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 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

CACCIATORI DI NAVI (Ship Hunters)
Only One Survived
Spectacular Morricone #8

This series is inspired by a controversy thread where someone posited the idea that besides THE MISSION and some Sergio Leone westerns Ennio Morricone hasn't written anything great. Rather than making my usual comment that most of Morricone's great scores are from Italy and trying to get Americans to listen to them is like getting them to see movies with subtitles, I decided to take another tact. Since I am at an age where I will only be able to make my case a finite number of times I decided to turn this into a series presenting each great score one at a time, sort of like recordman.

Nothing inspires Morricone more than nature, natural landscapes and man vs. nature stories. You can even see that in his most well known films THE MISSION and the Sergio Leone westerns. Folco Quilici is an Italian director who spent his life making documentaries, semi-documentaries and fictional films about the sea. This is one of his most ambitious ones about 4 friends (Perry King, Fabio Testi, Michael Beck, Paolo Bonacelli ) who embark from New York on a sea adventure and get one in spades. Basically two themes dominate the score and there is a lot of underwater music so much of it is muted. But this cross between a Thor Heyerdahl doc and survival tale yields enough inspiration to remain memorable. And the main theme is unlike any Ennio ever did before or since. This was also during his pan-flute phase. Here, CASUALTIES OF WAR and THE MISSION were all fine uses of that instrument played this time by "Il Trenino Dell Ande"



Morricone worked on one other film with Quilici, OCEANO another score that stays with you, but much more lowkey.


#1 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74811&forumID=1&archive=0
#2 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74838&forumID=1&archive=0
#3 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74871&forumID=1&archive=0
#4 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74899&forumID=1&archive=0
#5 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74951&forumID=1&archive=0
#6 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=74968&forumID=1&archive=0
#7 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=75041&forumID=1&archive=0
#8 http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=75065&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   Michael_McMahan   (Member)

I love this score. Although the main theme is repeated a lot, I never grow tired of that melody! Great use of pan pipes.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 6:24 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Never heard of this movie or score. Interesting theme that I like. Nice to learn something new each day. Thanks Henry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 8:34 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Never heard of this movie or score. Interesting theme that I like. Nice to learn something new each day. Thanks Henry.

Thanks Joan! You are always there for support and for love of Elmer.
I really regret we didn't connect at Radio City.

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 9:21 PM   
 By:   plindboe   (Member)

This is in my top10 of all-time favourite themes. I also love the organ versions of the theme, which I find very powerful.

It must be said though that the album is a bit lacking in variety. He seems to change the orchestration of some cues, but they're otherwise constructed exactly the same way. Still, with that theme and the different orchestrations, I find the album highly enjoyable.

Peter smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 5, 2011 - 9:26 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

Thanks for the post. I didn't know about that one.

Cheers!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 12:19 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

This is one EM score which has, to date, eluded me frown

Tr. 4 Hunters on the Forecastle does re-appear on the score to Il Barone but ... according to www.chimai.com the track is sourced from his non-film work collection of the early 1970's (Sound Dimensions).

I shall keep a look out (smile) for this score!

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 8:45 AM   
 By:   Zambra Alex   (Member)

Thanks for your post Morricone.
This score is simply the best of his pan flute period.
Never saw the movie, yet this CD is played very often in our home.
Alex.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 11:22 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Not really feeling this one it has a certain 80s vibe about it that does nothing for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Which reminds me. Since I have 400 scores to pick from I usually just come from the gut and what I like. And what I like is pretty much what surprises me, not what he has already done. So are there those who have a special preference in a kind of score yet have never heard Morricone in that style? I can't think of anything he hasn't tackled, even though he prefers the offbeat. Let me know.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Great theme, but I am curious; so far you've only discussed his scores to European movies right? My suggestion is for your next installment to pick a score he did for an American movie as there are plenty of great choices and this might prove easier to identify with for the Americans wink

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

I think Henry is going increasingly for very unknown Morricone scores (with an exception here or there). SHIP HUNTERS is even unknown to myself, I never heard of it before. So I think he would not even want to pick a score from a movie that other Americans would easily know.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 3:21 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Well seeing as how his picks are a reply to Morricone just being known for "The Mission" and the Leone spaghetti westerns, I see no harm in doing an American entry as well. It's supposed to be the diversity of Morricone's scoring that should be on display here.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 4:04 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Well seeing as how his picks are a reply to Morricone just being known for "The Mission" and the Leone spaghetti westerns, I see no harm in doing an American entry as well. It's supposed to be the diversity of Morricone's scoring that should be on display here.

Very true. But the problem I am addressing is that even though Morricone has written some superb scores for American films, he has written more for films outside America. AND his worst American scores are more well known than some masterpieces he has done elsewhere. The result is there are some who hate him based on his American work because they think that is all there is to him.
I've also used as an example, if you randomly take 3/4 of John William's scores and pretend they don't exist would he be the same composer to the world? Some say it depends on what quarter you choose. I say no, the totality of William's work is what makes him what he is. Since 1970 I've had the burdon of arguing Morricone's place in film music with an arm and two legs missing. I'm hoping this series may help. It's all in the music and not the familiarity. Although to be honest things likeTHE MERCENARY, LA CALIFFA and INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN are pretty well known to Morricone fans. If anyone still thinks he isn't all that great after this, fine. But if even one of these pieces reveal something you never heard regarding Morricone and you find merit in it, then there has got to be a natural curiosity that will kick in and you will feel compelled to explore more of him. That is if you are anything like me.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 5:39 PM   
 By:   plindboe   (Member)

Not really feeling this one it has a certain 80s vibe about it that does nothing for me.

I died a little inside reading that comment. wink Must admit I don't detect an 80s vibe at all. Only vibe I pick up is of sheer awesomeness.

Peter smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   plindboe   (Member)

Which reminds me. Since I have 400 scores to pick from I usually just come from the gut and what I like. And what I like is pretty much what surprises me, not what he has already done. So are there those who have a special preference in a kind of score yet have never heard Morricone in that style? I can't think of anything he hasn't tackled, even though he prefers the offbeat. Let me know.

If you're looking for suggestions I think "I promessi sposi" deserves alot of attention, being one of his very best, but also one of his most obscure scores. I posted some clips on another forum and people went nuts.

"Nostromo" is also one of his best, and in my opinion kicks "The mission"s butt.

"Sepolta viva" is more baroque in sound and you haven't posted a score in that style yet.

"Cosi' come sei" is another great one.

And "I guardiani del cielo" which has his desert score sound.

For an obscure american score you can mention "Butterfly" which has got to be the most sensual sounding music ever.

I could list 100 more, but I think it's the sane thing to stop right here.

Peter smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   JSDouglas   (Member)

This is a favorite of mine. I've never seen the film but the soundtrack mysteriously appeared in a CD shop I used to frequent (now closed). Morricone has always required of his listeners that they be open to almost anything and when I'm in the mood I will take a leap of faith and purchase a title I am otherwise totally unfamiliar with. I liked the title SHIP HUNTERS and thought it might be some kind of adventure music - well I was totally amazed by the music I heard. It was both unexpected and highly enjoyable to my ears - despite the repetition of themes and arrangements.

I also love the section using pipe organ - and the one where the pan pipes take up the rhythm - and the plucked strings - and...well...I love it all!

I may never get to see the movie that uses this inspired music but I will always be glad I had the impulse to take a chance on this CD.

Morricone, you are doing just fine - keep these appreciation threads coming.

John

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

This is a favorite of mine. I've never seen the film but the soundtrack mysteriously appeared in a CD shop I used to frequent (now closed). Morricone has always required of his listeners that they be open to almost anything and when I'm in the mood I will take a leap of faith and purchase a title I am otherwise totally unfamiliar with. I liked the title SHIP HUNTERS and thought it might be some kind of adventure music - well I was totally amazed by the music I heard. It was both unexpected and highly enjoyable to my ears - despite the repetition of themes and arrangements.

I also love the section using pipe organ - and the one where the pan pipes take up the rhythm - and the plucked strings - and...well...I love it all!

I may never get to see the movie that uses this inspired music but I will always be glad I had the impulse to take a chance on this CD.

Morricone, you are doing just fine - keep these appreciation threads coming.

John


Thanks JS, it's good that there is some response to these more obscure pieces. Get's more people to at least sample it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 6, 2011 - 10:18 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)


A rich thread. It will be a long while before the subject is exhausted.

Thanks Morricone.

We should all strive to do some similar works.

In fact, I will get to it right away.

Cheers!

 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2011 - 8:16 AM   
 By:   AlexCope   (Member)

I'd been wanting to hear this ever since Southall praised the main theme at the old Moviewave site years ago. It is indeed a great piece. I love the slow but steady upward climb of the theme. The way Morricone works, he's able to give his music space to breathe, and I think that's a strong reason a lot of it works so well away from the films.

 
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