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 Posted:   Feb 13, 2017 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Can't wait to shoot my 1963 retro-Esquire advert with me in Ivy League attire and horn-rimmed glasses surrounded by retrofied '60s chicks while giving Hendrick's my personal approval ("it's smooth and subdued...like every man should...Hendrick's")

 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2017 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hemingway's Bacon-Wrapped Trout with Corn Cakes:

https://paperandsalt.org/2012/06/18/ernest-hemingway-bacon-wrapped-trout-with-corn-cakes/

Franz Kafka's Potato Mushroom soup also looks good.

 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2017 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ah, it's just me here in this thread lately...Well Phelps, you may enjoy this article about Pauline Hemingway and her equally-doomed son, Gregory/Gloria:

http://allanellenberger.com/sins-of-the-mother-the-story-of-pauline-hemingway/

 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2017 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Ah, it's just me here in this thread lately...Well Phelps, you may enjoy this article about Pauline Hemingway and her equally-doomed son, Gregory/Gloria:

http://allanellenberger.com/sins-of-the-mother-the-story-of-pauline-hemingway/


I'm still with you, Jim; great article. Thanks.
Now where's the Hendricks.....

 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2017 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Where's the Hendrick's, you ask? Well, mostly it's gone. wink I bought the small apothecary bottle, not the New York Times printing room-sized oil drum Hendrick's.

Glad you liked the article. I was familiar with the whole Pauline-Gregory mess, but the location of her gravesite was new to me.

Reading about the "restored" edition of "A Moveable Feast" and the efforts Gregory's son made with the manuscripts to put Pauline in a better light would be interesting to read, but I don't want to buy the thing.

That's okay, though; I now have all three volumes of Ernest Hemingway's letters to keep me occupied. Wonderfully annotated.

 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2017 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Letters of Ernest Hemingway Vol. 1, 1907-1922



This volume features a foreword which includes a ton of detailed behind-the-scenes information on how the letters were accumulated from varied sources and the editorial choices made in what to omit and include as far as typos, grammatical errors, punctuation, etc. There is also a superb biographical introduction chronicling the goings ons in Hemingway's life during the period covered in this first volume.

As for the letters, even the teenaged Hemingway was a memorable correspondent. He is quite the cut up with an intelligent, often absurd sense of humor. Hemingway employs word play and satirizes many books, poems, movies, and songs of the time. He even writes warm, humorous letters to his later estranged elder sister Marcellne, which makes me wonder when their falling out occurred; perhaps when he became well known.

The difference in quality in just a few years (1913-16) shows how quickly Hemingway matured as a writer. It is a reflection of how children were expected to grow into adulthood almost overnight, and they usually did. By the end of this volume, Ernest Hemingway will have graduated high school, serve in World War I, get married, and move to Paris as a newspaper reporter. The next volume will chronicle his rise as one of the world's great writers.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2017 - 8:34 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I cannot accept that the writings lost by wife #1 went with the wind and won't turn up in a Parisian basement even if it's almost a hundred years later.

 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2017 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I cannot accept that the writings lost by wife #1 went with the wind and won't turn up in a Parisian basement even if it's almost a hundred years later.

I've always believed that those writings ended up in the Seine after the thief saw that there was no money in the suitcase.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2017 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Ouch. That is painfully plausible.

 
 Posted:   Feb 25, 2017 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


There's a letter Hemingway wrote to the son of an ill friend, and Hem is at his warmest, "your problem is my problem" best. Despite the fact that Hemingway himself was going through some severe health issues as well. I will post it as soon as I find it again--it's in the Selected Letters edited by Carlos Baker.

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Cuba's La Floridita turned 200 years old yesterday:

http://www.plenglish.com/index.php?o=rn&id=9774&SEO=hemingways-most-revered-havana-bar-turns-200

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

nada pues nada...wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


"Our nada who art in nada, nada be thy name thy kingdom nada thy will be nada in nada as it is in nada. Give us this nada our daily nada and nada us our nada as we nada our nadas and nada us not into nada but deliver us from nada; pues nada. Hail nothing full of nothing, nothing is with thee."

~A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Ah yes a little spritz of Hemingway to start an otherwise drab & droll Sun-day. FEEL THE ERN!

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

FEEL THE ERN!

You will! Every time you splash on Eau D'Ernest!

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 4:14 PM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

"Our nada who art in nada, nada be thy name thy kingdom nada thy will be nada in nada as it is in nada. Give us this nada our daily nada and nada us our nada as we nada our nadas and nada us not into nada but deliver us from nada; pues nada. Hail nothing full of nothing, nothing is with thee."

~A Clean, Well-Lighted Place


And a little later on:

"He disliked bars and bodegas. A clean well-lighted cafe was a very different thing. Now, without thinking further, he would go home to his room. He would lie in the bed and finally, with daylight, he would go to sleep. After all, he said to himself, it is probably only insomnia. Many must have it."

--A Clean Well-Lighted Place

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2017 - 8:28 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

You have both made my day. Merci.

 
 Posted:   Feb 28, 2017 - 7:38 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Have ordered a Hemingway documentary I have yet to see, Ernest Hemingway: Rivers to the Sea a 2005 entry from the long-running PBS American Masters series. I recall negative reviews from some fellow Hemingway pals o'mine upon this film's release, but I like to come to my own conclusions. wink This documentary includes interviews with lone-surviving Hemingway son, Patrick, so this should be worth it just for that.

http://www.popmatters.com/review/american-masters-ernest-hemingway/

Also have the Papa Hemingway in Cuba DVD on the way, a film I have watched and reviewed in this thread most Papa.

Howard L, should you ever find either volume of The Best of Bad Hemingway, I recommend giving those a read. However, I understand that most FSMers do not enjoy humor or laughter, so steer clear if you despise either of those. wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 28, 2017 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

An excellent 1983 interview with Martha Gellhorn. Her description of what she saw at Dachau is unsettling, to put it mildly. Like photographer Lee Miller--another female war correspondent--Gellhorn was forever scarred by her experiences in the Nazi death camps.



Ms. Gellhorn was quite a heavy smoker--yet still lived to the age of 89 (she committed suicide in 1998).

 
 Posted:   Feb 28, 2017 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

When Wolverine Met Hemingway: A History of Ernest Hemingway in Comics:

http://www.tcj.com/when-wolverine-met-hemingway-a-history-of-ernest-hemingway-in-comics-part-2/

 
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