Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2020 - 11:15 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Rogers’ “MacShayne” film was a ratings winner, and a little over two months later, he was back with a sequel, MacSHAYNE: THE FINAL ROLL OF THE DICE. In this film, which was a pilot for a series that wasn’t picked up, “MacShayne” has a more stable job, as the head of security at the hotel where he stayed in the previous movie. And he has his hands full. First, he has to take care of the grandson of the hotel's CEO, who is a kleptomaniac. Then he has to try calm down a diva who is going to perform at the hotel, whose bass player is her ex-husband whom she wishes would just go away. And when he is found dead, she is the prime suspect because she has threatened him time and time again. Finally, a senatorial candidate who is staying at the hotel has had his life threatened, so McShayne has to protect him. And the hitman who is gunning after him is making plans to carry out his contract.

E.W. Swackhamer again directed, and Larry Brown and Edgar Struble provided the score. NBC aired the film on 29 April 1994.


 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

I often thought it would have been groovy and far out to have heard him do a turn on, say, some psychedelic rock, maybe.
wink

I liked his voice, and sad to see him go.

RIP

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 9:06 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

An irresistibly poignant moment:

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I often thought it would have been groovy and far out to have heard him do a turn on, say, some psychedelic rock, maybe.
wink



I'm so relieved you're joking!

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

I often thought it would have been groovy and far out to have heard him do a turn on, say, some psychedelic rock, maybe.
wink



I'm so relieved you're joking!


wink

Sigh. I just miss those days of overly-pretentious songs with lyrics inspired by the inward consciousness movement of the day...

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Overly pretentious." big grin

Because at least a wee bit of pretension was required by the typical Stones Altamont attendee. wink

Altamont. big grin My god, that generation.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 12:07 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

An irresistibly poignant moment:




I guessed right. They did use a bit of the Rifleman theme for his cameo. But I was wrong about LUCK OF THE DRAW being the biggest assemblage of old television western stars. I found this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cDfth_ql4A

 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 12:59 PM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

"Overly pretentious." big grin

Because at least a wee bit of pretension was required by the typical Stones Altamont attendee. wink

Altamont. big grin My god, that generation.


I was too young (14) for Altamont, etc., but I guess I'm part of that gen.

I'm binge listening on some of those great, way overly-pretentious albums of those halcyon days: Iron Butterfly, Steppenwolf, Pink Floyd (esp AHM, SoS), etc.

Could a band even DO albums like that anymore?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 1:08 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers’s third television film of 1994 was the conclusion of “The Gambler” series, THE GAMBLER V: PLAYING FOR KEEPS. “Brady Hawkes” (Rogers) has to run to his son's rescue once again when “Jeremiah” (Kris Kamm), now a young man, becomes involved with Butch Cassidy (Scott Paulin) and the Sundance Kid (Brett Cullen). Brady pursues the gang in order to get Jeremiah out before he gets in too much trouble with the law.

Brett Cullen, Kenny Rogers, and Scott Paulin in THE GAMBLER V: PLAYING FOR KEEPS



Mariska Hargitay appeared in the film as Etta Place, and Bruce Boxleitner made a cameo as “Billy Montana.” Jack Bender directed the picture, which aired in two parts on CBS beginning on 2 October 1994. Larry Brown and Edgar Struble scored the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 1:39 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers appeared as himself in the made-for-television biopic BIG DREAMS & BROKEN HEARTS: THE DOTTIE WEST STORY. Dottie West was a country singer who died in the aftermath of an auto accident in 1991 at age 58, while on her way to the Grand Ole Opry to perform. In the late 1970s, she had teamed up with Kenny Rogers for a series of duets which took her career to new highs, earning platinum-selling albums and No. 1 records for the very first time.

In 1977, West was recording the song "Every Time Two Fools Collide" when, according to legend, Kenny Rogers suddenly entered the studio and began singing along. Released as a duet, the single hit number one, West's first. Her subsequent duet recordings with Rogers, "All I Ever Need Is You" and "What Are We Doin' in Love", also became country music standards.

But, by the late 1980s, West had fallen on hard times. Although she remained a popular touring act, West's financial problems mounted. She and her husband filed for divorce in 1990, and he sued her for $7,500. By this time, extravagant spending and a string of bad investments had left her nearly broke.

In his autobiography, Kenny Rogers, who maintained a very close friendship with West, stated he did pay a visit to her in the hospital a few times prior to her death. On his last visit (the day of West's death), Rogers recalled that although he was told it was unlikely West could hear him, he still spoke to her for a considerable amount of time in the hope that she could hear what he was saying.

Michelle Lee plays Dottie West in the film, and David James Elliott plays her second husband and producer Byron Metcalf. Nearly every other country star in the film is playing themselves. Bill D'Elia directed the film, which aired on CBS on 22 January 1995. Edgar Struble provided the background score, but the soundtrack was filled the songs of Dottie West as re-recorded by Michelle Lee. Well-versed in musical theater, Michelle Lee had made her film debut in the movie version of HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING. For a time after the film, a CD of Lee’s performances for the film was available from her website, but it is now OOP.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers also appeared as himself in a second made-for-television biopic about a country singer: GET TO THE HEART: THE BARBARA MANDRELL STORY. In the film, country music star Barbara Mandrell looks at her early career, and follows her career through the tragic auto accident in 1984 that almost killed her, and her ultimate recovery and change of outlook on life. Mandrell portrays herself in her later life, and Maureen McCormick offers a good portrayal of the younger Mandrell.

Jerry London directed the film, which aired on CBS on 29 September 1997, less than a month before Mandrell gave her final performance at the Grand Ole Opry and retired from touring and performing. Dennis McCarthy provided the film’s unreleased score.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 2:22 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In LONGSHOT, a twenty-something tennis instructor/gigolo gets embroiled in a scheme involving seduction and insider trading. Kenny Rogers has a small role in the film as a pilot. Lionel C. Martin directed the 2001 film, which went straight to video in the U.S. Only one cue from Lalo Schifrin’s score appeared on the song-track CD released by Trans Continental Records.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 2:44 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers and The First Edition sang two songs that were prominently featured on the soundtrack for the 1970 Jason Robards / Katherine Ross romantic drama FOOLS. The songs were “A Poem I Wrote for Your Hair” and “Someone Who Cares.” Both make two appearances on the film’s Reprise soundtrack LP. The LP, which also has score cues by Shorty Rogers, has not been re-issued on CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 2:54 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Long before Kenny Rogers achieved pop and country superstardom, he was a member of the late-1960s group The First Edition, which had five Top 40 hits, including "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town" and "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)." This success led to the airing of a November 1970 television special, "Rollin' On the River," hosted by Kenny Rogers and the First Edition. The response was so overwhelming, that it was turned into a weekly music/variety show.

Kenny Rogers in “Rollin’ On the River”



“Rollin' on the River” was a unique musical/variety television program in that it was hosted by an entire rock band. Guest performers ran the gamut from soul and hard rock to country and singer-songwriters, resulting in an impressive footage roster of 1970s musical and comedy talent. The show was produced by CTV in Canada and aired in syndication from 1971 to 1973.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers appeared on this 1978 Perry Como Easter television special.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 4:05 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Kenny Rogers hosted the 22nd Annual Grammy Awards show in 1980.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 4:12 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Although this special aired on 2 December 1984, it was shot over five days in 102° weather.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 4:20 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

“The Real West” was a historical television series hosted by Kenny Rogers, which first aired on the A&E cable television channel from 1992 to 1995. One of A&E's highest-rated, series, it prompted parent company A+E Networks to create The History Channel to show reruns of “The Real West” and other new original programming, primarily documentaries.

Kenny Rogers on location for “The Real West”

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In this Christmas special, which aired on 10 December 1993, five kids from across the country audition to sing with Kenny Rogers in a Christmas show in Branson Missouri.


 
 
 Posted:   Mar 25, 2020 - 7:06 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I guessed right. They did use a bit of the Rifleman theme for his cameo. But I was wrong about LUCK OF THE DRAW being the biggest assemblage of old television western stars. I found this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cDfth_ql4A


Gonna havta watch that. BETTER watch it, what a reunion.

And oh ever notice how much the Rifleman theme sounds like Bogie singing, "There once was a fisherman..."? big grin

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2020 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...