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 Posted:   Sep 17, 2019 - 10:30 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Papa's favorite hamburger recipe

https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/ernest-hemingways-favorite-hamburger/

 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2019 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Last night I was leafing through my copy of F. Scott Fitzgerald A to Z: The Essential Refernce to His Life and Work. The entry for Doctor Keene, the character who delivered Benjamin Button inspired me to read Scott's short story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (1922).

The story reveals Fitzgerald to possess a fine sense of humor as well a superb ability to comment on society. With a minimum of detail, Scott creates a vivid image of the street outside the hospital where Benjamin Button is born and the hysterical, comedic reactions of the hospital staff to Button's unique appearance.

I've slagged off Scott in the past, but I have to retract my previous view of his work even though his Zelda fixation will always irritate me.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 12:53 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

"Mr. Hamill is of a generation that believes that a man could learn to be a man by reading Hemingway."
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/style/pete-hamill-brooklyn-book.html

 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2019 - 6:08 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Mr. Hamill is of a generation that believes that a man could learn to be a man by reading Hemingway."
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/style/pete-hamill-brooklyn-book.html


Before I click on that Olde Times link, is the article anything like his "Why Sinatra Matters" or the John Milius quote about how John Ford and John Wayne "taught us to be men"?

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2019 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Steve Canyon! Holy cow I haven't thought of that in at least 50 years and even then it was only for the title drawing in the Sunday NY Daily News funnies. Funnies?! Did I say that? Did YOU say that?? Whoa. Dondi, Gasoline Alley yeah but Steve Canyon! This is amazing.

Here's a Steve Canyon--it's that man again--article you might enjoy:

http://www.tcj.com/for-the-love-of-steve-canyon/

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2019 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

"Mr. Hamill is of a generation that believes that a man could learn to be a man by reading Hemingway."
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/style/pete-hamill-brooklyn-book.html


Before I click on that Olde Times link, is the article anything like his "Why Sinatra Matters" or the John Milius quote about how John Ford and John Wayne "taught us to be men"?


Amazing--"Why Sinatra Matters" is alluded to right after the Hemingway mention. I used to read Breslin all the time in my early Daily News years, never really touched Hamill. Have been well aware of it, never read it but the Times article has me juiced so I'm getting "A Drinking Life" from the library. Man these guys could write film noir, no camera required.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2019 - 5:15 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Steve Canyon! Holy cow I haven't thought of that in at least 50 years and even then it was only for the title drawing in the Sunday NY Daily News funnies. Funnies?! Did I say that? Did YOU say that?? Whoa. Dondi, Gasoline Alley yeah but Steve Canyon! This is amazing.

Here's a Steve Canyon--it's that man again--article you might enjoy:

http://www.tcj.com/for-the-love-of-steve-canyon/


I did!

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2019 - 3:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Before I found that Canyon article about his life-long fan and their over-the-decades-long correspondence, I had no idea it ever happened. Maybe it'll be covered in one of the remaining five volumes of the Steve Canyon hardcovers I have yet to crack open (I'm only on vol. 4).

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2019 - 12:04 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I was hooked instantly from the first page of "A Drinking Life." Have never forgotten Ben Gazzara telling Johnny C what it was like on an early summer evening on the streets of Brooklyn back in the day. Hamill is nailing it something fierce. Only a matter of time before "egg creams" came up and didn't fail to bring a smile. I've had friends who grew up in Brooklyn and as adults made their way into the burb and not one of 'em failed to bring up egg creams. Makes me think too of Martin Sloan, Homewood and a chocolate soda with 3 scoops ("...and it was only a dime...").

 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2019 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Phelps: "Oh, they tore down that Route 66 museum a few years ago. Condemned it. A little late I guess, huh?"

Howard L: "How's that?

Phelps: "A little late for you I mean."

Howard L: "Very late. Very late for me."

[Howard gets up, winces from his bum knee, sticks Phelps with the Mai Kai tab and leaves]

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2019 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

In the immortal words of the delegate from Pennsylvania,
"I like it."

 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2019 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Here's a new release that could be fun to thumb through.

https://amzn.to/2Cev1er

Ernest Hemingway: Artifacts From a Life

"the story of American icon Ernest Hemingway's life through the documents, photographs, and miscellany he kept"


Added to my Christmas wishlist.


...and received.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2019 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Mr. Hamill, reminiscing of something when he was all of 11:

"In 1947, Caniff, as announced, left Terry to another artist, George Wunder, and started Steve Canyon in the Daily Mirror. There was a great burst of publicity. Caniff appeared on the cover of Time. The Mirror did a series of ads building up to the debut of the new strip. I learned that Caniff was Irish-American too, from Ohio; had gone to college; wanted to be an actor; came to New York to work for the Associated Press, where he drew a strip called Dickie Dare, and went on to do Terry in 1934 for the Daily News. He was syndicated in more than four hundred newspapers and now lived in a beautiful house in New City, New York. The photographs of the studio showed a room that was larger than our entire flat. I saved all this publicity, starting at Caniff's face, looking at examples of his work going back to childhood, and then, from the first great Sunday page, clipped every Canyon strip until I went into the navy in 1952."

"That first Sunday page of Steve Canyon dated January 18, 1947, was as good as any movie. For five panels, we don't see Canyon's face, but his character is established by various people who greet him on his way into an office building. An Irish cop thanks him for stopping off to see his sister in Shannon; the doorman thanks him for sending a souvenir from Egypt to his son; a blind newsdealer, called only 'sarge,' and obviously a war veteran, thanks Canyon for backing him up in setting up the newsstand; a flower girl offers him a carnation for his buttonhole, but when he turns her down he says that she and her mother are due for a movie on him; the elevator girls stammer a hello and say that for him, they won't wait for a full car. So we know immediately that Canyon is a good, generous man, a world traveler, thoughtful, personal, attractive to women. We see his face for the first time in the sixth panel; it's lean, and there's a black streak in his blond hair. Wearing a checkered overcoat. he opens the door with his company's name on the glass: Horizons Unlimited....In the final panel, Copper Calhoun, with sleek black hair, the arched eyebrows of the Dragon Lady, a long cigarette in one hand, says: 'I want that man!!...Get him!'"

"I loved this and sat down to labor over a long letter to Caniff, telling him how great it was and how I wanted to be cartoonist too. A few weeks later a package arrived in the mail from New City. Inside was a note from Caniff himself, a copy of a brochure he'd written for aspiring cartoonists, 'A Guide for an Armchair Marco Polo,' and a colored picture of Steve Canyon. I was hooked. If Terry belonged to my mother first, Steve Canyon was mine from the start. On the street, nobody else cared much about my obsession, so this became another part of my secret life."

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2019 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

That was fantastic reading, Howard. I appreciate your having posted it. It sounds like something I've read before.

"Steve Canyon was mine from the start. On the street, nobody else cared much about my obsession, so this became another part of my secret life."

That must have been Harlan Ellison's story, as well. On a considerably less-exalted level--not exalted at all, actually-- it was my experience, too, only it was in 1983. Steve Canyon was still running but none of the papers in my town carried it. I had to depend on family vacations during which I would scour those out-of-town newspapers for Steve Canyon and any other adventure strip I could find.

You expressed considerable surprise when Canyon was mentioned in this thread, and I'm happy to have unlocked that long-ago-forgotten room where that picaresque comic strip hero resided for so many years--so many decades.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2019 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Methinks kindred spirits all, you, Mr. H & Mr. Ellison. Those passages jumped out at me thanks to this thread. What a neat description of that first look. The Dragon Lady. Ha! Oh and New City. J. Mauceri mentioned he lived there at the present when we met in Brooklyn some years back. Just a short trek over the border from me in Jersey.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2020 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Pilfered from your melancholia thread...



...because this is precisely the kind of image that I associate with a title like "A Drinking Life."

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2020 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm quite proud of the Gleason thread, so it warms the cockles of my heart that at least one other person is reading it.

Papa Hemingway was no stranger to drink. I refer to the handy To Have and Have Another for a fascinating review of what Hemingway drank as well as what he didn't.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2020 - 11:57 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2020 - 4:41 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hemingway: What're you writing?

Gil: A novel.

Hemingway: 'Bout what?

Gil: It's about a man who works in a nostalgia shop.

Hemingway: What the hell is a nostalgia shop?

Gil: A place where they sell old things. Memorabilia. and... Does that sound terrible?

Hemingway: No subject is terrible if the story is true. If the prose is clean and honest, and it affirms courage and grace under pressure.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 2, 2020 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

AH!

 
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