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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Nightwatch/Killer by Night
 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2011 - 5:52 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

. . . I wonder if 'Nightwatch' would be as well remembered a show if things had gone the other way...


Another thing to ponder is what would have happened to "All in the Family" which started airing in 1968.
Would Archie Bunker have been played by someone else?

Looks like "Nightwatch" aired as a TV movie in 1964 under the title "Nightmare in Chicago."

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058406/

Listed among the cast was John A. Alonzo who, in addition to acting in TV and film for almost a decade,
became one of the great cinematographers ("Chinatown," "Scarface," "Star Trek: Generations").

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2011 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)


Looks like "Nightwatch" aired as a TV movie in 1964 under the title "Nightmare in Chicago."

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058406/

Listed among the cast was John A. Alonzo who, in addition to acting in TV and film for almost a decade,
became one of the great cinematographers ("Chinatown," "Scarface," "Star Trek: Generations").


No, it isn't the same:
from FSM description:
Altman's final Kraft Suspense episode had been "Once Upon a Savage Night" (later released theatrically as Nightmare in Chicago)
(...)
After forming his own production company, Altman pitched a pilot for another series to be shot at night on location near the Great Lakes, at first dubbed Chicago, Chicago, but later retitled Nightwatch.

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2011 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Well, "Nightmare in Chicago" also has a John Williams score (according to IMDB),
so perhaps there's ANOTHER early Altman/Williams collaboration to be unearthed.

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2011 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Looks like "Nightwatch" aired as a TV movie in 1964 under the title "Nightmare in Chicago."

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058406/

Listed among the cast was John A. Alonzo who, in addition to acting in TV and film for almost a decade,
became one of the great cinematographers ("Chinatown," "Scarface," "Star Trek: Generations").


No, it isn't the same:
from FSM description:
Altman's final Kraft Suspense episode had been "Once Upon a Savage Night" (later released theatrically as Nightmare in Chicago)
(...)
After forming his own production company, Altman pitched a pilot for another series to be shot at night on location near the Great Lakes, at first dubbed Chicago, Chicago, but later retitled Nightwatch.


Jeff Eldridge knows this best of anyone, but Nightmare in Chicago and Nightwatch are separate productions. However, their credits have gotten mixed up over the years, and the errors perpetuated on imdb, etc.

Lukas

 
 Posted:   Nov 4, 2011 - 7:28 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Glad to contribute to the confusion. wink

 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2011 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

delete

 
 Posted:   Nov 6, 2011 - 5:49 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)


After FSM goes bye-bye, I doubt we'll see any other label produce unreleased Jones scores. frown


Not good! frown

Surely this one deserves a release:



 
 
 Posted:   Nov 6, 2011 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   zippy   (Member)

I agree, Peter!

What's the deal with RCA Victor Lp's?

Perhaps RCA stands for Really Can't Authorize!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 6, 2011 - 10:26 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

What's the deal with RCA Victor Lp's?

Perhaps RCA stands for Really Can't Authorize!



That does seem to be the case. Domestically, RCA has issued the Elvis Presley song-tracks and some of its more popular Henry Mancini LPs, and allowed RCA Spain to issue the rest of the Mancinis, in addition to other soundtracks. As hainseshisway explained during the release of "Summer and Smoke" (originally on an RCA LP), many of the RCA LP licenses were "in perpetuity." That makes it difficult for anyone other than RCA to issue the albums without some real heavy-duty negotiations. Even so, of the more than 50 remaining RCA soundtrack LPs that RCA hasn't issued, a few have snuck through. Intrada issued "In Harm's Way" in mid-2009. And Disques CinéMusique managed to release Georges Auric's "Bonjour, Tristesse" in early 2010.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2011 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   Luc Van der Eeken   (Member)

I was so busy listening to John Williams' (fabulous) Tintin score that I almost forgot about this one (it arrived monday). I finally put it in the CD player this morning and boy, I was not dissapointed! I had never heard of this film (or score for that matter) but it delivers in a big way. It just confirms once again why this man has always been and still is my favourite composer. He's in a league of his own.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2011 - 11:16 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I was so busy listening to John Williams' (fabulous) Tintin score that I almost forgot about this one (it arrived monday). I finally put it in the CD player this morning and boy, I was not dissapointed! I had never heard of this film (or score for that matter) but it delivers in a big way. It just confirms once again why this man has always been and still is my favourite composer. He's in a league of his own.

Yeah, I've been listening to that lately too. It's really good, one of the good dramatic efforts he did in the 60's that wasn't only 'sturm-und-drang'. Some really cool, funky jazz things going on without being TOO modernistic.

Williams' tv stuff is a vast jungle of gems just waiting to be found and enjoyed. Just when you think you have total control of his output, something new appears.

 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2011 - 11:24 AM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

Don't forget to enter the Something Wicked this Way Comes (Delerue) giveaway. Ends Sunday.

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=84541&forumID=1&archive=0


 
 
 Posted:   Nov 28, 2011 - 12:26 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2011 - 4:12 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

Does anyone know where can I watch "Nightwatch"?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 22, 2012 - 10:04 AM   
 By:   Leland   (Member)

The main titles music from Nightwatch is a killer piece.

Overall, this album is an excellent release (although, Q's score is of lesser quality, IMO).

Sadly, there won't be a TV Omnibus, Vol. 2.

Both scores would have fitted perfectly on it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 22, 2012 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I've loved spotting the first runs of things that would become JW staples.
Apart from elements that would later resurface in Black Sunday and CE3K, there's one bit where the percussion sounds like his Lost World goings-on, the timpani gets a good workout and it has one of those great finale/elegy moments near the end.
I don't like the Williams source cue (thankfully located after the main programme) and I haven't really gotten into the Quincy Jones score, but the 20 minutes of Nightwatch has more than made up for that.

 
 Posted:   Jan 22, 2012 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)

Does anyone know where can I watch "Nightwatch"?

At the Paley Center for Media in l.a. or NYC I think - that's how obscure it is!

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2012 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

'Spotting stuff from other scores UPDATE'....

During the first 20 seconds of the track 'Stumbling Around', Williams uses that cool effect he did in his Dracula score, during Dracula's Death, when he effectively says 'THIS IS SERIOUS!!'
I love hearing stuff like this.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2012 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Leland   (Member)

'Spotting stuff from other scores UPDATE'....


It's like hearing early W.'s blue prints.
Nightwatch is a most important W. score.
Great work by FSM.
I also appreciate the extensive notes...

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2012 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

This is what I'd say is, in clichéd parlance, a "slow burner". To tell you the truth it all kind of washed over me on first listen... I couldn't quite get a grip on a lot of it. But there are a large number of scores out there which require to be really seriously scrutinized, and this CD contains two of them. I know I could have filed it away forever after the second spin and moved onto something else, but I think that artists of the calibre of Johnny W and Quincy J deserve more than that. So I made the effort and now I love it. I've listened to it complete, I've listened to it in small chunks, I've listened to it loud on the headphones, I've listened to it quiet on the stereo system, I've listened to it sitting on the big chair, I've listened to it lying in bed, I've listened to it whilst pacing the floor, conducting and posturing. I've listened to it sober and I've listened to it drunk. And now it is part of my family.

As mentioned by Kev and others, the Johnny W is fascinating in how it seems to look forward to stuff like BLACK SUNDAY. So from a historical perspective it has inherent merit. It's also a bloody good score in itself. I really like how it seems to alternate between creepy suspense meanderings, astringent string work and the terrific chase music - even if some of this material sounds more "re-tracked" than extensively developed. And what a beautiful Williams chord to finish on before the End Titles kick in.

The Quincy hasn't really provoked much response, although Thomas (Member) was very positive about it on another part of the board. It's a pity that it seems to have gone underappreciated, because it really is a very fine effort from a great composer. But God I only really "got" it after all the nurturing. Sometimes I'd be thinking "Hey, there's a groove starting up" only to be disappointed when it changed tone after a few moments and went all dark and murky again. But I blasted it through my headphones at nine o'clock this morning, still giddy from last night's partying, and it was fabulous. It IS fabulous! It's not in-your-face fabulous, but it is darkly seductive and works its magic in a subtle way. The beauty of it is in its endlessly inventive instrumentation. Just when you're thinking that it's a standard TV suspense cue playing, you sit up and go "What did he just do with that guitar?" Or that muted horn, or that grunting harmonica or that waterchime... Deceptive, this one. There's actually something of interest going on throughout. The work of a genius, I'd say - even if it's a minor work in the Quincy canon.

 
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