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 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Most, if not all of you, will be way ahead of me here, but this is my story.

After many years of watching TV on a second-hand, hanging-by-a-thread Sylvania set so old that it didn't have a plug in back for a DVD attachment, last November I finally upgraded, as I've long dreamt of doing, to a big juicy flat screen. And, as I always knew it would be, one of the distinct pleasures with my new set-up has been watching westerns on a big screen where they belong with all that Technicolor scenery and action.

So tonight I was flipping channels and landed on the Encore Western channel, catching the tail end of a 1951 Randolph Scott western with, to my pleasant surprise, a latter-day performance by Joan Leslie, one of my favorite Forties ingenues. I stuck around for the next feature, THE MAN FROM COLORADO, an unusual Forties oater starring Glenn Ford as a psycho-sadistic federal judge and William Holden as his buddy, the town Marshal. The ever reliable George Duning scored this one, in a familiar western sound of that period, but with some unusual echoing instrumental effects to suggest the Ford character's psychosis. I'd never seen the film before, though I'd long been aware of its existence.

I did not recognize the name of the movie immediately following, FACE OF A FUGITIVE with Fred MacMurray in the title role, but I thought I'd give it a try. This one, like the previous two, was a Columbia Pictures product, this time vintage 1959. It grabbed my attention from the very beginning, with the main title's unusual opening Coplandesque chords, evocative of the lonely prairie. I immediately hoped it wasn't a Columbia library score, for two reasons: I waned to know the name of this fine composer, and I wanted to hear throughout the film more of his classy music, rather modern, I thought, for a modestly-budgeted western from this period. Happily, it was indeed an original score, and happily it was credited to Jerrald Goldsmth.

The rest of the score lived up to the promise of its overture. One particularly striking and effective moment occurs in the climactic ghost town shoot-out, when MacMurray falls through a roof and lands on an old player piano, setting off a honky tonk piano roll which keeps slowing down and speeding back up again, an eerie distortion effect. I've resolved to keep a lookout from now on for more scores by this talented young composer. I'm very glad to bring him to your attention, and I hope we all will hear more of his music in the future.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 2:52 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Thanks for the heads-up, Preston! I caught that film too, and the composer certainly shows promise. It kind of seemed to veer away from the "clippity clop" standard Western movie sound. I thought I also detected a sort of nod towards the Bartok or Schoenberg (or even Berg) school of "modernity" (in inverted commas, but certainly modern for Hollywood). Wouldn't it be great if he got some high-profile work in maybe SF or psychological dramas or something? A kind of new twist on old ideas. I'm getting a little bit tired of the Max Steiner approach (although I hope he continues writing for many years to come - THE SEARCHERS is pretty good).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 3:03 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

..... I've resolved to keep a lookout from now on for more scores by this talented young composer. I'm very glad to bring him to your attention, and I hope we all will hear more of his music in the future.....


It's a nice and generous thought, Preston, but an unknown composer of a low-budget western of the fifties will probably never go anywhere. If he's writing westerns, he's probably of limited versatility, and there's so much competition and so many fall by the wayside. He'll likely be a meager success, if at all. Don't hold your breath.

What was his name again?....Gerald Klineschmidt?.....No, never heard of 'im......

smile

v

v

On second thought, perhaps he could give up music and become a dealer in collectible
bottle-caps. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 3:09 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Sadly, you're probably right manderley. He could well end up doing music for TV shows (that crazy sci-fi stuff for kids), or some goofy "spy" TV series. Oh well, he has to pay the bills I suppose.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Collectable bottle-caps --

"LOL Manderley," we used to call him...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 8:43 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

..... I've resolved to keep a lookout from now on for more scores by this talented young composer. I'm very glad to bring him to your attention, and I hope we all will hear more of his music in the future.....


It's a nice and generous thought, Preston, but an unknown composer of a low-budget western of the fifties will probably never go anywhere. If he's writing westerns, he's probably of limited versatility, and there's so much competition and so many fall by the wayside. He'll likely be a meager success, if at all. Don't hold your breath.

What was his name again?....Gerald Klineschmidt?.....No, never heard of 'im......

smile

v

v

On second thought, perhaps he could give up music and become a dealer in collectible
bottle-caps. smile


Indeed you're right Manderley. I recall this guy kicked around from flop western films like BLACK PATCH to flop western TV series like BLACK SADDLE.

All I remember is thinking if he changed his name it might help.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Y'know, if you'd actually like an album of this one you can make your voice heard here:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DFSRGVB

I voted for it! smile

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   johnbijl   (Member)

Pf.

Don't get your hopes up too high. I've heard that during the recording of his last score (again, a western!!!!), Bernard Herrmann barged in and telling this Goldschmuck to trash the score.

I wasn't there, but a guy I know, knows a guy.. you know how it goes.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Y'know, if you'd actually like an album of this one you can make your voice heard here:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DFSRGVB

I voted for it!

Yavar


Thank you, Yavar.

But, one question: Who reads this thing? What's it all about?

Frankly, when I found that I could vote for only one title, (as opposed to, say, ranking them in order of preference), I voted for "THRILLER!"

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 12:04 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I voted for BLACK PATCH because THRILLER is rumored not to be around without any real verification. It would be a bummer spending a lot of money re-recording something and then have the original come out and kill sales.

BLACK PATCH and FACE OF A FUGITIVE we are much more confident are actually gone and there would be a real improvement from those early recordings and no competition.

Now if it is confirmed THRILLER is gone I would change my vote.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Until Goldsmith's THRILLER Scores are released on CD, definitely pick up the THRILLER COMPLETE SERIES DVD BOX SET which features all of Jerry Goldsmith's and Morton Steven's episode scores on Isolated Tracks. Really awesome stuff!


http://www.amazon.com/Thriller-Complete-Series-Boris-Karloff/dp/B003NOGNQU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406232741&sr=8-1&keywords=Thriller+Boris+Karloff


Well this is how they advertise it:

Isolated music and effects tracks for select episodes from composers Jerry Goldsmith and Morton Stevens.


But I'm sure they are all of the Goldsmith scores and most of the Stevens. The effects are minimal and the music sounds awesome! 14 DVD's for $40.00 is a No brainer and a must have!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 2:07 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

As a matter of fact, I must have it, because I distinctly remember buying it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Well, Tadlow orchestrator Leigh Philips is one of the people looking at it:

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=102785&forumID=1&archive=0&pageID=2&r=783#bottom

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Thanks.

I hope this is like DANCING WITH THE STARS, where I can vote more than once...? If so, I'll gladly go back and vote for BLACK PATCH/FACE OF A FUGITIVE.

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I think it's one vote per computer for both surveys...

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 9:49 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Too bad. (For the record, on the phone you can vote multiple times for DANCING/STARS. Computers, maybe not, I don't know).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Goldsmith's BLACK PATCH Love Theme is so good. His music was always so full of passion and dimension.

A TADLOW BLACK PATCH / FACE OF A FUGITIVE would be so awesome!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jo4jD5xF3YA

 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2014 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Indeed, zooba -- and thanks again for extracting that Youtube suite for us. I'd seen the film before and liked the music but it wasn't until I heard your suite that I realized just how much I wanted it to be released!

Yavar

 
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