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 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

Perhaps this is an old rumour, but I´m watching the astonishing LA CONFIDENTIAL right now, and IMBD reports, that Jerry Goldsmith replaced Elmer Bernstein. Is this true?

Thank you

Philipp

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

If it is, I've never heard of it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   Alexcremers   (Member)

But the film is astonishing, isn't it? Jerry Goldsmith's accompaniment is perfect.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yes.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 3:07 PM   
 By:   Southall   (Member)

It's not true. Bernstein was offered the film but turned it down (to do Hoodlum, a decision he may well have regretted!)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   Todesmelodie   (Member)

My understanding was that bernstein was approached to do "LA Confidential" but was already committed to "Hoodlum"

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I can't see conceive of this with Bernstein's music. Or what approach he may have taken. It certainly wouldn't have had the staccato edginess that Goldsmith contributed. Still, I imagine he's have come up with something interesting.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   Morlock1   (Member)

Sounds unlikely, given that Goldsmith scored Hanson's previous film.
Morlock- who thinks L.A. Confidential is one of Jerry's finer scores of the 90's.

 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:19 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

Bernstein would've been perfect composer casting for this one, more so than even Goldsmith, owing to his scoring activity in the REAL 1950s. That's precisely why he got latter-day jobs like Far From Heaven.

I'm not entirely sure about LA Confidential, even now. It's certainly a strong film, but I think it has slightly dubious racial attitudes. I dunno... there's something not quite right about it. However, Superman-Crowe in his stiff neck-brace at the finale is a moment of unintended hilarity/stupidity for which I'm grateful.

It's no Chinatown.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   Alexcremers   (Member)


It's no Chinatown.


That's right, son! It's better!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   Membership Expired   (Member)

But the film is astonishing, isn't it? Jerry Goldsmith's accompaniment is perfect.

Very few films are perfect.

L.A. Confidential just might be.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   Morlock1   (Member)

That's right, son! It's better!

I Agree. I like the film L.A. Confidential more than than Chinatown, and the score L.A. Confidential much more than Chinatown.
I don't think the earlier Goldsmith score is nearly as monumental as people seem to take for a given.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   zippy   (Member)

Yea! And you can get the score for five bucks!

Take that you Chinatown fans!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 4:57 PM   
 By:   Alexcremers   (Member)

And here's another thing: Mulholland Falls fans, buzz off!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 5:14 PM   
 By:   Morlock1   (Member)

And here's another thing: Mulholland Falls fans, buzz off!

I wasn't aware there were any.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Dan Hobgood   (Member)

Until recently, I had seen this movie only once--right after it got nominated for "Best Picture" in 1998. I always remembered being thrilled by it but had never had the urge to revisit it. A few weeks ago, though, I happened upon it on one of the premium channels to which I subscribe. Without much else to do at the time, I decided to relax and enjoy.

I was blown away. As much as I appreciated it before, I loved it even more this go-round. That was especially the case with respect to Jerry's score, which is utterly pitch-perfect in the movie. Edgy yet melodic; nostalgic yet contemporary; eerie yet romantic; scary yet, ultimately, triumphant.

While I wouldn't want to be without the scores Jerry wrote for movies that didn't deserve his talents, it's a shame some more sophisticated projects didn't come his way--as L.A. Confidential attests.

Dan

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 6:33 PM   
 By:   TenderLumpling   (Member)

Yea! And you can get the score for five bucks!

And that's just what it's worth!

smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 6:50 PM   
 By:   zippy   (Member)

Ouch! Now that's gonna be tender for awhile.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

I'm frankly surprised by some of the above assessments of CONFIDENTIAL vs. CHINATOWN, both film and score.

First, I quite agree about Bernstein's Fifties fitness for L.A.C. and a number of other movies he DID score. Too bad Bernstein AND Goldsmith didn't get more films of L.A.C.'s caliber to score in the latter decades of their respective careers.


CHINATOWN, of course, WAS a last-minute replacement score for Goldsmith, which makes its outstanding quality all the more remarkable. I've enjoyed listening to Goldsmith's L.A.C. score, but so far it's never haunted me the way his CHINATOWN music does, nor do I feel L.A.C. can work as pure music away from the film nearly as well as CHINATOWN has proved itself to do, especially last year in Disney Hall conducted by David Newman. You may prefer listening to L.A.C. for whatever reasons, but I strongly doubt that it should be considered a substantially better score than its predecessor.

As for the films, I'm REALLY dumbfounded at the stated preferences for L.A.C. over the Towne/Polanski masterpiece. I enjoyed the hell out of L.A.C. on the big screen, but I feel that it all fell apart in the home stretch with that unlikely happy Hollywood ending, so out of keeping with all that had gone before. Whereas, CHINATOWN on the big screen... well, as I said about the score, it haunts me still. (One reason being: it's a textbook example of the rare instance when the RIGHT ending was used against all odds and all big studio tendencies.)

IMHO, of course.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2006 - 7:14 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

As for the films, I'm REALLY dumbfounded at the stated preferences for L.A.C. over the Towne/Polanski masterpiece. I enjoyed the hell out of L.A.C. on the big screen, but I feel that it all fell apart in the home stretch with that unlikely happy Hollywood ending, so out of keeping with all that had gone before. Whereas, CHINATOWN on the big screen... well, as I said about the score, it haunts me still. (One reason being: it's a textbook example of the rare instance when the RIGHT ending was used against all odds and all big studio tendencies.)

You are, of course, right. CHINATOWN is a vastly better film. But LA CONFIDENTIAL remains refreshingly unsentimental for the most part, and is rare example of a contemporary film noir working well.

NP: THE KILLING FIELDS (Oldfield)

 
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