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 Posted:   Jul 19, 2014 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Can anybody ever thinks of some film composers who have low opinions on some of their own film scores?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 2:06 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I remember Williams talking somewhat disparagingly about PSYCHO in an interview many years ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 2:06 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Ah, I see you meant some of their OWN.

Elfman is always very critical of his own work, regardless of how lauded it is elsewhere.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 3:25 AM   
 By:   Stefancos   (Member)

I remember Williams talking somewhat disparagingly about PSYCHO in an interview many years ago.

Link!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

I remember Williams talking somewhat disparagingly about PSYCHO in an interview many years ago.

Link!


Yes please! More info Thor.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Alfachrger   (Member)

I remember Williams talking somewhat disparagingly about PSYCHO in an interview many years ago.

Link!


Yes please! More info Thor.


He did not elaborate!

"Total Film: Which other movie composers do you admire?

John Williams: Bernard Herrmann very much. Of living people, I guess Jerry Goldsmith [of Chinatown, Basic Instinct, the Star Trek and Rambo series].

Total Film: Which Herrmann scores in particular?

John Williams: Oh, The Ghost And Mrs. Muir, Vertigo, and so many of those things. Psycho was not a great score, but it was very effective."

http://www.douban.com/group/topic/1029416/

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 7:00 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yes, Alfachargr, that's the one!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   Ford A. Thaxton   (Member)

Can anybody ever thinks of some film composers who have low opinions on some of their own film scores?

Often times their "Least Favorite Scores" have vastly more to do with the folks they were working with and what they were asked to do on a specific project as opposed to what they wrote.

I suspect that if you ask any composer who has worked with Michael Mann, those scores are far from their favorites.

Ford A. Thaxton

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Correct me if I'm wrong (I seem to recollect that this has been covered before), but didn't André Previn show a kind of disdain for ALL his film scores - once he became "important"? I think he mentioned something about THE 4 HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE being one of his "least embarrassing" scores. Is that right?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   Ford A. Thaxton   (Member)

Correct me if I'm wrong (I seem to recollect that this has been covered before), but didn't André Previn show a kind of disdain for ALL his film scores - once he became "important"? I think he mentioned something about THE 4 HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE being one of his "least embarrassing" scores. Is that right?

I don't think the process of scoring was something that he enjoyed very much.

His last original score was more then likely the the straw that broke the camel's back.

He was hired to score the 1971 film "See No Evil" (Which starred his then wife, Mia Farrow) was tossed by the producers because they wanted a "Pop Score" instead and then hired David Whittaker to take that approach, which was also tossed and then Elmer Bernstein was hired to do the final score.

I suspect this soured him on the whole thing after that.

He only returned to film scoring in 1975 for ROLLERBALL, which was mostly a classical score he conducted and was performed by the LSO with only a couple of source cues that he penned.

I just think the man turned his back on that aspect of his career for his own reasons.

Ford A. Thaxton


 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Paul Haslinger - Pointman (1994)

(I find that score enjoyable, by the way.)

Hans Zimmer - Days Of Thunder
Mark Mancina - Moll Flanders

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I suspect that if you ask any composer who has worked with Michael Mann, those scores are far from their favorites.

Ford A. Thaxton


I don't think the composers who worked with him in the 80s (Tangerine Dream, Jan Hammer, Michel Rubini, Tim Truman, John Petersen...) had a particularly bad time. I have never heard any negative stories.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 2:08 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I suspect that if you ask any composer who has worked with Michael Mann, those scores are far from their favorites.

Ford A. Thaxton


I don't think the composers who worked with him in the 80s (Tangerine Dream, Jan Hammer, Michel Rubini, Tim Truman, John Petersen...) had a particularly bad time. I have never heard any negative stories.


Goldenthal acknowledges the trouble of working with Mann, but I've never heard him speak disparagingly about either of his two collaborations with the director as far as the music itself is concerned.

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 2:30 PM   
 By:   johnbijl   (Member)


Hans Zimmer - Days Of Thunder



Seriously? It sounds so much like he's having fun! Any info on why?

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 10:26 PM   
 By:   David Maxx   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith on an AOL chat, almost 20 years ago:

"Question: Which were your favorite scores to work on? Least favorite?

GoldsmithJ: Recently, my most favorite scores to work on were 'Basic Instinct,'
'Rudy,' and 'First Knight.' My least favorite score to work on was 'Gladiator.'
Fortunately for me, the score was not used.
"

Entire transcript: http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/forum/displayquestion.php?topicid=2538

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2014 - 10:52 PM   
 By:   barryfan   (Member)

Is Gladiator any good?

 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2014 - 7:51 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Is Gladiator any good?

I love it, but it seems to split score lovers. If you enjoy this, then it's probably for you:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TftCKzlsCY

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2014 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The nature of the work experience and collaborative process (or lack thereof) tends to color composers' recollections. You shouldn't take their comments as definitive regarding the music itself. Miklos Rozsa would often point to THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS as a bad experience. The producer, Hal Wallis, wanted a big romantic "theme" up front. In other words, he was looking for another SPELLBOUND. But that sort of "song plugging" was exactly what Rozsa detested. The composer had no choice in the matter, which is why a secondary theme (for the Lizabeth Scott character) dominates the main titles and indeed most of the picture. Rozsa knew that the twisted relationships between Stanwyck, Douglas, and Heflin were the real heart of the matter but he wasn't allowed to follow his own best instincts.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2014 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   The Juggler   (Member)

John Barry tended to be very dismissive of his scores for movies that weren't successful (Raise the Titanic, High Road to China, Howard the Duck…). He also didn't care much for RUBY CAIRO - but that was mainly due to the producers recutting and replacing huge chunks of his work.

 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2014 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   yonythemoony   (Member)

Desplat has mentioned several times he doesn't listen to his own scores because he hates them, other than certain cues.

Out of the entire score, which was the piece you were most personally connected to ?

I think the « Obliviate » cue of Part 1. It’s one of the themes I’d be able to listen to again, while usually I don’t listen to my music. I can’t stand hearing it, and I tend to think it sucks! So, I think the « Obliviate » cue is a cue that I would be happy to hear again, and, as I said before, the Lily theme in its opening title form would be okay for me to hear again. The rest I’m very cautious about, and I try to be very distant from my work and keep it in a computer or iPod that I don’t listen to for years because I get very frustrated, and I feel like everything is wrong.


HP: You never listen to your old scores. Why?


AD: I don't listen to my previous scores... I don't know what it would help me do. I prefer listening to what older composers have done.

HP: Would you say it's because you are unsatisfied with your previous work or you just don't find it to be an interesting use of time?

AD: A little bit of both. There are so many others to listen to, from Debussy to, again, John Williams to understand why the orchestration sounds so good.

I think it is more interesting the moment when I find the idea, the core melody I am looking for and when I conduct the orchestra. When I hear the music for the first time -- then it is gone. The sensations go away and I have no desire for this music any longer and I move along.

 
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