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 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 1:00 AM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

Three of my Favorite Authors (still writing) are: Anne Tyler,

Anne Tyler's Accidental Tourist has always been a favorite. Can you suggest any others? I've wanted to read Saint Maybe, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)



Anne Tyler's Accidental Tourist has always been a favorite. Can you suggest any others? I've wanted to read Saint Maybe, but haven't gotten around to it yet.


Hi Gregg. Yes, 'The Accidental Tourist' is my favorite of hers as well. But, right on it's heels is 'BREATHING LESSONS' for which she won something (Pulitzer?) but 'Lessons' is just about PERFECT! It was made into an enjoyable tv film for Hallmark's Hall of Fame series some years back with Joanne Woodward and James Garner and it's enjoyable too. But READ 'Breathing Lessons' first. You won't regret it!
'Saint Maybe' is probably 3rd in reading pleasure and then her most recent one,'The Amateur Marriage' surprised me because it sort of goes right back to her style in 'Accidental Tousist', and I enjoyed 'Amateur Marriage' very much. This one was like nirvana after a very long dry spell from her.
On a side note, the tv movies that have been made from her books have been UNWATCHABLY TERRIBLE! Skip them. (except for 'Lessons')

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 11:55 AM   
 By:   Donna   (Member)


ANGELS AND DEMONS by Dan Brown. I read this to see for myself what all the fuss is about. It was an okay book, but it didn't make me thirst to read THE DA VINCI CODE.



I've tried 3 times to get into Angels and Demons. Unfortunately, I was in the doctor's office and my blood pressure was through the roof----violence in that opening chapter was over the top. Not sure I'll ever get through that book.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

Has anyone read JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR. NORRELL?
I'm 200 pages into it, and while fascinating, I'm not lovin' it... some of the writing is a bit too precious for my taste, plus it's taking forever to get things into motion. I'll slog through for another 100-150 pages, but may throw in the towel after that.

Can anyone shine a ray of hope into the long dark tunnel of unpleasant reading experiences?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 5:39 PM   
 By:   Bond1965   (Member)



I've tried 3 times to get into Angels and Demons. Unfortunately, I was in the doctor's office and my blood pressure was through the roof----violence in that opening chapter was over the top. Not sure I'll ever get through that book.



Well I read DA VINCI CODE first (and I felt it was a better book) but I can see how you could have problems with ANGELS AND DEMONS. I found A&D to get a bit too bogged down in the "scientific" which isn't as interesting to me as the "art" that is in DA VINCI CODE.

Both books follow a formula in a way.

James

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 10:25 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

Tonight coming home on the subway I noticed a lady seated across from me reading 'Angels and Demons' and was going to comment to her that I heard mention of this book, but she had her i-pod in use at the same time.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2005 - 11:36 PM   
 By:   MarkB   (Member)

Has anyone read JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR. NORRELL?
I'm 200 pages into it, and while fascinating, I'm not lovin' it... some of the writing is a bit too precious for my taste, plus it's taking forever to get things into motion. I'll slog through for another 100-150 pages, but may throw in the towel after that.

Can anyone shine a ray of hope into the long dark tunnel of unpleasant reading experiences?


Well, I loved it. It was leisurely paced, but that was one of things I liked about it; it took it's time and allowed one to get lost in the setting and atmosphere. That "precious" writing also helped keep me interested, even when the story slowed down a bit.

Should you keep reading? It's hard for me to say (based on your opinion so far), but I'd recommend continuing. The book has more of a "series of events" than a strong plot, but I found most of those events entertaining in and of themselves. (Don't get me wrong; it does have a plot and it does wrap up nicely at the end.)

Mark

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2005 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

Thanks for the comments, Mark... I'll go a little further. Jonathan Strange has just been introduced, so maybe things will start to pick up.

In the interim, read THE ATROCITY ARCHIVES by Charles Stross, a name I've seen, but whose work I haven't read until now... imagine a Len Dieghton novel crossed with Lovecraft - have to say I loved it, and will look for more of Stross' work. Fans of Tim Powers' DECLARE (very similar thematically to AA), will like this as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2005 - 4:38 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Reading now:

How To Make Love The Bruce Campbell Way

by Bruce Campbell of course. Only 20 some pages into it, but very very funny.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 4, 2005 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

Groovy!

Just read: If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a b-movie actor, by Bruce Campbell. It was very funny. It's a re-read as i've had it years.

also reading Timeline by Michael Chrichton, it's fairly pacy and involving at least, would be interested in seeing how the film was so bad.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2005 - 1:21 AM   
 By:   Senmut   (Member)

It's still snake oil.

Lemme put it to you this way...

What's a more reasonable explanation...

1.) That human beings have the intelligence and ingenuity to construct complex and wonderful inventions and works of art

or

2.) That aliens have come light-years away just to carve their own heads over and over again on Easter Island, and anally probe some poor shmoes while they're at it.

Personally, I think that human beings are capable of constructing our own marvels, without help from aliens, demigods or gods. At least I give humanity some credit.

And by the way, you misspelled "Amazing".



Yes, Humans are smart and inventive. However, it really helps to have things like tools to help build stuff with. Metal tools, the wheel, advanced mathematics and ground lenses really come in handy.
And, misspelled or not, "Rnadi" is only amazing for the number of people he snows or intimidates with his assinine arrogance.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2005 - 9:05 PM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

Just finished STRANGE AND NORRELL... and despite my harsh judgement of the first 200 pages, I have to say that I enjoyed the remainder of the book - things do pick up when Jonathan Strange is introduced and the various threads and devices of the first 200 pages start to come together. But it was a close call between finishing the book or throwing it against the wall.

Patience is certainly a virtue - I understand that axiom NOW.

Getting ready to delve into Andrew Vachss TWO TRAINS RUNNING and a novella compilation, TRANSGRESSIONS, edited by Ed McBain (aka Evan Hunter -- RIP).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2005 - 9:43 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

John Irving's latest, 'UNTIL I FIND YOU', is due out July 12. It should be an experience! I finished Michael Cunningham's 'Speciman Days' last night, and though I did enjoy it, I think I can see why it's debut on The New York Times Best Seller list had it right in the middle, and in it's second week - completely left OFF the list! It's probably too similar/wildly 'out there' from his 'The Hours'. The book would make an unusual film if HBO Pictures ever thought to do it, which they won't since no one is (seemingly) buying the book.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2005 - 10:57 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

I just finished David Thomson's astonishingly vicious biography of Orson Welles, ROSEBUD. Definitely not recommended.

And now I've taken up Stendhal's THE RED & THE BLACK. It's much more readable and entertaining than I expected.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   Jostein   (Member)

Storm of Swords by George R R Martin, Part 3 of A Song of Ice and Fire.

BEST. FANTASY. SERIES. EVER.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 6:44 AM   
 By:   MICHAEL HOMA   (Member)

I just finished David Thomson's astonishingly vicious biography of Orson Welles, ROSEBUD. Definitely not recommended.

And now I've taken up Stendhal's THE RED & THE BLACK. It's much more readable and entertaining than I expected.........THE RED AND THE BLACK is good , but THE CHARTER HOUSE OF PARMA , given the right translation is fantastic , hardly know its the by the same author , try it!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   bondo321   (Member)

Finishing up The Complete Idiot's Guide to National Security and now moving on to Criminal Investigation and Extraterrestrial Intelligence (2 books, not one...)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   MarkB   (Member)

Just finished STRANGE AND NORRELL... and despite my harsh judgement of the first 200 pages, I have to say that I enjoyed the remainder of the book - things do pick up when Jonathan Strange is introduced and the various threads and devices of the first 200 pages start to come together. But it was a close call between finishing the book or throwing it against the wall.

Patience is certainly a virtue - I understand that axiom NOW.


Hey, LRob -- Glad to hear you stuck with it and enjoyed it.

Right now, I'm about halfway through Stephen King's final DARK TOWER novel -- I want to finish that before the new Harry Potter comes out next weekend. (Harry will take precedence over everything at that point.)

THE HISTORIAN by Elizabeth Kostova will follow those two. It's supposed to be the hot novel of the summer. Any read it yet, or planning to read it?

David: I'm sorry to hear that SPECIMEN DAYS wasn't quite up to par. I haven't read any Cunningham yet, but I think I'll give THE HOURS a shot. (I haven't seen the movie, either -- and I'll probably wait until I've read the book.)

Mark

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 3:04 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)



Hey, LRob -- Glad to hear you stuck with it and enjoyed it.

Right now, I'm about halfway through Stephen King's final DARK TOWER novel -- I want to finish that before the new Harry Potter comes out next weekend. (Harry will take precedence over everything at that point.)

THE HISTORIAN by Elizabeth Kostova will follow those two. It's supposed to be the hot novel of the summer. Any read it yet, or planning to read it?

David: I'm sorry to hear that SPECIMEN DAYS wasn't quite up to par. I haven't read any Cunningham yet, but I think I'll give THE HOURS a shot. (I haven't seen the movie, either -- and I'll probably wait until I've read the book.)

Mark


Hi Mark. It's funny but Cunningham's 'The Hours' is his (understandible) masterpiece, yet I found it somewhat offputting. I enjoyed his 'A Home at the End of the World' much more. In fact I read it twice, years apart. You might want to start with 'Home' (or not). But, I wouldn't start with 'Speiciman Days' or you'll never read anything else of his, which would be a pity. Let me know which one you choose and if you like it or not! David

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2005 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   bramjanssen   (Member)

I am reading both Wells "The War Of The Worlds" and King's "The Dark Tower" (part VII to be exact) I am a huge fan of the Dark Tower series and I keep relating filmmusic I hear to scenes from the series smile

 
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