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 Posted:   Jan 13, 2017 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

100th post twice in one day! Viva Papa!

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2017 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Ernest Hemingway has a cocktail recipe for days when you’ve had just enough of the world"


https://qz.com/889794/ernest-hemingway-has-a-cocktail-recipe-for-days-when-youve-had-just-enough-of-the-world/


"Death in the Gulfstream", a cocktail personally created by Hemingway. I, too must try this.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2017 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Luv it. Make mine a double.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2017 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

"Ernest Hemingway has a cocktail recipe for days when you’ve had just enough of the world"


https://qz.com/889794/ernest-hemingway-has-a-cocktail-recipe-for-days-when-youve-had-just-enough-of-the-world/


"Death in the Gulfstream", a cocktail personally created by Hemingway. I, too must try this.


I've had it; it is very good, but it needs to be made with Hendrick's Gin.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2017 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hendrick's Gin? Thanks. The Total Wine booze super store chain sells it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2017 - 3:02 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Luv it. Make mine a double.

I've been binge watching The Garden of Eden--as much as one can "binge watch" a film--and aside from the gorgeous 1920s costumes, set design, cinematography, and music, I find much to enjoy in the dialogue. It is Hemingwayesque without it being the often-leaden, forced attempt at being Hemingwayesque in terms of how it is expressed rather than the words themselves, if that makes sense.

"It's a strong wind today and we drink according to the wind."

Time to break out the wine and cheese, Howard! wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2017 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm going to attempt to like this F. Scott Fitzgerald documentary, Sincerely, F. Scott Fitzgerald. It has to be an improvement over the nauseating and inexplicably-accolade-riddled Winter Dreams, which consists mostly of now-ancient women who oohed and cooed over Fitzgerald because they were young schoolgirls at the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCfUsaX5F10

Wish us luck, Howard. wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2017 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Just watched the aforementioned documentary, and I highly recommend it to any Fitzgerald fan. Jay McInerney is the presenter of the thing.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 4, 2017 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Once again, thanks for the heads-up. Just clicked your link and fell in love with it already what with the slow section of you-know-what from our friend G. Gershwin. Will give it a full look in near future.

 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2017 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Once again, thanks for the heads-up. Just clicked your link and fell in love with it already what with the slow section of you-know-what from our friend G. Gershwin. Will give it a full look in near future.

The Beeb did a swell job with the cinematography and as you already noted, Gershwin's music. It's somewhat reassuring to know that New York City is still, pardon the use of this overused word, "iconic." Going from the views on display in the Scott doc, NYC has kept one of its many nicknames, "Gotham."

Oh, and this documentary is probably the only one I've seen in which photos of Scott's Hollywood screenwriting years are extensively chronicled--and they even show photos of him with a mustache!

 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2017 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Since this thread has taken a Fitzgeraldian turn, I thought some 1920s dames should be added for "flavor."

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2017 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Just rewatched Sincerely, F. Scott Fitzgerald and dashed off these jumbled impressions of what I saw. I'd better summon the ghost of Maxwell Perkins to whip this draft into shape:

Sincerely is a big improvement over the nauseating and inexplicably-accolade-riddled Winter Dreams, which consists mostly of now-ancient women from New York and Alabama who oohed and cooed over Fitzgerald because they were young schoolgirls at the the time. They also overstate their view of Zelda as being so ahead of her time, whereas those Southern Belles are most definitely not.

These rose-tinted reminiscences about Scott and Zelda are fine in small doses, but when they receive more screentime than the words from Fitzgerald’s work; it’s repetitive, dull, and ultimately frustrating that the filmmaker relied on those obviously still-lovestruck women.

The Beeb did a swell job with the cinematography and in its use of George Gershwin's music for this documentary. It's somewhat reassuring to know that New York City is still, pardon the use of this overused word, "iconic." Going from the views on display in the Scott's doc, NYC has kept one of its many nicknames, "Gotham."

This documentary is the only one I've seen in which photos of Scott's Hollywood screenwriting years are extensively chronicled--and they even show photos of him with a mustache.

Sincerely relies primarily on Scott’s written correspondence and quotes generously from the author’s books. It, does, however, continue the penchant documentaries have for romanticizing and glorifying Scott’s life and work. It’s as though Scott retrospectives must match the timbre of their subject’s work. Though to be fair, brief mention os made of Scott’s physical abuse of Sheila Graham. It’s difficult not to feel sympathetic towards Fitzgerald, as his letters are often witty, charming, and made of the same beautifully-crafted words as his novels.

Sincerely can convince the viewer that Scott the author and Scott the man aren’t much different from one another, and should anyone ever forget that, the film will pelt the viewer with yet another swelling excerpt from George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.

Ernest Hemingway, to whom Fitzgerald will forever be compared, rarely receives such kid glove treatment. Perhaps that’s due to Hemingway’s tough, prickly, and largely unsentimental style. Critics grudgingly accept Hemingway’s brilliance, but loathe his treatment of others, which I feel they allow to taint their view of his writing.

The second half of Sincerely, which chronicles Scott’s late-1930s Hollywood screenwriting career, is stronger than the first half. It’s fresher material than the oft-trodden 1920s Lost Generation period. Notable are Scott’s relationship with Sheila Graham, but best of all are the letters Scott wrote to his daughter, Scottie (who was a spitting image of Zelda), for whom the author attempted some long-distance parenting advice. These letters are more revealing when viewed as Fitzgerald trying to advise himself in the midst of his own well-documented alcoholism.

 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2017 - 12:18 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Ernest Hemingway has a cocktail recipe for days when you’ve had just enough of the world"

https://qz.com/889794/ernest-hemingway-has-a-cocktail-recipe-for-days-when-youve-had-just-enough-of-the-world/

"Death in the Gulfstream", a cocktail personally created by Hemingway. I, too must try this.


I've had it; it is very good, but it needs to be made with Hendrick's Gin.


Got the Hendrick's Gin today. Interesting-looking bottle. Will make the "Death in the Gulfstream" this weekend; I'll let you know how it goes.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2017 - 1:44 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Enjoyed the documentary. Beautifully underscored all right. Recognized a Herrmann cue towards the end. But music supervision accented the wistfulness of the material. Poor Scott looks like he was filled with pipe dreams. He had enough in him to get by with short stories and that was pretty much it. The booze was a mere symptom of an underlying conflict. Something 'spiritual' I suppose. Maybe all that business about allowing her to dominate his life while ruining his craft has merit.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2017 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Enjoyed the documentary. Beautifully underscored all right. Recognized a Herrmann cue towards the end. But music supervision accented the wistfulness of the material. Poor Scott looks like he was filled with pipe dreams. He had enough in him to get by with short stories and that was pretty much it. The booze was a mere symptom of an underlying conflict. Something 'spiritual' I suppose. Maybe all that business about allowing her to dominate his life while ruining his craft has merit.

Watched this three more times since my paunchy review, and while I learned mucho from the documentary's second half, which focused on "screenwriter Scott", I feel that the first half of "Sincerely" is entirely too "diaphanous" in its treatment of "prime 1920s Scott." I realize it's well-trodden territory, but with such a swell presentation and engaging presenter in McInerney, couldn't they have lingered a little longer in the Jazz Age?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2017 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Oh yes. How could they give such short shrift to the Paris years. Their impact on him was profound! And I like what you said about his letters. Self-awareness couched in narrative objectivity....the mark of no-way-out neuroses. A successful writer who failed. He was doomed to go early.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2017 - 8:22 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Today I received The Letters of Ernest Hemingway Vol. 1 1907-1922. Already have Vol 2, but still want to get Vol 3. I tend to wait for the prices to go down, whch is what I did. These volumes are worth it for the informative annotations alone!

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2017 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Ernest Hemingway has a cocktail recipe for days when you’ve had just enough of the world"


https://qz.com/889794/ernest-hemingway-has-a-cocktail-recipe-for-days-when-youve-had-just-enough-of-the-world/


"Death in the Gulfstream", a cocktail personally created by Hemingway. I, too must try this.


I've had it; it is very good, but it needs to be made with Hendrick's Gin.


mgh, I thank you for the Hendrick's recommendation. You are a gentleman among score-hoarding nerds.

From everything else I've read about the "Death in the Gulf Stream", it is supposed to be made with Holland Gin, but I'm sure if our "Papa" had imbibed this Gin most fine, he would smile approvingly, and pour us--and of course, himself--another.

Viva La Quince Brigada,

Phelps

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2017 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Enjoyed the documentary. Beautifully underscored all right. Recognized a Herrmann cue towards the end. But music supervision accented the wistfulness of the material. Poor Scott looks like he was filled with pipe dreams. He had enough in him to get by with short stories and that was pretty much it. The booze was a mere symptom of an underlying conflict. Something 'spiritual' I suppose. Maybe all that business about allowing her to dominate his life while ruining his craft has merit.

Hell, Jay McInerney was so impressive a presenter and convincing as a Johhny-Come-Lately Fitzgerald fan that I should probably thank him and buy a copy of Bright Lights, Big City (while remembering to forget the film adaptation of same).

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2017 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

"Ernest Hemingway has a cocktail recipe for days when you’ve had just enough of the world"


https://qz.com/889794/ernest-hemingway-has-a-cocktail-recipe-for-days-when-youve-had-just-enough-of-the-world/


"Death in the Gulfstream", a cocktail personally created by Hemingway. I, too must try this.


I've had it; it is very good, but it needs to be made with Hendrick's Gin.


mgh, I thank you for the Hendrick's recommendation. You are a gentleman among score-hoarding nerds.

From everything else I've read about the "Death in the Gulf Stream", it is supposed to be made with Holland Gin, but I'm sure if our "Papa" had imbibed this Gin most fine, he would smile approvingly, and pour us--and of course, himself--another.

Viva La Quince Brigada,

Phelps


Thank you, Jim. I recommended Hendrick's because it is hands down the best gin I have ever had. But, of course, it is all a matter of taste (so to speak).
To another gentleman,
L'chaim
Mike

 
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