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 Posted:   Sep 14, 2014 - 10:34 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Two different album covers same album on iTunes


https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/kerouacs-the-subterraneans/id589279080
Ideal record company but doesn't sound as good as mooching around.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/subterraneans-original-motion/id633797083
No suspect this one from jazz on film guys as says mooching around as record company.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2014 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

Nervous Angular Longhair

Thought this was going to be about cat breeds... frown

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2014 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)


https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/subterraneans-original-motion/id633797083
No suspect this one from jazz on film guys as says mooching around as record company.


Yes, Mooching Around I believe is the company that did the box set I have. Great top to bottom.

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2014 - 8:30 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Wouldn't certain parts of Jones' 'Pawnbroker' qualify?

Or is Waxman's 'Crime in the Streets' too direct?

I'm sure Sol Kaplan has something up his sleeve.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Bumping for "The Chapman Report."

 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 12:16 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ooh, I liked this thread! In fact, it inspired me to create the term "Nervous Angular Shorthair, which describes the jazzy underscore often heard in films and especially TV shows of the 1958-1963 period.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Ooh, I liked this thread! In fact, it inspired me to create the term "Nervous Angular Shorthair, which describes the jazzy underscore often heard in films and especially TV shows of the 1958-1963 period,

Well, that is precisely the time period I'm describing, but "longhair" in this sense refers to traditional descriptions of "out" classical music, hence its use here.

 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ooh, I liked this thread! In fact, it inspired me to create the term "Nervous Angular Shorthair, which describes the jazzy underscore often heard in films and especially TV shows of the 1958-1963 period,

Well, that is precisely the period I'm describing, but "longhair" in this sense refers to traditional descriptions of "out" classical music, hence its use here.


Completely understood. I would also add that the Nervous Angular Shorthair musically chronicles the hapless suburban shmendrik who makes his way through a Cold-War-at-its-height world, all to the magnificent strains of early Goldsmith and the like, only with jazz(y) underscore. Think the comedy episodes of The Twilight Zone and Eric Dolphy's Out to Lunch.

 
 Posted:   Feb 29, 2020 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Ooh, I liked this thread! In fact, it inspired me to create the term "Nervous Angular Shorthair, which describes the jazzy underscore often heard in films and especially TV shows of the 1958-1963 period.

You plagiarized that term, Phelps. It's actually a breed of cat. big grin

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2020 - 3:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ooh, I liked this thread! In fact, it inspired me to create the term "Nervous Angular Shorthair, which describes the jazzy underscore often heard in films and especially TV shows of the 1958-1963 period.

You plagiarized that term, Phelps. It's actually a breed of cat. big grin


A breed of cat, yes. The term "Shorthair Music" was also one of several late 1940s "terms that failed" for the then-new Bebop jazz.

Don't forget to tell me that Bebop is half the name of some sort of Japanese animated series.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2020 - 7:59 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Failed FSM member pick up line:

"Hey baby, wanna come back to my place? I'll put on some nervous angular longhair music."

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2020 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

An album by Teo Macero and Bob Prince called What's New might qualify. Also, William Russo's Russo in London. Russo arranged for Kenton and taught Barry, Karlin, and others. Alex North's North of Hollywood is incredibly moody in a sleazy jazz sort of way. I'm sure I'll think of others. Oh, very under the radar is an excellent lp composed by John Neel featuring Plas Johnson on tenor called Blue Martini.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Surprised that I have not mentioned Bob Graettinger's City of Glass.

Unfortunately, this video uses the reissue cover art and not the stunning original:

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The book West Coast Jazz by Ted Gioia devotes a chapter to City of Glass and Bob Graettinger. I never really embraced the album, or Stan Kenton's work, but its inclusion in that book makes it sound so interesting. I highly recommend West Coast Jazz.

https://www.amazon.com/West-Coast-Jazz-California-1945-1960/dp/0520217292

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   John Schuermann   (Member)

Denny Zeitlin's "Invasion of the Body Snatchers."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 9:34 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

The book West Coast Jazz by Ted Gioia devotes a chapter to City of Glass and Bob Graettinger. I never really embraced the album, or Stan Kenton's work, but its inclusion in that book makes it sound so interesting. I highly recommend West Coast Jazz.

https://www.amazon.com/West-Coast-Jazz-California-1945-1960/dp/0520217292


Stan Kenton was a as much of a brand as he was anything. I would argue that you need to assess his music based on the arranger. I have always liked, for the most part, the stuff by Graettinger, Johnny Richards, and Pete Rugolo. Bill Russo and Bill Holman, not so much.

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Stan Kenton was a as much of a brand as he was anything. I would argue that you need to assess his music based on the arranger. I have always liked, for the most part, the stuff by Graettinger, Johnny Richards, and Pete Rugolo. Bill Russo and Bill Holman, not so much.

It looks like I'll have to reassess my assessment of Stan Kenton.

Pete Rugolo I'm pretty sure I'll like. I've enthused over his arrangement of the Leave it to Beaver theme. Rugolo may also have been the composer of The Beav's all-instrumental record club collection ("Beaver Joins a Record Club") during that last, glorious season, when even Ward Cleaver was excited about the young new President...

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 12:21 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Stan Kenton was a as much of a brand as he was anything. I would argue that you need to assess his music based on the arranger. I have always liked, for the most part, the stuff by Graettinger, Johnny Richards, and Pete Rugolo. Bill Russo and Bill Holman, not so much.

It looks like I'll have to reassess my assessment of Stan Kenton.

Pete Rugolo I'm pretty sure I'll like. I've enthused over his arrangement of the Leave it to Beaver theme. Rugolo may also have been the composer of The Beav's all-instrumental record club collection ("Beaver Joins a Record Club") during that last, glorious season, when even Ward Cleaver was excited about the young new President...


That's the episode where he buys "You Drive Me Ape You Big Gorilla," correct? The Dickies would later write a song with this title!

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

That's the episode where he buys "You Drive Me Ape You Big Gorilla," correct?

It is! There's also a title called "My Wild Irish Geisha."

I wonder if any of the tracks from Rugolo's "Richard Diamond" soundtrack qualify as Nervous Angular Longhair music.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2020 - 12:29 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I wonder if any of the tracks from Rugolo's "Richard Diamond" soundtrack qualify as Nervous Angular Longhair music.

I think a few come close. There are definitely some on "Percussion at Work" and a few on "Out of Space," notably "Stereo Space Man" which was originally titled "For Hi-Fi Bugs."

As for Kenton, he is often better in theory than he is in practice, but I would recommend the aforementioned "City of Glass" by Bob Graettinger; and "Cuban Fire" and "West Side Story," both by Johnny Richards.

Pete Rugolo's Kenton work predates the LP era, although many of his arrangements were collected on LP.

 
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