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 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   Mark   (Member)

Well I for one will be listening to this piece and more from this composer. Many thanks for posting it.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

I've loved Honegger's symphonies for decades, especially #2 for strings (I love just about all big works for string orchestra). But I'm not familiar with his film music, and I don't know if today was the first time I've really listened to any of it. Now I really wanna see Mayerling.

Listen to this opening for a while and see if you get a Herrmann vibe - I certainly do (written in 1937, so like Bruce said, maybe Herrmann was influenced).

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 4:24 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Ding, ding, ding - we have a winner! Honegger has been a favorite of mine for decades. Ironically, the first Honegger piece I ever heard was Pastorale d'ete on Mr. Herrmann's The Impressionists LP. I fell head over heels in love with it and have never heard a bum piece of music from Honegger yet. There's a reasonably priced box set of the symphonies conducted by Serge Baudo - those are great performances for all five. His cello concerto is fantastic. Of all the film music CDs, and there are many, mostly on Marco Polo, the one with Mayerling is fantastic and so is the one with the complete Les Miserables score - which is utterly fantastic music. Also Crime and Punishment is amazing and very much ahead of its time, as you'll hear.

Here's Baudo doing Pastorale d'ete - I listen to this piece all the time. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBkagAu8N-g


And if you've never heard his most performed work, Pacific 231, seek it out. Wasn't this fun?

Happy to do more or encourage others to post their Name That Composer mystery tracks.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

I was sure it was a piece from this composer's opera...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 5:21 PM   
 By:   bagby   (Member)

Let us not forget too that a young struggling composer named Miklos Rozsa was dining with Honegger and lamenting about not having any work; that being a composer was a hard way to make a living. Honegger told him he should score films, because it paid well enough to stay alive.

And that happenstance dinner and discussion led to The Thief of Bagdad, Ben-Hur, Jungle Book, Double Indemnity, and all the rest.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 8:38 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Okay, here's another for your mental delectation. No cheating now smile That's the fun of this, at least I think that's the fun of this. This one might be a bit easier.

https://soundcloud.com/user-335279397/mystery-track-2

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   RcM   (Member)

Something about the melody makes me think this is by Nino Rota, but I'm not familiar with the work.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 10:20 PM   
 By:   Mark   (Member)



It reminds me of Nicola Piovani, but I am no expert on his work, so am unsure

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2019 - 10:44 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Not Rota or Piovani - but good guesses both. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 5:18 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

It doesn't sound like Rota to me, a little too much dissonance.

Soundhounding who it actually is....I'm full not surprised at all (nor was I surprised by the Honegger)

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 8:09 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

It certainly sounds italian Bruce.
Somebody trying to hint at Ennio/rota.
Is it piersanti?
Or one if the old hands like Savina ?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

It certainly sounds italian Bruce.
Somebody trying to hint at Ennio/rota.
Is it piersanti?
Or one if the old hands like Savina ?


Perhaps an older hand smile Italian would be on the right track. If you think along the Honegger lines in terms of the clews you'll figure it out.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   RcM   (Member)


Perhaps an older hand smile Italian would be on the right track. If you think along the Honegger lines in terms of the clews you'll figure it out.


Could it be something by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco? I haven't heard much beyond a couple of his guitar pieces.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 10:47 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

fascinating! Sounds like...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)


Perhaps an older hand smile Italian would be on the right track. If you think along the Honegger lines in terms of the clews you'll figure it out.


Could it be something by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco? I haven't heard much beyond a couple of his guitar pieces.


Ding ding ding! We have a winner. I love Castelnuovo-Tedesco and if folks don't know his work, seek it out. His violin concerto #2 is fantastic (recorded by RCA, played by Heifetz) as are these dances from Love's Labour's Lost, this one being the first of them. Also, his guitar concerto is great, as are most of the Shakespeare overtures. For those who don't know, he also wrote some pretty great film music scores, including And then There Were None, Return of the Vampire, The Brave Bulls, and many others.

I think it's fun to find these composers who straddled two musical worlds.

Someone else do one now, but I do have a few others ready to go.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 2:23 PM   
 By:   RcM   (Member)

OK - I'll try one...

https://soundcloud.com/user-598763651/mystery-clip-3

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

OK - I'll try one...

https://soundcloud.com/user-598763651/mystery-clip-3


What a GREAT and GRAND choice. I'll let others do the guessing, but this is a stunning piece of music by one of my all-time favorite composers smile When the guess is correct, I would like to know which performance this is.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Ding ding ding! We have a winner. I love Castelnuovo-Tedesco and if folks don't know his work, seek it out. His violin concerto #2 is fantastic (recorded by RCA, played by Heifetz) as are these dances from Love's Labour's Lost, this one being the first of them. Also, his guitar concerto is great, as are most of the Shakespeare overtures. For those who don't know, he also wrote some pretty great film music scores, including And then There Were None, Return of the Vampire, The Brave Bulls, and many others.

Any hope of Kritzerland releasing a Castelnuovo-Tedesco score (or even rarer concert work) some day, Bruce?

I agree about the consistent high quality of his music, and I was happy when he came up during my conversation with Leonard Slatkin, here:
http://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/824863-odyssey-interviews-leonard-slatkin

Incidentally, he wrote *two* guitar concerti...both excellently conducted by Slatkin on this album here:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=143103

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 7:47 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Not sure any elements exist on his stuff, but I do love his music.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2019 - 11:51 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

No cheating now smile

It does sound like Herrmann - and yet, it's not.

Sean, read the story that goes along with Lion Tamer - I posted it on Soundcloud.

Now, either others here don't like to have fun, are stumped but refuse to admit it, or are desperately trying to figure it out. Once revealed, I can make some reccomendations.



Yep my thoughts..Sounds Like Herrmann...

 
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