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 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I've read

GWTW by Gavin Lambert
FUTURE NOIR (making of BLADE RUNNER)
some book about the making of SUPERMAN by a guy who was an actor in the Smallville scenes
Bob Balaban's diary about making CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

Are there any other "making of..." books about movies that you can recommend?


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:02 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

My favourite ones are the old paperback sized ones from my younger days.
The Jaws Log, the excellent Making of The Empire Strikes Back (I wonder would Lucas allow something like that book to be published in this day and age), the Balaban CE3K one you mention.
Although the newer, bigger coffee table style books look the part, I never found any as engaging as the aforementioned ones.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I vaguely remember a Making Of Superman The Movie paperback (with really thin pages) that was a very good expose of the whole Salkinds/Spengler mess that was going on while Donner was trying to complete the film(s).

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)



I just read Making Tootsie from 1983 by journalist Susan Dworkin. It was a fascinating look at the details of filmmaking and story construction, an insider's look into how Sydney Pollack worked and how Dustin Hoffman worked at the time. It's a quick read at 100 pages and well worth the time. I've always loved the movie, but now knowing how much thought was put into every detail enhances the movie even more. The trials they went through to get Hoffman's make-up just right are interesting, as are things Pollack was concerned about, like ensuring that Hoffman's character (the male part) wouldn't be perceived as a chauvinist and/or a jerk to the Teri Garr character. Check it out.

http://www.amazon.com/Making-Tootsie-Dustin-Hoffman-Pollack/dp/0937858196/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279649423&sr=8-2-catcorr

(I'm amazed that the book isn't cheaper; I've had my copy for years and just got around to reading it)


Also a big fan of Stephen Rebello's Alfred Hitchcock and The Making of Psycho. I know just about everything there is to know about Psycho, but this book actually uncovered a few things I didn't know.



http://www.amazon.com/Alfred-Hitchcock-Making-Stephen-Rebello/dp/0714530034/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1279649547&sr=1-1


Janet Leigh's book on the subject is great, too.



http://www.amazon.com/Psycho-Behind-Scenes-Classic-Thriller/dp/051770112X/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1279649477&sr=1-4

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

I don't know if this is true or if I'm making it up, but I think I've got one about the making of EXORCIST 2: THE HERETIC. If I'm wrong, there should be a book about the making of Boorman's troubled, misunderstood masterpiece.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

I loved Future Noir.

My first two "making of" books, purchased when I was something like 12, lo these many decades ago, were Making of Star Trek http://amzn.to/9Edo0C and The Trouble with Tribbles http://amzn.to/aAPvn9. Both are terrific and I actually reread them a couple years back.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

I second Kev McGann's mention of The Jaws Log.

And I don't know if it's also the same one he was thinking of or not, but Once Upon A Galaxy: A Journal of The Making of the Empire Strikes Back, by Alan Arnold, is excellent. Probably out-of-print, but worth tracking down.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

I loved Future Noir.

My first two "making of" books, purchased when I was something like 12, lo these many decades ago, were Making of Star Trek http://amzn.to/9Edo0C and The Trouble with Tribbles http://amzn.to/aAPvn9. Both are terrific and I actually reread them a couple years back.


Oh wait. You asked about movies. D'oh!

I've never read but almost purchased many times over the years the making of 2001 http://amzn.to/aroJFH.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

I loved Future Noir.

My first two "making of" books, purchased when I was something like 12, lo these many decades ago, were Making of Star Trek http://amzn.to/9Edo0C and The Trouble with Tribbles http://amzn.to/aAPvn9. Both are terrific and I actually reread them a couple years back.


Oh wait. You asked about movies. D'oh!

I've never read but almost purchased many times over the years the making of 2001 http://amzn.to/aroJFH.


There were also a couple of Trek movie :"making of books. One for ST:TMP ttp://amzn.to/dBVBCt, one for Wrath of Khan http://amzn.to/90iY5q and one for Shatner's Folly, er, I mean Star Trek V http://amzn.to/cejreQ.

And Walter Koenig did his own making of ST:TMP http://amzn.to/dab101.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

You might enjoy Making of Singin in the Rain http://amzn.to/boC2ZZ and the Citizen Kane Book, in which Pauline Kael tried to take all credit away from Welles http://amzn.to/dbUC6L.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Sorry to keep bombarding you with stuff, but my shelves are full of this kind of thing.

For instance, Roger Moore's diary about Live and Let Die http://amzn.to/bHPRoA.

Okay, I'll stop now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:51 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

By: GoldsmithFan (Member)
"And I don't know if it's also the same one he was thinking of or not, but Once Upon A Galaxy: A Journal of The Making of the Empire Strikes Back, by Alan Arnold, is excellent. Probably out-of-print, but worth tracking down."
------------------------------------------------
Yeah, that was the title. It goes into detail about the breakdown between Lucas and Kirschner, wherein Kirschner ended up ignoring most of Lucas' commands/instructions and stuck to his own perceived plan. The name Charles Lippincott is in my mind, did he provide all the stills for the book or something?

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:57 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

By: GoldsmithFan (Member)
"And I don't know if it's also the same one he was thinking of or not, but Once Upon A Galaxy: A Journal of The Making of the Empire Strikes Back, by Alan Arnold, is excellent. Probably out-of-print, but worth tracking down."
------------------------------------------------
Yeah, that was the title. It goes into detail about the breakdown between Lucas and Kirschner, wherein Kirschner ended up ignoring most of Lucas' commands/instructions and stuck to his own perceived plan. The name Charles Lippincott is in my mind, did he provide all the stills for the book or something?


Once Upon A Galaxy http://amzn.to/dqlTWP

I'll go find my copy and check for Lippincott...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Yeah, that was the title. It goes into detail about the breakdown between Lucas and Kirschner, wherein Kirschner ended up ignoring most of Lucas' commands/instructions and stuck to his own perceived plan. The name Charles Lippincott is in my mind, did he provide all the stills for the book or something?

I looked through my copy real quick. There are two sections of behind-the-scenes photos and they're all credited to different people, but I didn't see Lippincott's name on any of them.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Yeah, that was the title. It goes into detail about the breakdown between Lucas and Kirschner, wherein Kirschner ended up ignoring most of Lucas' commands/instructions and stuck to his own perceived plan. The name Charles Lippincott is in my mind, did he provide all the stills for the book or something?

I looked through my copy real quick. There are two sections of behind-the-scenes photos and they're all credited to different people, but I didn't see Lippincott's name on any of them.


Ditto...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:01 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Hmmmmm. I wonder what I'm thinking about then?

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I loved Future Noir.

My first two "making of" books, purchased when I was something like 12, lo these many decades ago, were Making of Star Trek http://amzn.to/9Edo0C and The Trouble with Tribbles http://amzn.to/aAPvn9. Both are terrific and I actually reread them a couple years back.


Oh wait. You asked about movies. D'oh!

I've never read but almost purchased many times over the years the making of 2001 http://amzn.to/aroJFH.


I just remembered that I have read this one. It is GREAT, and I'm sorry I don't still have my copy. You should get it, TNG.

If you like these sorts of books (and it sounds like you do) it really is an absorbing read.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I read a lot of these 'making of' movie books when I was younger. One of the most informative and fascinating, from a filmmaker's perspective, was John Boorman's book about the making of "The Emerald Forest":

"Money Into Light: A Diary"
By John Boorman
http://www.amazon.com/Money-into-Light-John-Boorman/dp/0571137725

I enjoyed this one, which had a real fly-on-the-wall feel:

"The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark"
by Derek Taylor
http://www.amazon.com/Making-Raiders-Lost-Ark/dp/0345297253

Here's that book Kev mentioned about Superman, which was more gossipy:

"The Making of Superman The Movie"
by David Mark Petrou
http://www.amazon.com/Making-Superman-Movie-Michael-Petrou/dp/0446825654

This one was very candid and gave me a better appreciation of the movie, which I did not like so much, but it's based on the correspondence between Peter Hyams and Arthur C. Clarke which was quite novel for its day as email:

"The Odyssey File: The Making of 2010"
by Arthur C. Clarke and Peter Hyams
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/c/arthur-c-clarke/odyssey-file.htm

Clarke also published a truly fascinating account of his experience with Stanley Kubrick, which is crammed full of unused concepts and extracts from abandoned screenplay scenarios:

"The Lost Worlds of 2001"
by Arthur C. Clarke
http://www.amazon.com/Lost-Worlds-2001-Arthur-Clarke/dp/0451125363

And another book I treasure on that topic is this little paperback, which is more like a scrapbook of the film, from soup to nuts, including some fascinating letters to the director from early fans:

"The Making of Kubrick's 2001"
by Jerome Agel
http://www.amazon.com/Making-Kubricks-2001-Jerome-Agel/dp/0451071395

I do agree with the folks above that Carl Gottleib's "The JAWS Log" is one of the best, and I know he has updated it recently; but I also read another book published at the same time by a local Martha's Vineyard resident:

"The Making of the Movie JAWS"
by Edith Blake
http://www.amazon.com/Making-Movie-Jaws-Edith-Blake/dp/0345248821

Lots to chew on there!

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   Ebab   (Member)

“Future Noir” is one of my favorites as well.

I also recommend J. W. Rinzler, “The Making of Star Wars” (2007).

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345494768

First it’s a lavish coffee-table book, but also filled elaborately with the description of the creative process, and makes a very solid impression in every regard. The origin as a “LucasBook” may make you suspicious but, being mainly based on previously unused interviews made at the time, it seems largely free of revisionism (“there was always a trilogy planned …”). There is a sequel covering “Empire”, scheduled for fall, that I’ve pre-ordered blindly already.

Not strictly a “Making of”, but indispensable: Truffaut’s interview book with Hitchcock.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2010 - 12:56 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Ebab, Rinzler's Indy Jones book is also quite handsome and a good read:

"The Complete Making of Indiana Jones"
by J.W. Rinzler
http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Making-Indiana-Jones-Definitive/dp/0345501292

And I must add another more recent one, which I loved so much that I publicly endorsed on Amazon, which I rarely do!

"A.I. Artificial Intelligence: From Stanley Kubrick to Steven Spielberg"
by Jane M. Struthers, Chris Baker, Jan Harlan
http://www.amazon.com/I-Artificial-Intelligence-Stanley-Spielberg/dp/0500514895

 
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