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 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 8:32 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

I am sure this topic has appeared before but I want to hear what y’all say. I just listened to “The Map Room: Dawn” and its greatness is mostly composition but heavens to Betsy, the technical delivery of performance to record to speaker to ear... beautifully engineered.

Any other tracks where you feel the recording engineer contributes to your appreciation?

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 10:34 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)



Any other tracks where you feel the recording engineer contributes to your appreciation?




Countless. But if I had to pick one for the fun of it.... the Charles Gerhardt/RCA recording of the Close Encounters suite which was presented as a single track of 20 minutes.
BUT... I'm talking of the LP I had many years ago. Listening to that in a darkened room was wondrous. Straight stereo, but it sounded more three-dimensional than anything I'd ever heard. The CDs (both surround and European non-surround versions) don't come close to the way that LP sounded... or maybe age has dulled my senses.

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 12:46 AM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

Most of the Eric Tomlinson's work has been legendary.

RAIDERS has an amazing sound as does the First STAR WARS film from 1977.

Keep in mind that The recent reissue of RAIDERS on the concord CD had the Shawn Murphy/John Neil remixes over the Tomlinnson' film mixes which were only acurately represented on the DCC releases of the CD/LP

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 2:42 AM   
 By:   siriami   (Member)

Doug Schwartz did wonders with ageing MGM stems in many of the Rhino MGM musicals series - some of the "multiple angles" were mixed into stereo and sound magnificent. It was such a pity that this series ended so abruptly - there must be loads of rarities still to mine from the vaults.

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 2:44 AM   
 By:   JimWare   (Member)

Horner's 'Brainstorm' re-recording (engineered by Eric Tomlinson) is excellent, with tremendous dynamic range.

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 2:59 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)



Any other tracks where you feel the recording engineer contributes to your appreciation?


To give a short, concise answer: no.


But to elaborate on this answer (which is not really "no"): of course, the recording engineer is of vital importance to the quality of a recording. But the best recordings are those where you don't "hear" that it is a recording, where the technicalities are out of the way and you just hear the music. So if I listened to the music and thought: wow, the engineer really contributed to the sound of this, then that would be the opposite of what I would want to hear, namely the music as is.

So while I appreciate recording engineers, their technical expertise, their skill, it is precisely because when they are at the top of their game, the recorded the music sounds so well, so right, you don't even notice it's recorded when you listen to it. :-) That is the best contribution they can make.

So I appreciate recording engineers more "after the fact"... when I think a recording has great sound, I can look at the booklet and read the name and think: well done!

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 7:23 PM   
 By:   johnonymous86   (Member)

I am sure this topic has appeared before but I want to hear what y’all say. I just listened to “The Map Room: Dawn” and its greatness is mostly composition but heavens to Betsy, the technical delivery of performance to record to speaker to ear... beautifully engineered.

Any other tracks where you feel the recording engineer contributes to your appreciation?


The Map Room: Dawn always sounded a little off to me when the high trumpets come in towards the end--the volume seems to fluctuate from what it was earlier in the track. Case in point, the snare drum tapping is barely audible when Sallah is interacting with the Nazis. A New Hope is another one where the recording comes across a little hot sometimes. That could just be the result of the technology of the time. The overall ambience on both of those recordings is outstanding.

For my money, Bruce Botnick's work with Jerry Goldsmith was fantastic. The room sound in Star Trek Insurrection is incredibly lush but tight enough that instruments don't get muddied. Same with Basic Instinct and Total Recall.

On the other end, I'm not too keen on Dan Wallin's work. His scores always sound very flat and uninspiring. His work on Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade sucked a lot of the magic out of the score for me the first time I listened to it on album. I avoid Giacchino scores because of his proclivity for working with Wallin.


My personal favorite recording, in terms of the way the orchestra sounds in the recording is First Blood by Allan Snelling. There are many moments of static during the more rambunctious parts but that score sounds so lush, like it was recorded at the bottom of the canyon Rocky had climb over to escape the cops. It just has a very wide open, free sound. It's kind of hard to explain because I know, technically, it's not a perfect recording. But there are moments that are pretty close.

 
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