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 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 11:22 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Only four Hollywood films, but I have to be honest and say I have several holes here. I've never seen films like HATARI, THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE, THE MIRACLE WORKER, HOW THE WEST WAS WON, THE LONGEST DAY, DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES etc. etc. -- even though I own soundtracks from several of them.

Also a few I don't find good enough, or that appeal enough to me, to be included on the list, like DR. NO, BOCCACCIO '70.


Thor, among those you listed as having never seen, I can hardly recommend strongly enough that you make a point of seeing (at the very least) THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE and THE MIRACLE WORKER, two very different but brilliant, iconic films with strong performances and compelling stories. Honorable mentions to the others, but these two in particular! I have to admit a sweet tooth for ensemble films based on plays about dysfunctional families in which all the family skeletons are progressively revealed, so I might throw in LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT as one to see as well. (Sparsely heard but enigmatic Previn theme is actually plunked on the piano during the film by drug-addicted mother played by Kate Hepburn...)

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2020 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

There are a number of films in Joan's post that I haven't seen (and probably won't ever see) and I'm surprised at the inclusion of Hatari! - notwithstanding the good fun that it is - but ...
... where is Dr. No?

A glaring omission? Or is it because this is an American publication and the film's release was 1963 in that territory?
smile


Not sure I would have included DR. NO in my list of great ones, other than as the initiation of the James Bond franchise (and of course for the look on Sean Connery's face as he watches Ursula Undress emerge from the Caribbean). But as Joan mentioned, this book does indeed devote a fair amount of attention and appreciation to the foreign films of 1962, not just American films.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 12:05 AM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Thank you Joan for bringing this book to everyone's attention! Your synopsis is great! Where were you when I needed my book reports written for me? One thing I would emphasize is that (from the authors' point of view) 1962's claim to the title of the greatest year in film history was not just about the quality of the films, as stellar as that was. They are presented and analyzed in contrast to where films were coming from, the creative limitations imposed by Code, the Legion of Decency and other social forces, and the ground that was broken by the films of that year, knocking down old barriers and opening the way to an open and honest examination of so many real life themes which were previously forbidden subject matter. Wonderful topic and an interesting book!

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 2:25 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

There are a number of films in Joan's post that I haven't seen (and probably won't ever see) and I'm surprised at the inclusion of Hatari! - notwithstanding the good fun that it is - but ...
... where is Dr. No?

A glaring omission? Or is it because this is an American publication and the film's release was 1963 in that territory?
smile


Not sure I would have included DR. NO in my list of great ones, other than as the initiation of the James Bond franchise (and of course for the look on Sean Connery's face as he watches Ursula Undress emerge from the Caribbean). But as Joan mentioned, this book does indeed devote a fair amount of attention and appreciation to the foreign films of 1962, not just American films.


Sorry, I'm afraid you missed my attempt at being witty! Notwithstanding its delayed US release date, I doubt it was considered either high art or influential, etc. back in the tail end of 1962.

Merely popular ... unbelievably so.
Mitch

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 6:59 AM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

There are a number of films in Joan's post that I haven't seen (and probably won't ever see) and I'm surprised at the inclusion of Hatari! - notwithstanding the good fun that it is - but ...
... where is Dr. No?

A glaring omission? Or is it because this is an American publication and the film's release was 1963 in that territory?
smile

Not sure I would have included DR. NO in my list of great ones, other than as the initiation of the James Bond franchise (and of course for the look on Sean Connery's face as he watches Ursula Undress emerge from the Caribbean). But as Joan mentioned, this book does indeed devote a fair amount of attention and appreciation to the foreign films of 1962, not just American films.

Sorry, I'm afraid you missed my attempt at being witty! Notwithstanding its delayed US release date, I doubt it was considered either high art or influential, etc. back in the tail end of 1962.

Merely popular ... unbelievably so.
Mitch


My bad. One of these years I'll learn to avoid responding to things late at night, when the ol' brain is even duller than it is during the day! Your comment was witty, my reading of it obviously more like half-witty.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

For me 1960 is the top year for film music.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Thank you Joan for bringing this book to everyone's attention! Your synopsis is great! Where were you when I needed my book reports written for me? One thing I would emphasize is that (from the authors' point of view) 1962's claim to the title of the greatest year in film history was not just about the quality of the films, as stellar as that was. They are presented and analyzed in contrast to where films were coming from, the creative limitations imposed by Code, the Legion of Decency and other social forces, and the ground that was broken by the films of that year, knocking down old barriers and opening the way to an open and honest examination of so many real life themes which were previously forbidden subject matter. Wonderful topic and an interesting book!

Thank you, Dana. Actually, your succinct synopsis of this book is better than what I wrote. I also concur that THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE and THE MIRACLE WORKER are films that all film lovers should see. Powerful films!

Zardoz, thanks for your additional films. Paul, this books really is more about films than film music. However, I agree that 1960 had GRAND film scores.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Absolutely by all means Manchurian and Miracle are must-sees for any serious film aficionado, the latter for that and film music aficionados. It's been mentioned here many times that the Laurence Rosenthal score is brilliant for this from-stage-to-screen production. He gave it a very Northian treatment in the psychological scoring dept.

And hey Dana, love your plug for Long Day's...Night. An acting feast. That and The Iceman Cometh for the full O'Neill dramatic treatment. cool

 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2020 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Absolutely by all means Manchurian and Miracle are must-sees for any serious film aficionado, the latter for that and film music aficionados. It's been mentioned here many times that the Laurence Rosenthal score is brilliant for this from-stage-to-screen production. He gave it a very Northian treatment in the psychological scoring dept.

And hey Dana, love your plug for Long Day's...Night. An acting feast. That and The Iceman Cometh for the full O'Neill dramatic treatment. cool


The neurotic "slow reveal" skeletons-in-the-closet pics are a sad obsession of mine -- think "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," "The Boys in the Band," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean," and "August Osage County" to name but a few. Throw in a few Tennessee Williams titles while we're at it. Sadly, few of these have any sort of music score to mention, Alex North's "Who's Afraid" probably the one most like an actual film score.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2020 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

And hey Dana, love your plug for Long Day's...Night. An acting feast.

Howard, I need to confess that I've not seen this version of Long Day's Journey Into Night. The book raves about it, so it is about time that I check it out. I also admit to not seeing Freud nor this version of Lolita examined in this book. The book raves about Hepburn and James Mason in Long Day's... and Lolita. I'm tracking them down, but I have a feeling all three of them won't be positive comedies.wink

 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2020 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

I read this book over the Summer and thoroughly enjoyed it, especially learning about the influx of foreign films that occurred during this time, meaning your average moviegoer was more film literate than usual. I loved the mentions of the music and various composers, of course, but for me the book did a wonderful job of demonstrated what a banner year 1962 was for cinema.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2020 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I read this book over the Summer and thoroughly enjoyed it, especially learning about the influx of foreign films that occurred during this time, meaning your average moviegoer was more film literate than usual. I loved the mentions of the music and various composers, of course, but for me the book did a wonderful job of demonstrated what a banner year 1962 was for cinema.

Thanks for chiming in, Tom. Glad you liked the book. I was raised in a rather small town, and it wasn't until I went to college in Seattle that I could finally see foreign films in theaters. I found foreign films were braver than Hollywood films when it came to controversial topics. However, 1962 was also a "banner" year for Hollywood.

 
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