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 Posted:   Jun 2, 2005 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   bedhead   (Member)

On the Beach- Neville Shute.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2005 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

On the Beach- Neville Shute.

Hi Bedhead. 'ON THE BEACH' is one of a small handfull of literary titles that I have no problem re-reading over and over and over again. I have always admired this book and every couple of years or so, decide to take it out from it's place on the shelves and start enjoying it all over again!
'There is still time, Brother'

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2005 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

361 by Donald Westlake.
Anything by Westlake is a gem, and I'm pretty sure I read this years ago, but it's a new paperback reissue in the wonderful Hard Case Crime series.

Also picked up the reissue of Jack Ketcham's The Girl Next Door. For you horror fans, I hope you're picking up some of the great horror being printed by Leisure Books.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2005 - 9:21 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

Short stories out of "The Essential Harlan Ellison."

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2005 - 9:22 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)



On the Beach- Neville Shute.

Hi Bedhead. 'ON THE BEACH' is one of a small handfull of literary titles that I have no problem re-reading over and over and over again. I have always admired this book and every couple of years or so, decide to take it out from it's place on the shelves and start enjoying it all over again!
'There is still time, Brother'


I was so incredibly depressed after reading "On the Beach."

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2005 - 3:15 AM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

I seem to have bogged down in DON QUIJOTE, because in the interim I've managed to get through Muriel Sparks' THE FINISHING SCHOOL (amusing, but slight, and not nearly as satisfying as her previous book, AIDING AND ABETTING) as well as Gore Vidal's MYRA BRECKENRIDGE and MYRON (both still hilarious and profoundly subversive after all these years).

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2005 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

I seem to have bogged down in DON QUIJOTE, because in the interim I've managed to get through Muriel Sparks' THE FINISHING SCHOOL (amusing, but slight, and not nearly as satisfying as her previous book, AIDING AND ABETTING) as well as Gore Vidal's MYRA BRECKENRIDGE and MYRON (both still hilarious and profoundly subversive after all these years).



Hi Essankay. What can you tell me about 'Myra Breckenridge' & 'Myron'? I've seen (part) of the film of 'Breckenridge', and have to believe that the book is on another level alltogether.
With Vidal, I've only read his 'The City and the Pillar' of which I found his writing style easily accessable (to me anyway) and found the experience quite satisfying!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2005 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

Received my copy of James Baldwin's 'Giovanni's Room' today from Amazon UK. I said it before, and will do so yet again that the Cover Art-Work of British Books seem to be much more artistic than the American versions. Do the British have a greater affinity for books than other Nationalities? Curious.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2005 - 2:58 AM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

Hi Essankay. What can you tell me about 'Myra Breckenridge' & 'Myron'? I've seen (part) of the film of 'Breckenridge', and have to believe that the book is on another level alltogether.


David, the film is a real mess that doesn't begin to approach the twisted essence of the book. That Hollywood would even attempt to make a film of MYRA is fairly mindboggling. I guess it reflects the freewheeling spirit of the late 60's - early 70's that such a thing was ever undertaken.

The book very cleverly (and presciently, in light of contemporary society) skewers fatuous American celebrity-worship while also relentlessly subverting bourgeois "normality". Gay intellectual pretensions come in for a puncturing as well.

MYRON is perhaps even more astonishing, with its goofy sci-fi time-travel aspect and more pointed political satire.

Myra the character is demented and subversive, but ultimately more appealing than the creepy and conniving conformistas who make up the "normal" world.



With Vidal, I've only read his 'The City and the Pillar' of which I found his writing style easily accessable (to me anyway) and found the experience quite satisfying!


Both MYRA and MYRON are very accessible and compulsively readable. I hadn't read them in thirty years, but reading them again was like doing so for the first time and I couldn't put them down (sorry, DON QUIJOTE).

On the other hand, I've always had a hard time with Vidal's historical novels. In fact, I've never been able to finish a single one.

Maybe it's time to give them a second try as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2005 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

Thanks, Essankay! I think you're right about Vidal's Historical Books of which apparantly he excells extremely well. I've not read one, but I have done my own 'private test' to try to determine weather or not I'd find the reading an enjoyable experience. (I simply open up to any random page and attempt read that page. If it's not particularly enveloping to me, I put it back on the Store's bookshelf). Which is why I've also had my own problems with Cervantes (!)
But I'll definately take a look at 'Myron' and 'Myra' in a few weeks. At present I have 'Giovanni's Room' and then Cunningham's 'Specimen Days' lined up. But thanks for the tips - appreciated!

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2005 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

THE BRADBURY CHRONICLES

A new bio 'bout my fave author.
A better title: MARS IS HEAVEN

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2005 - 1:45 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

I've been reading "The Road To Samarkand" by GLoria Jahoda (a biography of Frederick Delius).

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   w-dervish   (Member)

I just received the following half.com purchase in the mail:

"Worse than Watergate" by John W. Dean.

I have so far only read the preface. It is a former library book. I wonder why a library would get rid of a fairly new book (published 2004)?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

The Avenger by Frederick Forsyth.

Shadowy operative for hire goes after Bosnian killer who murdered grandson of rich Canadian. CIA officer tries to prevent the hit because the Bosnian is helping the CIA track down Osama Bin Laden (takes place before 9/11, written in 2003).

Most of the book is fiction.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 3:51 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

I just received the following half.com purchase in the mail:

"Worse than Watergate" by John W. Dean.

I have so far only read the preface. It is a former library book. I wonder why a library would get rid of a fairly new book (published 2004)?


I actually found a fairly expensive reference book I needed on Amazon used sales for about $25.00. It was sold by Friends of some library system. Library didn't need it, and I benefited. Otherwise, I would have had to spend days in the library reading the book for the information I needed.

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

ONCE UPON A TIME IN ITALY: The westerns of Sergio Leone

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 9:51 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

For those of us who love to read, feel free to share with us what you've just read and what's next on your list to read!
I just finished Welles 'The War of the Worlds' and his 'The Invisible Man' and Gore Vidal's 'The City and the Pillar'. Up next is Michael Cunningham's 'Specimen Days'.
(I think I've become a more avid reader the older I get!)



What did you think of the Vidal? Did you know it has two different endings?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2005 - 10:02 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

I grew up in a house full of books, where everybody read avidly. Consequently, I've got several I'm tackling at any one time. Lately, I've gotten into history; not surprising, since I did major in Classical Civilization.

For the record, I'm reading "The Crusades," by Harold Lamb, and "When Time Began," Book V of the Earth Chronicles, by Zecheriah Stichin. The Stichin is not fiction, but rather an extensive argument that our civilization, going back to its origins in Sumeria, is alien-inspired. Stichin, himself, is a Sumerian scholar, who continually offers up evidence from his own translations from multivarious cuneiform tablets. It's fascinating stuff, but rather dry; hence my intermission with the Holy Land, which may have been inspired by my recent viewing of KINGDOM OF HEAVEN, which I found myself liking very much.

I also have any number of art-related books, which I read along with everything else. Lately, I've become interested in the work of Carl Jennewein, sculptor of the pediments of the Philadelphia Museum, among other works.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2005 - 1:53 AM   
 By:   Senmut   (Member)

"The Complete Roman Army".

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2005 - 2:38 AM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)




What did you think of the Vidal? Did you know it has two different endings?


I enjoyed 'City and the Pillar' immensely! But I'm puzzeled about 'two endings?'. Basically Jim the boy goes all over the world in faint hope of re-uniting with his boyhood friend Bob. And in the end, are (literally). Jim goes out into the Manhattan early morning air in search of a new agenda and what ever else life has to offer him.
John, what 2 endings? Is it there in the book that I overlooked something, or did Vidal have an alternative ending he didn't choose to publish?

 
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