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Did They Mention the Music 2015
Posted By: Scott Bettencourt 4/6/2018 - 9:00 PM
When I began this series over a decade ago, it was intended to sum up the critical view of the film scores of the year just passed. However in the last few years, between the increased number of films whose reviews I search, the increased number of publications I read reviews in, and other time constraints, the "Did They Mention the Music?" section of my Friday columns has gone from looking at the scores of just-released films to scores of films released two years ago, which is why it's taken me so long to finish this particular column. (And I don't want to think about when Did They 2016 will be ready, much less 2017.) So just think of this column as a nostalgic look at the long-ago scores of 2015.


THE PRAISE:
 
AIR - Edo Van Breemen
 
"What it is, in other words, is science fiction in quotation marks. That makes for some unquestionable aesthetic pleasures -- namely, a swooping, whizzing synth score that builds to a Vangelis-esque end theme, and some handsome camerawork by Norm Li, cinematographer of the similarly retro-genre-fetishistic 'Beyond The Black Rainbow'. But it isn’t much of a reason to be. Cantamessa’s background is game design ('Manhunt,' 'Middle-Earth: Shadow Of Mordor'), and 'Air' is all environment and puzzles. However, unlike other recent movies that take their cues from game design -- namely Bong Joon-ho’s 'Snowpiercer' -- it doesn’t progress through its environment so much as circle it in repetitive tasks."
 
Ignatiy Vishnevetsky, The Onion AV Club
 
ALEX OF VENICE - David Wingo
 
"Apart from the strong performances -- that do keep the movie afloat despite from the narrative breaks in your emotional suspension of disbelief -- other cinematic elements help support the movie. The film is well shot with naturalistic lighting, and composer David Wingo’s wistful score is also quite excellent and effective. However, the melancholy, plaintive score arguably does too much of the emotional heavy-lifting and that’s because, again, these moments don’t always add up genuinely. 'Alex Of Venice”' isn't a strong sum of its good individual parts and many moments feel unearned. We believe and empathize with Mary Elizabeth Winstead when she’s upset often as she’s a good actress that can sell a scene, but we don’t always believe the situation or the sequence that got her from emotional point A to B. And this obviously hurts the movie and the viewer’s engagement in it, and that's not all."
 
Rodrigo Perez, The Playlist
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April 19
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David Fanshawe born (1942)
Dudley Moore born (1935)
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