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 Posted:   Feb 22, 2014 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

I can never understand why anyone would prefer LPs to a well-mastered CD form the original tapes, if only for the fact that there is no surface noise and you don't have to deal with the inevitable scratch.

Ray, let me enlighten you. I've had these albums a million years and it's the original soundtracks I, and other vinyl collectors actually crave, complete and in sequence. I adore every one of these albums but since we have the real soundtracks for most of 'em, unless you don't have these records, this set, historic, and beautifully compiled and packaged, is just okay to guys like me.

BTW none of my records have scratches. If so, I'd get rid of it and buy a new copy.

Analog rules!

 
 Posted:   Feb 22, 2014 - 10:50 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

Analog rules!

I believe you mean vinyl. If nothing else it often remains more musical than digital reproduction.

These LP recordings of separate performances to the OST recordings are great. I find they are often more enjoyable to listen than the OST.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 22, 2014 - 11:42 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

none of my records have scratches. If so, I'd get rid of it and buy a new copy.


My Records(LP's) never had any scratches or flaws, but they still had tons of surface noise, which drove me crazy-Thanks heavens for the CD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 22, 2014 - 11:44 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Analog rules!

I believe you mean vinyl. If nothing else it often remains more musical than digital reproduction.

These LP recordings of separate performances to the OST recordings are great. I find they are often more enjoyable to listen than the OST.



I hated everything about vinyl, a music listeners worst nightmare!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2014 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....I hated everything about vinyl, a music listeners worst nightmare!.....

Sorry.....from experience, I can tell you that a music listener's worst nightmare is an old and
scratchy Edison music cylinder from the early 1900s.

 
 Posted:   Feb 23, 2014 - 9:28 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

.....I hated everything about vinyl, a music listeners worst nightmare!.....

Sorry.....from experience, I can tell you that a music listener's worst nightmare is an old and
scratchy Edison music cylinder from the early 1900s.


Good point, the clay discs are even worse.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2014 - 1:03 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Have they been shipped yet, I wonder?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 24, 2014 - 1:19 PM   
 By:   blue15   (Member)

Have they been shipped yet, I wonder?

I got a shipping notice from Intrada an hour ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 9:19 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Elmer Bernstein's film music is extraordinary as exhibited by this Ava Collection. What is superlative too is the sonics, it sounds like it was recorded yesterday. I never thoughts these scores could sound this good- plaudits to Doug at Intrada for searching years for the Masters.

 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Jason LeBlanc   (Member)


Joe works hard:

http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/AVA_b_600.jpg (To Kill A Mockingbird)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/AVA_d_600.jpg (Walk On The Wild Side)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_e_600.jpg (The Caretakers)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_f_600.jpg (Baby The Rain Must Fall)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_g_600.jpg (Movie & TV Themes)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_h_600.jpg (Carpetbaggers)

Mark Hammon
Webhamster


http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6061

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2014 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


Joe works hard:

http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/AVA_b_600.jpg (To Kill A Mockingbird)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/AVA_d_600.jpg (Walk On The Wild Side)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_e_600.jpg (The Caretakers)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_f_600.jpg (Baby The Rain Must Fall)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_g_600.jpg (Movie & TV Themes)
http://www.intrada.net/cv6/AVA/Ava_h_600.jpg (Carpetbaggers)

Mark Hammon
Webhamster


http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6061




Joe's art work is always outstanding.

Keep up the great work Joe! smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2014 - 11:01 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

PFK: Re: In 1966 I bought a reel to reel recorder. For a few days I held a mike in front of the TV to tape main titles etc. Our barking dog would bark, and I would hear barking on the main titles I taped.

So, I went to Radio Shack and for a dollar or two bought a cord with a phono plug on one end and two alligator clips on the other. I clipped the alligator end to the TV speaker inside the TV, the other end to my reel recorder. Not very high tech, but it worked fine.

In the 60s that was the only way to get some music from classic golden age films. Never dreamed 50 years later we would be getting CDs to these films!


Re the cord with the alligator clips, I did the same thing, although I bought my first reel-to-reel recorder and player (a huge Akai) in 1963 in Japan and shipped it back to California. I would also record songs being played on the radio, and occasionally a DJ would jump the gun and suddenly exclaim something like "Wow!" near the end of the song, and I had a marine buddy stay with me a few months who suggested that when playing the tape with friends that I suddenly exclaim "Wow!" at that point so my friends wouldn't know that I had recorded it off the radio. Hadn't thought of that in years! Many years later I would record the entire audio from films that have never had soundtrack releases -- a dwindling few! I have some wonderful things on reel-to-reel, but haven't had a functioning player in years.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 8:50 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Interest on this brilliant collection sure faded fast, at least, on this board??

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 9:10 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Interest on this brilliant collection sure faded fast, at least, on this board??



Maybe everyone now has bought a copy?

It's a great Elmer Box. Just today played Mocking Bird and Walk on the Wild Side.

Big 40 page booklet, lots to read and look at.

In 1964 I bought all the LPs, already as cut-outs for 50 cents each.

GREAT sound quality too! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 9:19 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

PFK: Re: In 1966 I bought a reel to reel recorder. For a few days I held a mike in front of the TV to tape main titles etc. Our barking dog would bark, and I would hear barking on the main titles I taped.

So, I went to Radio Shack and for a dollar or two bought a cord with a phono plug on one end and two alligator clips on the other. I clipped the alligator end to the TV speaker inside the TV, the other end to my reel recorder. Not very high tech, but it worked fine.

In the 60s that was the only way to get some music from classic golden age films. Never dreamed 50 years later we would be getting CDs to these films!


Re the cord with the alligator clips, I did the same thing, although I bought my first reel-to-reel recorder and player (a huge Akai) in 1963 in Japan and shipped it back to California. I would also record songs being played on the radio, and occasionally a DJ would jump the gun and suddenly exclaim something like "Wow!" near the end of the song, and I had a marine buddy stay with me a few months who suggested that when playing the tape with friends that I suddenly exclaim "Wow!" at that point so my friends wouldn't know that I had recorded it off the radio. Hadn't thought of that in years! Many years later I would record the entire audio from films that have never had soundtrack releases -- a dwindling few! I have some wonderful things on reel-to-reel, but haven't had a functioning player in years.




Ron, I was in Japan in the Navy in 1970. I bought a then state-of-the-art Kenwood receiver and Sansui speakers etc. 44 years later, I'm still using this system! They built them to last back then.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 9:51 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

This set is PHENOMENAL (yes, YELLING THAT!).

Sounds great, looks great, IS great.

Apart from The Carpetbaggers, which I heard on the previous Intrada release, it's all new to me (as far as the albums go).

There aren't enough adjectives to describe how awesome this release is.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 11:14 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

This set is PHENOMENAL (yes, YELLING THAT!).

Sounds great, looks great, IS great.

Apart from The Carpetbaggers, which I heard on the previous Intrada release, it's all new to me (as far as the albums go).

There aren't enough adjectives to describe how awesome this release is.


The Ava TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is my favorite film music recording ever. Two cues, "Footsteps in the Dark" and "Scout and Boo," in particular blow me away. Haunting, poignant, really no words to capture what's there both in the music itself and the feathery touch of the instrumental performances. Magic! So glad that film music fans younger than myself finally have a chance to hear these Elmer Bernstein scores, from the very tip top of his most creative period. (You should avail yourself of the Kritzerland release of SUMMER AND SMOKE, if you don't already have it, for more of same.)

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2014 - 12:21 AM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

(You should avail yourself of the Kritzerland release of SUMMER AND SMOKE, if you don't already have it, for more of same.)

Oh yeah, SUMMER AND SMOKE rocked my world. The amazing Kritzerland release inspired me to seek out the film , which I absolutely loved (I've lost count how many films I've discovered via Kritzerland's releases, A PLACE IN THE SUN begin another fave that immediately comes to mind).

Since I wasn't around to appreciate these films and scores they were originally released, I consider myself very fortunate to live in an era when both are available to enjoy for those who wish to seek them out. These are great times, indeed.

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2014 - 5:06 AM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

I still haven't stopped listening to these discs. The sound quality is outstanding, and I'm glad to finally have these on CD; I had several on vinyl and Baby, the Rain Must Fall on cassette.

 
 Posted:   Mar 12, 2014 - 2:49 AM   
 By:   Chris1770   (Member)

Observations and questions out of curiosity:

As far as I understand it, Intrada licensed the tapes from Time Records, Inc. (with thanks to Mia Apatow and Don Hyde, see booklet p. 39).

It seems odd to me, that Intrada didn't go into this with further explanations. Ususally they clearly state where exactly they got their tapes from. In this case, you have to check the album credits to get a hint.

"Who" is Time Records, Inc.?

I can't find any information about them on the world wide web.

How did Time Records, Inc. get the tapes and rights to this?

Was there any business relation with Charles Jourdan?

---------------

On a sideline, I hope the other film related music that was released in the 1990's on the "Mainstream" CDs in order to get a bit of a longer playing time will also get decent rereleases by Intrada. I am not just thinking of "David & Lisa" or "The Trouble With Angels" albums.

 
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