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 Posted:   May 5, 2014 - 8:25 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Here's an absurdly long article, with too many passages like "Rhinehart’s bedroom is sparsely decorated..." that you won't care about, but if you skim it for the meat and potatoes (so to speak), it's interesting:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2014/05/12/140512fa_fact_widdicombe?currentPage=all

The product is called Soylent, after the famous movie, and they say you can live on it and it's a lot cheaper.

Two points: In my case I spend under $30 a week on food, so it would cost me more to live on this chemical stew, despite the company's claim of great savings. And I suspect that a natural, plant-based diet has subtle long-term health benefits you won't get from a supplement.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 2:51 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Bring along the food replicators already! What's the holdup?

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 3:18 AM   
 By:   Metryq   (Member)

Sounds perfect for any "1.0" types who consider running a microwave oven "cooking."

Now the author needs to dispense with the multi-course, over-upholstered writing style and discover Soylent journalism. Oh, the ferrous patella.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Yeah, despite grand proclamation, we still understand ridiculously little about nutrition and health. If what nutrients are important and why and in what form they're bioavailable is changing all the time, the best solution is a varied diet, certainly not an extremely specialized one where you have to trust someone to have figured it all out.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Well, the fellow has a predisposition to very little desire for food anyhow, so that's to be taken into account.

The main problem with this diet is the lack of FIBRE. That bland concoction would increase risk of gut cancer, if the current thinking is correct.

But it's a great discovery for the likes of astronauts, and could be incredibly useful in famine areas, or as a supplement in developing countries, also for the recuperating sick. Those are the areas for its greatest potential, and THAT's exciting.

And those anorexic people will just love it.


That's one of the strange things: recently UK news carried an item about genetically engineered meat that needed no farming or animals. And all the journalists could think on commenting upon was whether the man in the street would think it bland. The idea that it might provide high-protein diet for starving areas didn't seem to even figure on their sheltered radar.

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 6:23 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Actually, I was just thinking on how this might impact on the 'We are all out of touch with nature' New Age people.

It'd mean that people who are now vegans and vegetarians, who tend to opt for organic farming will now be a little confused. Here's an opportunity to get rid of a lot of conventional farming and meat-eating, that's NOT 'natural'. It'd preserve natural ecosystems too.

They'll be gazumped by the enemy ...

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

In my case I spend under $30 a week on food

How you manage that I do not know. But I solute you!

 
 Posted:   May 6, 2014 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

How you manage that I do not know. But I salute you!


Thanks. It's pretty easy. ....

edit: I posted a description of everything I eat, but then I recalled that a blogger, who did nothing more than that, got into legal trouble a while back for "giving health advice without a license."

Our U.S. federal agencies are known to go after individuals, and prosecute even when no money was involved, so I'm redacting this post. Sorry.

 
 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 3:32 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Another loony diet, & has been said, we need fibre & also a certain amount of fat. I wouldn't say it's a healthy diet, it's a diet for someone who doesn't like food or eating.

 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 6:21 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Mick Dundee: “Well, you can live on it, but it tastes like $h!t.”
It might be interesting to know how they’re doing after 30 years on their new diet.

 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 6:31 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

How you manage that I do not know. But I salute you!


Thanks. It's pretty easy. ....

edit: I posted a description of everything I eat, but then I recalled that a blogger, who did nothing more than that, got into legal trouble a while back for "giving health advice without a license."

Our U.S. federal agencies are known to go after individuals, and prosecute even when no money was involved, so I'm redacting this post. Sorry.


No problem. Better safe than sorry.

 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Another loony diet, & has been said, we need fibre & also a certain amount of fat. I wouldn't say it's a healthy diet, it's a diet for someone who doesn't like food or eating.


Yes, but it has a whole host of better applications, namely disaster zones, famine, medical conditions, etc..

If that PAYS in our world.

 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Does anyone from the western USA seaboard take on extra iodine as a precaution against the possibility of Fukushima sourced radiation saturating the environment?

 
 Posted:   May 7, 2014 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Does anyone from the western USA seaboard take on extra iodine as a precaution against the possibility of Fukushima sourced radiation saturating the environment?

Doubtful. But they probably get more than they need from their iodized salt!

 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 4:28 AM   
 By:   Stefancos   (Member)

Bring along the food replicators already! What's the holdup?

I want my raktajino!

 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Abandon Food for a Chemical Supplement?

Don't the druggiest druggies already do this?

 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 3:07 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Sounds perfect for any "1.0" types who consider running a microwave oven "cooking."
.


Good one, Metryq.

 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 4:21 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I agree this writing style drives me nuts. I don't really care about what it was like for the interviewer to meet the person he talked to.

As for this idea I like it even if it only happens to replace one meal a day. Think for example if you decided to continue eating ordinary meals for breakfast (which for me has been the same for years, high fiber cereal and Greek yogurt plus coffee) and dinner (whatever I happen to eat) and replace lunch with this stuff. I already occasionally do that when I sometimes replace lunch with some sort of protein bar to make up for a crazy overindulgence the previous day.

I also like the examples used in the article where it can be helpful for people in seriously high stress or ultra busy areas where they think they are too busy to stop for proper lunch. Think of the stories of countless game designers who started out subsisting on Ramen. This has to be better for you than that.

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

How you manage that I do not know. But I salute you!


Thanks. It's pretty easy. ....

edit: I posted a description of everything I eat, but then I recalled that a blogger, who did nothing more than that, got into legal trouble a while back for "giving health advice without a license."

Our U.S. federal agencies are known to go after individuals, and prosecute even when no money was involved, so I'm redacting this post. Sorry.


I seriously doubt they'd go after you, given that you're just relating your own experience and not actually advising others on what to do (not to mention merely posting in a thread on a message board rather than maintaining a whole blog or site devoted to such things), but suit yourself.

 
 
 Posted:   May 8, 2014 - 5:23 PM   
 By:   Rexor   (Member)

And I suspect that a natural, plant-based diet has subtle long-term health benefits you won't get from a supplement.

I'm skeptical about supplements. Do multi-vitamins and things of this sort really work? Food is very complex, and I'm not sure if I would want to reduce everything down to a pill, especially when we don't fully understand the science behind everything (or even what the recommended dosage should be for a particular individual.)

Using just one vitamin, Vitamin D, as an example, one can see how complicated things could become... It's a fat-soluble vitamin, so we need to eat fat with it? But how much should we take? Which form is the best? What else is required to make sure that the vitamin is being absorbed? There's just so many questions and so many variables that come into play....

Also, some food can have non-essential, but beneficial, components... I say, pass me the breast-milk. You can keep the formula and the pill! big grin


-Rex




 
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