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 Posted:   Sep 7, 2020 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

I've been watching two American made programs recently: THE BOYS and TED LASSO. The Boys has an English character (played by a Kiwi who sounds Australian) and Ted Lasso, which is set in England. In both programs they write English people as saying American words we don't use or getting our slang wrong.

In The Boys, the English guy has a scream at someone and then says: "I'm sorry I lost my bottle at you". This isn't how you use the term. The term should have been "I lost my rag". Losing your bottle means you lose confidence or your nerve or act cowardly if you "bottled it".

Multiple times in Ted Lasso - which is about an American football coach who goes to manage an English Premier League soccer team - they have Americanisms where we never use them. We don't say "tie" we say "draw" in regards to sports results, that keeps cropping up. It's odd, as half the humour is pointing out what English and American people say differently then they get that wrong. And there were a few other things which now escape me.

Have any of you noticed other such verbal blunders in programs or films? Incorrect use of slang and such?

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 5:02 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I've been watching two American made programs recently:

Surely you mean programmes.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

I've seen many US shows with Americans playing Irish characters. They all sound like Ian Paisley and that's just the women. That really gets my goat.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

In the UK sitcom "As Time Goes By", an "American" film producer character says "I'll sort it." If he were American, he would say "I'll handle it" or "I'll take care of it", but never, ever "sort it."

In the same show, another "American" film producer says "Sorry?" when he doesn't understand something another character says. If he were American, the film guy would say "Excuse me?" or "What was that?" and possibly "Say again?", but not "Sorry."

With accents, there are Brit actors using "American" accents that "originate" from a "Kentucky, New York" neverland coupled with a nasal twang that simply doesn't exist anywhere in our godforsaken country.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Well, the spoken Norwegian in THE THING was of course famously not Norwegian at all, but some on-the-spot made up nonsense language, which approximated some German, Danish, Dutch... Could be taken for Norwegian for anyone who doesn't actually know Norwegian. :-D I think it's rather funny, as it assures that NO ONE -- not even real Norwegians -- understand what the pilot is saying, though the "translation" (and what is in the script) was something like: "Get the hell away from that thing. That's not a dog, it's some sort of thing! It's imitating a dog, it isn't real! Get away, you idiots!"

And the "German" in DIE HARD was also partly nonsense German. The words were mostly German alright, but the way they were put together just made no sense. Hans Gruber at one time says "Schieß dem Fenster", which isn't anything any actual German speaking person would say, as it makes no sense. (I guess he should have said "schieß' auf das Fenster" or "zerschieß das Fenster", either would work. :-) )


On the other hand, both the French and German in TWILIGHT ZONE - THE MOVIE (in the "Time Out" segment) was really well done.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

My ex is Vietnamese and he gets a kick out of all of the movies that purport to having someone speaking in Vietnamese when in fact, is just plain rubbish.(Yes, I know, that is typically a Brit slang word for crap but I like using it. lol)

The biggest offender of all time that he has ever heard is the John Wayne Vietnam War movie "The Green Berets". Any time that George Takei's "South Vietnamese character says something that's not English, ie Vietnamese, he would laugh his ass off, saying, "He's not saying ANYTHING!"

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jane Asher in the British sitcom The Old Guys says "sweater" instead of "jumper" and "fire" instead of "sack."

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

xebec, have you abandoned your own thread?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 8:39 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Totally forgot i'd started it. Stupid memory.

Gah, Jeh zapped me for a spelling mistake. Bah.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 4:29 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Well, the spoken Norwegian in THE THING was of course famously not Norwegian at all, but some on-the-spot made up nonsense language, which approximated some German, Danish, Dutch... Could be taken for Norwegian for anyone who doesn't actually know Norwegian. :-D I think it's rather funny, as it assures that NO ONE -- not even real Norwegians -- understand what the pilot is saying, though the "translation" (and what is in the script) was something like: "Get the hell away from that thing. That's not a dog, it's some sort of thing! It's imitating a dog, it isn't real! Get away, you idiots!"

And the "German" in DIE HARD was also partly nonsense German. The words were mostly German alright, but the way they were put together just made no sense. Hans Gruber at one time says "Schieß dem Fenster", which isn't anything any actual German speaking person would say, as it makes no sense. (I guess he should have said "schieß' auf das Fenster" or "zerschieß das Fenster", either would work. :-) )


On the other hand, both the French and German in TWILIGHT ZONE - THE MOVIE (in the "Time Out" segment) was really well done.


Well, I'll be darned. There's more obfuscation in The Thing than I'd given consideration. Well, whatever Hans said, he puts in a Shakespeare, then, with considerable eye rolling due to his colleague in crime not quite getting it in pseudo-German, says in mock exasperation, "shoot the glass." Considering what you say, it is inevitable the exceptional thief mouths it in the language of international recognition.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 2:41 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)



Well, I'll be darned. There's more obfuscation in The Thing than I'd given consideration. Well, whatever Hans said, he puts in a Shakespeare, then, with considerable eye rolling due to his colleague in crime not quite getting it in pseudo-German, says in mock exasperation, "shoot the glass." Considering what you say, it is inevitable the exceptional thief mouths it in the language of international recognition.



LOL... it now makes perfect sense that Karl just stares at Hans with a "WTF are you saying?!" look when Hans says "schieß dem Fenster" and Hans has to repeat it in English.... which is really funny, that the two German terrorists don't understand each other unless they converse in English.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 3:01 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

It didn't really need vocalising in English because if the bad guys started shooting at the glass partitions everywhere, it would be obvious as to why they were doing so. The funny thing is it's all down to cinematic transactional formality. If it isn't explained to the audience it might equate to a partial dramatical vacuum, so it gets popped in one way or the other. We see McClane hopping around barefoot in the park and we already know the guy is going to be coming through. Also, I suppose it might have been done just so we could get a dose of Rickman's gruff accent (RIP) to fill that outright necessary space.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

NCIS s.15 ep.21: One Step Forward

Character Clayton Reeves, an MI:6 officer "on loan", says foreclose when any Brit would say repossess ...

... and whilst we are used to English dialogue in US programmes/films not being quite right ...

the actor concerned, Duane Henry, was born only a few miles from where I'm sitting! He should know better!!! smile

Foreclose is used in English but normally only when professionals are involved, not for everyday language used by the general public.
Mitch

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

British TV icon Penelope Keith was squawking about the Americanization of English in an article some years ago.

I will admit that I prefer my Brits to speak like Brits.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 8:31 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

British TV icon Penelope Keith was squawking about the Americanization of English in an article some years ago.

I will admit that I prefer my Brits to speak like Brits.


Squawking ? in, presumably, a written article ... when the defintion is to shout, scream, or cry in a loud, unpleasant way

Perhaps this is something you shouldn't have said/written?

And to suggest that of one of our finest TV actresses ... Dame ... I'd say you'd be for the chop the moment you set foot on our shores.

Apart from which, I don't think she's considered an icon these days ... smile
Mitch

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Rattled your cage, did I?

Good. big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

DeNiro mispronounced Hereford in Ronin and not being corrected by Sean Bean's SAS character. HEARford? Really, Robert? And then his career suffered ever after till The Irishman (probably).

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

In the otherwise charming-to-me Magic in the Moonlight, characters annoyingly refer to blood pudding as if it were something to eat on its own, like dessert pudding, rather than as a side to a fry up. Englishman Colin Firth went along with this as if it were completely normal.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 11:25 AM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

In the otherwise charming-to-me Magic in the Moonlight, characters annoyingly refer to blood pudding as if it were something to eat on its own, like dessert pudding, rather than as a side to a fry up. Englishman Colin Firth went along with this as if it were completely normal.

Actually around our way oop North you do have it boiled on its own with just a bit of hot mustard. It's still good. I've had it a few times like that. Happens at the local beer festival. Though mostly it's fried hockey pucks with breakfast.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'll have to try it that way, what with my being a mustard obsessive.

Would that manner of eating the stuff extend to Brit poshos with large estates in the South of France? Eileen Atkins and Colin Firth whipping up their own blood pudding?

 
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