Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
This is a comments thread about FSM CD: A Guide for the Married Man
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Oh, how I adore this movie and its score. Guide for the Married Man was one of the first FSM cds I bought.

I'd known about the title song for years from a Turtles greatest hits cassette I'd played to death before I'd seen the movie. The film used to frequently air on the FOX Movie channel in the late '90s and I'm sure I watched it whenever I found it on that channel.

It was a pleasant surprise that the "Williams" credited as co-composer of the "Guide for the Married Man" song was the Johnny Williams. It's a fun score that really brings out the scenes they were composed for and since I've seen the movie so many times, it's impossible for me to separate the score as a strictly stand-alone lsten,msch is my familiarity with the film.

One can hear lots of Star Wars--remember that film? It's seemingly forgotten these days--and Raiders of the Lost Ark-style action cues during the wackier scenes. Raiders, is of course another tragically-ignored movie but one worth revisiting, especially if one enjoyed the action cues heard in "Guide."

The movie itself is a delightfully dated relic and one that will no doubt "offend" many Red Guard Millennial types with its less-than-politically-correct bawdiness.

Walter Matthau and Robert Morse are both outstanding in the movie but special attention must be given to Virginia Wood as "Bubbles", who is not only hilarious in her brief appearance, but who also manages to steal the scene she "shares" with Jack Benny--not an easy thing to do, yet she mops the floor with him!

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I prefer to give special attention to poor, doomed Inger Stevens in this film. What a body! Too bad her brain wasn't all there. She was only 35 when she killed herself. Very sad.

This is a movie I'm really hoping Twilight Time puts out on Blu-ray sooner rather than later, and with an isolated score, of course.

Linda "Nova" Harrison appears uncredited as Miss Stardust in segment with Carl Reiner.

In 1969 a pilot was made for a proposed TV series based on this movie, but ABC turned it down.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

I love that pop tune, I don't have the soundtrack, I've got it on a Turtles greatest hits CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

The film is outlandishly sexist with contemporary eyes, but it was a product of its time. Beyond that aspect, I can't -- with a clear conscience -- say it's a very good film. It's more like a sequence of random skits that are more or less tied to a concept. But yeah -- some individual, standout moments that are mildly amusing.

The score is wonderful in and of itself, one of Williams' strongest comedy scores from the 60s. While the FSM CD includes all of the setpieces and highlights, the C&C presentation does NOT do any favours for the overall experience. It quickly wears out its welcome with all the mickey-mousing and goofing about. It's strange that Williams didn't re-conceptualize this for album presentation back in the day, like he did with most of the other scores in the same genre (most of which are more entertaining as album experiences). Does anyone know why (I don't have the liner notes handy, so I can't check)?

By the way, I've used the opening sequence of this film for my Williams lectures over the last year -- to highlight his "pop sensibilities".

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 7:27 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

The film is outlandishly sexist with contemporary eyes, but it was a product of its time. Beyond that aspect, I can't -- with a clear conscience -- say it's a very good film. It's more like a sequence of random skits that are more or less tied to a concept. But yeah -- some individual, standout moments that are mildly amusing.

You've seen this movie but you've never seen THE SAND PEBBLES!!! Thor, you are a real piece of work! Mmmm! Mmmm! Mmmmm!!!!

Anyway, I didn't want to be too judgemental and piss Jimmy off, but yeah, it's not that great a comedy, but I enjoy it as the artifact of its day that it is. Here's someone that would agree with you though, Thor.

The movie is simply "a series of dumb skits" in Pauline Kael's estimation, and the famous names in the cast are all wasted: "what they do is no more memorable than the plugs for brand-name products that are scattered throughout".

By the way, Thor, I'm sure Pauline Kael saw THE SAND PEBBLES.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Did THE SAND PEBBLES save your family's life at some point or something?

(to your question -- yes, I've seen this and ALL John Williams-scored films).

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2016 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

(to your question -- yes, I've seen this and ALL John Williams-scored films).

Oh! So, you've seen THE REIVERS then? Guess what? THE SAND PEBBLES, much better Steve McQueen movie, and a much better score!

Thor, kids in Norway have to pay to be "taught" film by you?

Must be like a class at Trump University.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 3:20 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I prefer THE REIVERS over THE SAND PEBBLES as far the albums are concerned, but both are good. As a film, THE REIVERS certainly has some values, but is a bit on the "hokey" side for much of it. I wouldn't be surprised if THE SAND PEBBLES is a better film.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 7:12 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I prefer THE REIVERS over THE SAND PEBBLES as far the albums are concerned, but both are good. As a film, THE REIVERS certainly has some values, but is a bit on the "hokey" side for much of it. I wouldn't be surprised if THE SAND PEBBLES is a better film.

Well, you'll never know if you never watch it.

Sorry to be mean, Thor, but you frustrate me. Most older movies are so much better to look at than so-called movies today, which aren't just lacking in artistic merit, but in simple craftsmanship.

Anyway, my problem with THE REIVERS is it's a little cheap production-wise. Set in Mississippi, it was all shot in the Malibu hills.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Sorry to be mean, Thor, but you frustrate me. Most older movies are so much better to look at than so-called movies today, which aren't just lacking in artistic merit, but in simple craftsmanship.

Well, that's your opinion. Personally, I think there are great contemporary movies (both "arthouse" and blockbusters) and great older movies, and I would hazard a guess that I've seen a lot more movies than you across a wider scope of eras, genres and styles. On my to-see list, there is a great number of films (both new and old) that I need to see before THE SAND PEBBLES -- films by the likes of Ray, de Sica, Godard, Truffaut, Renoir, Eisenstein etc. (beyond the obvious ones) before I get to a film like THE SAND PEBBLES -- a parenthesis in Hollywood film history, if that. But not to worry; I'll get to it at some point; if only to stop your nagging. wink

Anyways....A GUIDE FOR THE MARRIED MAN! Yeah, problematic (though amusing) movie, great score, not the best album presentation.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 12:26 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I would hazard a guess that I've seen a lot more movies than you across a wider scope of eras, genres and styles.

Didn't I read you say you're in your late thirties? If so, I've got at least twenty years on you, and I've seen "alot" of movies, more than just mainstream Hollywood "product."

But at least I haven't wasted time watching three season of PENNY DREADFUL! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 3:02 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I would hazard a guess that I've seen a lot more movies than you across a wider scope of eras, genres and styles.

Didn't I read you say you're in your late thirties? If so, I've got at least twenty years on you, and I've seen "alot" of movies, more than just mainstream Hollywood "product."


Yes, but I've studied, taught and written about films for 20 years (as a living), so I'm guessing I'm exposed to a bit more than you. Just to dismantle some of your bizarre "you haven't seen THE SAND PEBBLES, so you must be an uneducated person"-type rhetoric.

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 3:34 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Yes, but I've studied, taught and written about films for 20 years (as a living), so I'm guessing I'm exposed to a bit more than you. Just to dismantle some of your bizarre "you haven't seen THE SAND PEBBLES, so you must be an uneducated person"-type rhetoric.

"Guessing" not exactly being worth much, especially from a Norwegian Swedish meatball! wink

(Thank goodness Norwegians live in Norway!)

 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2016 - 7:05 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


The score is wonderful in and of itself, one of Williams' strongest comedy scores from the 60s.


Agree. Maybe it's because I have seen this film so many times but I think this score features Williams' best, or at least most memorable source music. The "Bantu Cuisine" cue is hilarious and serves as "comedic ballast" in a scene with an amusing visual punchline. Williams' score truly supports the film for which it was composed.

While the FSM CD includes all of the setpieces and highlights...

I'll sound like one of those sexist guys in the film by posting this, but one cue of music NOT included on the FSM disc is the ever-so-brief drum bit used to score the movement of Sue Ane Langdon's glorious backside! If said cue is included then it's hidden within a cue and I haven't yet found it.

By the way, I've used the opening sequence of this film for my Williams lectures over the last year -- to highlight his "pop sensibilities".

Is that what your posts are--lectures? wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 2:59 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I'll sound like one of those sexist guys in the film by posting this, but one cue of music NOT included on the FSM disc is the ever-so-brief drum bit used to score the movement of Sue Ane Langdon's glorious backside! If said cue is included then it's hidden within a cue and I haven't yet found it.

That's in the opening cue, right before the theme song kicks in, right? It's not really a drum bit, but more of a blaring brass outburst over the 'freeze shot' of the bum (at the end of "Prologue/Off to Work"). But hey -- there were many such moments in the film, so I might be confusing it with another.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 4:49 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm listening to the album now and cue #3, "Main Title: A Guide for the Married Man"---the rendition sung by the "Establishment Singers" (my term) has the drum beat around the 0:13-0:15 mark. It's later used when Matthau thinks of Sue Ane Langdon's posterior.

It's surprising that Guide for the Married Man's score had never been released in any format, according to the liner notes, given that many of Johnny's comedy scores had received LP releases back then.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

It's surprising that Guide for the Married Man's score had never been released in any format, according to the liner notes, given that many of Johnny's comedy scores had received LP releases back then.

Yeah, that's what I mentioned earlier. It's rather bizarre. If you have the liner notes in front of you (I don't), does it say WHY Williams didn't prepare an album back in the day?

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 8:06 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

It's surprising that Guide for the Married Man's score had never been released in any format, according to the liner notes, given that many of Johnny's comedy scores had received LP releases back then.

Yeah, that's what I mentioned earlier. It's rather bizarre. If you have the liner notes in front of you (I don't), does it say WHY Williams didn't prepare an album back in the day?


It wasn't up to Williams to prepare anything. The producers decided those thing, and I assume still do. Also, Williams was mostly know back then as "Johnny" Williams of the TV theme tunes to Irwin Allen Sci-Fi schlock. I know that's something Williams fans don't like to hear, but I was around back then and even though I was just a kid, I had some awareness of it. It wasn't until he started doing the scores for movies that would become blockbusters in the '70s that Williams' reputation started to grow, and then really arrived with STAR WARS.

Thor, I guess you're still learning, kid.

 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 8:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's surprising that Guide for the Married Man's score had never been released in any format, according to the liner notes, given that many of Johnny's comedy scores had received LP releases back then.

Yeah, that's what I mentioned earlier. It's rather bizarre. If you have the liner notes in front of you (I don't), does it say WHY Williams didn't prepare an album back in the day?


The liner notes by Jeff Eldridge don't mention any reason; they only state that the music outside of the almost-classic title tune had not been released.

I agree that this musc would have benefitted greatly from an album re-record because the tracks on the otherwise-fine FSM CD certainly don't make for a smooth listening experience.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 3, 2016 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

It wasn't up to Williams to prepare anything. The producers decided those thing, and I assume still do. Also, Williams was mostly know back then as "Johnny" Williams of the TV theme tunes to Irwin Allen Sci-Fi schlock. I know that's something Williams fans don't like to hear, but I was around back then and even though I was just a kid, I had some awareness of it. It wasn't until he started doing the scores for movies that would become blockbusters in the '70s that Williams' reputation started to grow, and then really arrived with STAR WARS.

Thor, I guess you're still learning, kid.


Ha, ha...I'll outsmart you on Williams any day of the week. wink

It would be interesting to hear why Williams (or the producers) didn't opt for an album release in this case, since he had enjoyed a decent success with similar soundtracks for similar films earlier in the 60s. I can definitely hear a good LP program style-release in there somewhere, especially with the existing "setpiece" tracks like "The Globetrotters".

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2017 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.