’s work, he had been one of my heroes. No other word could describe him: his writing, his life, his courage, his drinking, were all part of the heroic image. Suicide was not. Suicide, I believed at the time, was the choice of a coward.

But I had little time to mourn Hemingway or even question his motives. The telephone rang. It was [Editor] Paul Sann.

Get your ass down here, he said. Hemingway knocked himself off, and I want you and Aronowitz to write a series."

"We began working that afternoon in an empty back office. Aronowitz knew almost nothing about Hemingway; I knew almost too much. So we divided the work. I stayed one installment ahead of him, laying out the newspaper clippings, the relevant passages in biographies and monographs, marking passages in Hemingway’s own work that were relevant to the installment. We shared the reporting tasks, calling people all over the country who had known Hemingway. Aronowitz did most of the writing. When he finished each installment, I’d go back over the copy, filling in blanks, cutting statements that seemed ludicrous, trying to separate the myth from the facts. We finished installments near six in the morning, two hours before the deadline.

When it was over, I knew a lot more about writing. Aronowitz was a generous man, showing me what he was doing and why, passing on his hatred of platitude and cliché. And I’d gone more deeply than ever before into Hemingway. I saw his writing mannerisms more clearly, his personal posturing. Some of it was embarrassing. But I had learned that it was possible to be a great writer and an absolute asshole at the same time. None of us knew then how terrible Hemingway’s final years had been and the extent to which alcohol had contributed to his anguished decline. It was right there on the pages. I just didn’t choose to see it."

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 6:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

To paraphrase Chickenhearted: Who is She ?

(I know who she is, do you?)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 6:59 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I've seen that face--that's not Pauline, is it?

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've seen that face--that's not Pauline, is it?

Nope. Far too pretty for that.

I'm not sure if Hemingway ever crossed paths with this her, but she was a muse to many:

Nusch Éluard

http://www.bcn.cat/museupicasso/en/exhibitions/picasso-portraits/personatge/nusch-eluard/

https://www.vogue.it/en/magazine/editor-s-blog/2015/12/dicember-15th

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 10:23 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

The Man Ray muse. Fascinating. I see a photograph...wink

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2020 - 10:31 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Man Ray muse. Fascinating. I see a photograph...wink

I see a film!

I see...a rhinoceros!

Even among Surrealists, Dali was of another plane altogether.

 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2020 - 3:32 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Had my passport renewal photo taken this week.

Hemingway's is better than mine.

...and yours.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2020 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

After over a year since the previous volume, the Letters of Ernest Hemingway Volume 5 is due for publication in July, 2020. I've barely read the first four volumes, but when I do it is always great reading. Many authors' letters are dull affairs--even you, Hunter S. Thompson--but Hemingway's missives are often wonderful, with the tough, caustic humor I appreciate.

https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/literature/literary-texts/letters-ernest-hemingway-19321934-volume-5?format=HB&isbn=9780521897372

"The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Volume 5, spanning 1932 through May 1934, traces the completion and publication of Death in the Afternoon and Winner Take Nothing. During this intensely active period, Hemingway hunts in Arkansas and Wyoming, fishes the waters off Key West and Cuba, revisits Madrid and Paris, and undertakes a long-anticipated African safari. He witnesses transitions at home and abroad: the deepening Great Depression, Prohibition-era rumrunning, revolution in Cuba, and political unrest in Spain. His readership and celebrity continue to expand as he begins writing for the new men's magazine Esquire. As the volume ends, Hemingway has just acquired his beloved boat, Pilar. The letters detail these events as well as his relationships with his family, friends, publishers, critics and literary contemporaries including editor Maxwell Perkins, Archibald MacLeish, John Dos Passos, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Together the letters paint an intimate self-portrait of this multi-faceted, self-confident, energetic artist in his prime.

"Volume 5 provides accurate transcriptions of all located Hemingway letters written from January 1932 to May 1934

"Of the 392 letters, some eighty-five percent are appearing in print for the first time

"Features a scholarly introduction, extensive annotations and editorial apparatus which includes a roster of correspondents, a chronology of the artist's life to reveal his relationships and activities, and maps of the far-flung places that figure in his letters of this period

"Contains over forty images including Hemingway's own drawings and contemporary advertisements as well as photographs and facsimiles of letters"

 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2020 - 6:49 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Here is an excerpt from Hem's letter to his father, dated 6 November 1923:

"All the gang went deer hunting last Friday but not me. The Baby has taken to squawling and is a fine nuisance. I suppose he will yell his head off for the next two or three years. It seems his only entertainment. No one gets as much pleasure out of it as he does."

The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Volume 2 (1923-1925) p. 71.

 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2020 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I don't think I ever mentioned this before, but I could not find the frequently-cited Hemingway quote in which Our Man Papa rages against war. The quote can be found in Ernest Hemingway's introduction to the book, Treasury for the Free World by Ben Raeburn (1946). I played Maxwell Perkins and split up the one-paragraph quote for easier digestion:

"We have waged war in the most ferocious and ruthless way that has ever been waged. We waged it against fierce and ruthless enemies that it was necessary to destroy. Now we have destroyed one of our enemies and forced the capitulation of the other.

"For the moment, we are the strongest power in the world. It is very important that we do not become the most hated….We need to study and understand certain basic problems….and remember that no weapon has ever settled a moral problem. It can impose a solution, but it cannot guarantee it to be a just one.

"An aggressive war is the great crime against everything good in the world. A defensive war, which must necessarily turn aggressive at the earliest moment is the great counter crime….We never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified is not a crime. Ask the infantry and the dead."

 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2020 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The post above apparently got Kev McGann thinking of one of life's tough questions.

https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=139222&forumID=7&archive=0

I had no idea McGann ever even bothered with this little Hemingway topic! I always thought the only ones who read my topics were whoever posted on them.

 
 Posted:   Feb 15, 2020 - 10:02 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A.E. Hotchner, R.I.P.

https://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/writer-ae-hotchner-friend-to-hemingway-newman-dead-at/article_d5abae8c-29f8-5f12-9ce7-d3d0f30126fc.html

 
 Posted:   Feb 22, 2020 - 5:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ernest Hemingway: Rivers to the Sea, the excellent 2005 PBS "American Masters" documentary, is on The 'Tube (in HD):

https://youtu.be/wPwtl9oJJzc

Watch it while it's there, kids.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 22, 2020 - 6:03 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

A.E. Hotchner, R.I.P.

https://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/writer-ae-hotchner-friend-to-hemingway-newman-dead-at/article_d5abae8c-29f8-5f12-9ce7-d3d0f30126fc.html


Greetings, O' Keeper of the Hemingway Flame.

Read the NY Times obit the other workday lunch. Forced me to re-watch Midnight In Paris yet again. Today found HEMINGWAY A LIFE IN PICTURES at library and brought it home. And just confirmed my Great-Great Grandpapa was the U. S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida 1863-69. In Key West. A trip down the peninsula is most definitely in the offing. 'S about time; them cosmic forces are aligning...

 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2020 - 7:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Greetings, O' Keeper of the Hemingway Flame.

Read the NY Times obit the other workday lunch. Forced me to re-watch Midnight In Paris yet again. Today found HEMINGWAY A LIFE IN PICTURES at library and brought it home. And just confirmed my Great-Great Grandpapa was the U. S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida 1863-69. In Key West. A trip down the peninsula is most definitely in the offing. 'S about time; them cosmic forces are aligning...


So yer old grandpappy was a lawyer, eh? Never you fear, Howard, I'm sure you'll live it down and restore the family honor. wink

When you're in Key West make sure to visit Fort Zachary Taylor Park. Best view in Key West, even better than the lighthouse.

https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/fort-zachary-taylor-historic-state-park

If you're passing through Fort Lauderdale way, do drop me a line. Perhaps a Mai Kai summit is in order.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2020 - 9:05 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Watch it, my Dad was a lawyer too. Oh and you mean Mai Tai as in brewed for the evil gods of the volcanoes? I'm in. Had my first one around 19. It was exquisite. Followed by another. OH and G-G-G was assistant to Salmon P. Chase, Sec. of Treasury in Lincoln administration. That's how m'Great Grandma as an infant got to sit on Abe's lap one day. Family legend is that she complained, "You're ugly." eek But that Key West connection--luv it. cool

 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2020 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

No, I mean Mai Kai, though they do serve the Mai Tai:

https://www.maikai.com/menus/tropical-drinks/

A visit will get you back in touch with your Mid-Century Modern roots.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2020 - 7:27 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Guess when we last connected I was in a name-dropping frame of mind. Got another one. Many moons ago when I was fresh out of h.s. my first job was, to keep things a bit anonymous, an entry level position in a Next Customer! environment. It's now 40+ years later and still remember names and faces of regulars. Lots of regulars, names and faces, male and female, young and old. Anyway, the last couple of decades I've seen a name in the newspaper on occasion and always wondered if that was the same guy I'd talked to in the old days. Just a passing thought every time to be quickly dismissed. But a few weeks ago the name kept popping up and this time I went into Google images...and my jaw dropped as in omigod you have got to be kidding me that's him! He looks like an old man now and I'm not far from Medicare m'self but I know that's him. Sonofagun. Anthony Fauci.

We didn't engage in conversation much if at all but we were acquainted. He'd never remember but if I mentioned the workplace it might ring a bell. At best. It's true, that six degrees business.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 6:47 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Have you watched Hemingway and Gellhorn? It was the film that finally convinced me that Nicole Kidman is a great actress. I've also lightened up on ol' Clive Owen, as well. Sure, the movie makes too much use of "Viva La Quince Brigada", but I was long used to the song thanks to Pete Seeger's 1963 Carnegie Hall album.

3+ years later I can now say yup I've seen it. Breathtaking how seamlessly the title characters were woven into old documentary footage a la something like the Zelig way. But for me that was pretty much it. Too much neurosis. It was unrelenting. Had its moments, though.

 
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