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 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

This may be a "musiciany" thing, but I love when composers use counterpoint creatively.

Listening to the TITANIC suite just now reminds me how beautifully Horner employed this technique.

some other faves:

49th PARALLEL - Prelude ; check out the French Horn line. masterful

CAST AWAY - end title ; simple, but lovely rising scale bass line

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST - finale ; the chorale like melody of the saw on top and the string line on bottom is haunting

PATTON - Similar to the technique Horner used on TITANIC , Goldsmith juxtaposes two different themes , a la Ives, to thrilling effect.

More examples?

bruce marshall

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Jerome Moross was a genius at it!

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   Agent Norman Newman   (Member)

The counterpoint in the Supergirl overture sticks out to me. Awesome stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Listening to the TITANIC suite just now reminds me how beautifully Horner employed this technique.

Are you thinking of the "My Heart Will Go On" theme against the bagpipe theme thingie? If so, I agree. That's very clever right there!

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 1:04 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Listening to the TITANIC suite just now reminds me how beautifully Horner employed this technique.

Are you thinking of the "My Heart Will Go On" theme against the bagpipe theme thingie? If so, I agree. That's very clever right there!


bagpipe "thingie"=? Thor you REALLY need to take some music classes. LOL!

but yes that's it>

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

The End Credits piece from Gremlins 2. Wonderful!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   Ectoplasm   (Member)

7:25-8:25 in the opening track for The Perfect Storm (James Horner). It's a long track and when I think I heard all there is to it, Horner pitches the two main themes one against the other in a very melodic way (for lack of a better expression). Anyway, I like it smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

The counterpoint in LUST, CAUTION is fantastic.

Of course, my personal favourite short demonstration of the technique will probably always be Borodin's 'In the Steppes of Central Asia'.

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 2:23 PM   
 By:   SheriffJoe   (Member)

Not from a film, but rather a television show. There is actually a Star Trek: Voyager episode called Counterpoint, which weaves music and story together. It is actually one of the standout episodes from this hit-and-miss series.

Just thought I'd mention that!

Joe

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 2:26 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The climax of the EL CID overture, where the two themes are juxtaposed, with the A theme dominating the first statement and the B theme the second.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=1500&forumID=1&archive=1

I did a thread a long time ago on counterpoint. See above.

I have two that I really like. In Commancheros, Bernstein composes a lovely counterpoint riff the second time he plays the main theme. Same thing happens in Waxman's Mr. Roberts.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   vinylscrubber   (Member)

Ah--gone are the days!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 3:59 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

Ah--gone are the days!

Nearly...

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2007 - 6:10 PM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

I love Arthur B Rubenstein's use of counteropint in Who's Life Is It Anyway, especially the opening credit music. Great string writing.

Also, some of the contrapuntal writing in Return of the King by Howard Shore is excellent.

Of course anything by Williams kicks butt.

 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2007 - 5:29 AM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)

...and finally the master composer for the ages J.S. Bach, The Art of Fugue is an exhaustive exercise in counterpoint. All master film music composers have mastery of counterpoint, and it shines through, making their music compositions rewarding. Techniques like counterpoint seem to be eschewed by avant garde modern composers, along with harmony. What happened?

 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2007 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

Goldsmith's Under Fire, especially the end title, where he weaves his two themes together and they keep building in intensity.

One of the most incredibly-structured pieces he ever wrote, IMO.

-- Jon

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2007 - 11:13 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

...and finally the master composer for the ages J.S. Bach, The Art of Fugue is an exhaustive exercise in counterpoint. All master film music composers have mastery of counterpoint, and it shines through, making their music compositions rewarding. Techniques like counterpoint seem to be eschewed by avant garde modern composers, along with harmony. What happened?

Blah...Bach? What kind of hack is that? We're talking FILM MUSIC here.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2007 - 12:28 PM   
 By:   lp   (Member)

...and finally the master composer for the ages J.S. Bach, The Art of Fugue is an exhaustive exercise in counterpoint. All master film music composers have mastery of counterpoint, and it shines through, making their music compositions rewarding. Techniques like counterpoint seem to be eschewed by avant garde modern composers, along with harmony. What happened?

The Classical Period occurred.

 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2007 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

how could I forget....?

IL MERCENARIO - Morricone

Oh man, that trumpet line!!!!!!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2007 - 2:48 PM   
 By:   internescine   (Member)

Anything by Hans Zimmer.

*Cough*

 
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