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 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 2:33 AM   
 By:   Dorian   (Member)

Digitmovies re-releases their 2CD of Rozsa's Sodom and Gomorrah, this time in digipack format:



https://www.digitmovies.com/digitsoundtracks/en/products/DPDM017

Digitmovies is truly proud to present – after having produced numerous CDs dedicated to great Italian musicians – the first reissue in digipack format of the CD dedicated to the important international musician Miklós Rózsa releasing in a double CD BOX de-luxe edition of the full stereo original motion picture score from the 1962 movie “SODOM AND GOMORRAH” directed by Robert Aldrich (and Sergio Leone as second unit director). This double-disc set also celebrates the 52nd anniversary of the movie and its musical score. Miklós Rózsa’s name is closely linked to hundreds of scores for romantic and dramatic cinema exploding effectively during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Miklós Rózsa’s cinematic debut is connected to the 1937 British production by compatriot Sándor Korda. In fact “Knight without armor” (“La contessa Alessandra”) was the movie that brought both Korda and Dr. Rózsa to Hollywood, where Rózsa scored a row “The four feathers” (“Le quattro piume”) in 1937 and the wonderful Colossal Fantasy “The jungle book” (“Il libro della giungla”) in 1942, both movies directed by Zoltán Korda, brother of the known producer. Rózsa also scored one of the great fantasy films, “The Thief of Bagdad” (“Il ladro di Bagdad”) directed in 1940 by Ludwig Berger and Michael Powell. After his first Hollywood works Miklós Rózsa primarily specialized in writing scores for the “noir” genre, scoring such classical movies as “Double indemnity” (“La fiamma del peccato”) directed by Billy Wilder in 1945, “Spellbound” (“Io ti salverò”) by Alfred Hitchcock in 1946, “A double life” (“Doppia vita”) by George Cukor in 1947 (for his scores for these last two movies Rózsa won two of his three Oscars), “The strange love of Martha Ivers” (“Lo strano amore di Marta Ivers”) by Milestone in 1946, “The killers” (”I gangsters”) in 1946 and “Criss Cross” (“Doppi giochi”) in 1949, both directed by Robert Siodmark, “Brute force” (“Forza bruta”) in 1947 and “The naked city” (“La città nuda”) in 1948, both directed by Jules Dassin. For the cinema of Epic genre Miklós Rózsa composed and conducted original scores that are considered as milestones of cinema history. In 1951 MGM hired him for the super colossal “Quo Vadis” directed by Mervyn LeRoy, followed by “Ivanhoe” in 1952, “Knights of the round table” (“I cavalieri della tavola rotonda”) in 1953, both directed by Richard Thorpe, “Young bess” (“La regina vergine”) by George Sidney in 1953, “Julius Caesar” (“Giulio Cesare”) by Joseph L.Mankiewicz in 1953, “The king’s thief” (“Il ladro del re”) by Robert Z.Leonard in 1955, “Diane” (“Diana la cortigiana”) by David Miller in 1956, “Ben-Hur” by William Wyler in 1959, “King of kings” (”Il re dei re”) by Nicholas Ray in 1961, “El Cid” by Anthony Mann in 1961 and last but not least “Sodom and Gomorra” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”). Among the other musical comment by Miklós Rózsa the following scores are to be mentioned: “Lust for life” (”Brama di vivere”) directed by Vincent Minelli in 1956, “The world, the flesh and the devil”(”La fine del mondo”) by Ronald McDougall in 1959,“The private life of Sherlock Holmes”(“Vita privata di Sherlock Holmes”) by Billy Wilder in 1970 (director Wilder realized this movie after having the sensational experience while listening to Rózsa’s “Concerto per violino”, a piece on which the score is based). In the last years of his fabulous career M° Rózsa returned to his most beloved genres: to the Epic/Fantasy “The golden voyage of Sinbad” (“Il viaggio fantastico di Sinbad”) directed by Gordon Hessler in 1974, to the dramatic movies like “Providence” by Alain Resnais in 1977 and “Fedora” by Billy Wilder in 1978, the science fiction “Time after time” (“L’uomo venuto dall’impossibile”) by Nicholas Meyer in 1979, the noir movies “Last embrace” (“Il segno degli Hanna”) by Jonathan Demme in 1979, “Eye of the needle” (“La cruna dell’ago”) by Richard Marquand in 1981 and the last movie he scored “Dead men don’t wear plaid” (“Il mistero del cadavere scomparso”) by Carl Reiner in 1982, a comedy but with noiresque touch that recalls the tradition of great American classics for which Rózsa had been the musical soul. Sadly Dr. Rózsa passed away on the 27th july of 1995 in Los Angeles. “Sodom and Gomorrah” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”) from the year 1962 is a splendid production by Goffredo Lobardo for Titanus that continues the tradition of the epic cinema of Hollywood. An international cast was hired for this mega production: Stewart Granger (who was not a newcomer for the epic genre since he had already acted in movies like “Scaramouche” from 1952, “Salomè” from 1953 and “Beau Brummell” from 1954) in the role of Loth, head of an Jewish nomad tribe led by him through the desert to the twin cities Sodom and Gomorrah, famous for the lasciviousness and dominated by Bera, a queen of lust for power (Anouk Aimee), Ildith (Pier Angeli), the wife of Loth who becomes a pillar of salt, Astaroth (Stanley Baker), Shuah (Rossana Podestà), Tamara (Scilla Gabel) and other characters interpreted by illustrious names of the Italian Cinema: Ishmael (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart), Melchior (Rik Battaglia), the Captain (Anthony Steffen), Lieutenant (Gabriele Tinti), Arlok (Mimmo Palmara), Maleb (Claudia Mori) and the dancer twins (Hellen & Alice Kessler). Enormous scenery both of interiors and exteriors of the colossal cities, exotic locations, including the special effects for the destruction of the sinner cities by divine hand: all this realization was done following the approved rules of the Hollywodian cinema. Rumoured is that originally composer Dimitri Tiomkin was called, but he was not available that time because of health problems and therefore he had been replaced by Miklós Rózsa to compose and conduct an original symphonic score for orchestra and choir to cover two third parts of the 155 minute movie. The score was recorded in the studio “A” of RCA in Rome in June 1962. Rózsa has always been a researcher specialized in world music history.

In the case of “Sodom and Gomorrah” he had performed deep research into Yemeni and Babylonian Jewish music so as to create the dances and prayer songs for choir in their original language. Thence the orchestral themes of pure fantasy are combined with motifs that have antique origins. For what concerns the OST discography of “Sodom and Gomorrah”, this score has been issued on 33 rpm long-playing record by RCA in different countries all over the world (Usa: Rca Victor LSO 1076 – Spain: Rca Cinematres NL 43755 – Japan: Rca CR 10023 – Usa: Citadel CT MR 1, album produced by composer Rózsa-expert Tony Thomas, containing six selections coupled with the score from 1968 movie “The power”). The first CD release of this OST in mono sound was issued on Cambria CD 1050 then the original American LP was reissued on the CD BMG special products/collectables COL-CD-6480 (DRCI-2634) in stereo. The first complete and stereo version was issued in 1986 on a double LP set (Legend DLD 1-2). The realization of our double CD Box de-luxe edition was made possible – once again – thanks to the generous help of C.A.M. authorizing this reissue (with a total playing time of 111’38”) of this memorable OST including the 6 rare bonus tracks discovered on the original session master tapes: 5 alternative choral pieces and a Jewish dance piece that were recorded during the 1962 session but not used in the final version of the movie. Despite careful digital restoration and remastering some anomalies pre-existing on the original sources remain.

It's not at SAE yet but I expect it to appear there soon.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 2:45 AM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)

Digitmovies re-releases their 2CD of Rozsa's Sodom and Gomorrah, this time in digipack format:



https://www.digitmovies.com/digitsoundtracks/en/products/DPDM017

Digitmovies is truly proud to present – after having produced numerous CDs dedicated to great Italian musicians – the first reissue in digipack format of the CD dedicated to the important international musician Miklós Rózsa releasing in a double CD BOX de-luxe edition of the full stereo original motion picture score from the 1962 movie “SODOM AND GOMORRAH” directed by Robert Aldrich (and Sergio Leone as second unit director). This double-disc set also celebrates the 52nd anniversary of the movie and its musical score. Miklós Rózsa’s name is closely linked to hundreds of scores for romantic and dramatic cinema exploding effectively during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Miklós Rózsa’s cinematic debut is connected to the 1937 British production by compatriot Sándor Korda. In fact “Knight without armor” (“La contessa Alessandra”) was the movie that brought both Korda and Dr. Rózsa to Hollywood, where Rózsa scored a row “The four feathers” (“Le quattro piume”) in 1937 and the wonderful Colossal Fantasy “The jungle book” (“Il libro della giungla”) in 1942, both movies directed by Zoltán Korda, brother of the known producer. Rózsa also scored one of the great fantasy films, “The Thief of Bagdad” (“Il ladro di Bagdad”) directed in 1940 by Ludwig Berger and Michael Powell. After his first Hollywood works Miklós Rózsa primarily specialized in writing scores for the “noir” genre, scoring such classical movies as “Double indemnity” (“La fiamma del peccato”) directed by Billy Wilder in 1945, “Spellbound” (“Io ti salverò”) by Alfred Hitchcock in 1946, “A double life” (“Doppia vita”) by George Cukor in 1947 (for his scores for these last two movies Rózsa won two of his three Oscars), “The strange love of Martha Ivers” (“Lo strano amore di Marta Ivers”) by Milestone in 1946, “The killers” (”I gangsters”) in 1946 and “Criss Cross” (“Doppi giochi”) in 1949, both directed by Robert Siodmark, “Brute force” (“Forza bruta”) in 1947 and “The naked city” (“La città nuda”) in 1948, both directed by Jules Dassin. For the cinema of Epic genre Miklós Rózsa composed and conducted original scores that are considered as milestones of cinema history. In 1951 MGM hired him for the super colossal “Quo Vadis” directed by Mervyn LeRoy, followed by “Ivanhoe” in 1952, “Knights of the round table” (“I cavalieri della tavola rotonda”) in 1953, both directed by Richard Thorpe, “Young bess” (“La regina vergine”) by George Sidney in 1953, “Julius Caesar” (“Giulio Cesare”) by Joseph L.Mankiewicz in 1953, “The king’s thief” (“Il ladro del re”) by Robert Z.Leonard in 1955, “Diane” (“Diana la cortigiana”) by David Miller in 1956, “Ben-Hur” by William Wyler in 1959, “King of kings” (”Il re dei re”) by Nicholas Ray in 1961, “El Cid” by Anthony Mann in 1961 and last but not least “Sodom and Gomorra” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”). Among the other musical comment by Miklós Rózsa the following scores are to be mentioned: “Lust for life” (”Brama di vivere”) directed by Vincent Minelli in 1956, “The world, the flesh and the devil”(”La fine del mondo”) by Ronald McDougall in 1959,“The private life of Sherlock Holmes”(“Vita privata di Sherlock Holmes”) by Billy Wilder in 1970 (director Wilder realized this movie after having the sensational experience while listening to Rózsa’s “Concerto per violino”, a piece on which the score is based). In the last years of his fabulous career M° Rózsa returned to his most beloved genres: to the Epic/Fantasy “The golden voyage of Sinbad” (“Il viaggio fantastico di Sinbad”) directed by Gordon Hessler in 1974, to the dramatic movies like “Providence” by Alain Resnais in 1977 and “Fedora” by Billy Wilder in 1978, the science fiction “Time after time” (“L’uomo venuto dall’impossibile”) by Nicholas Meyer in 1979, the noir movies “Last embrace” (“Il segno degli Hanna”) by Jonathan Demme in 1979, “Eye of the needle” (“La cruna dell’ago”) by Richard Marquand in 1981 and the last movie he scored “Dead men don’t wear plaid” (“Il mistero del cadavere scomparso”) by Carl Reiner in 1982, a comedy but with noiresque touch that recalls the tradition of great American classics for which Rózsa had been the musical soul. Sadly Dr. Rózsa passed away on the 27th july of 1995 in Los Angeles. “Sodom and Gomorrah” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”) from the year 1962 is a splendid production by Goffredo Lobardo for Titanus that continues the tradition of the epic cinema of Hollywood. An international cast was hired for this mega production: Stewart Granger (who was not a newcomer for the epic genre since he had already acted in movies like “Scaramouche” from 1952, “Salomè” from 1953 and “Beau Brummell” from 1954) in the role of Loth, head of an Jewish nomad tribe led by him through the desert to the twin cities Sodom and Gomorrah, famous for the lasciviousness and dominated by Bera, a queen of lust for power (Anouk Aimee), Ildith (Pier Angeli), the wife of Loth who becomes a pillar of salt, Astaroth (Stanley Baker), Shuah (Rossana Podestà), Tamara (Scilla Gabel) and other characters interpreted by illustrious names of the Italian Cinema: Ishmael (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart), Melchior (Rik Battaglia), the Captain (Anthony Steffen), Lieutenant (Gabriele Tinti), Arlok (Mimmo Palmara), Maleb (Claudia Mori) and the dancer twins (Hellen & Alice Kessler). Enormous scenery both of interiors and exteriors of the colossal cities, exotic locations, including the special effects for the destruction of the sinner cities by divine hand: all this realization was done following the approved rules of the Hollywodian cinema. Rumoured is that originally composer Dimitri Tiomkin was called, but he was not available that time because of health problems and therefore he had been replaced by Miklós Rózsa to compose and conduct an original symphonic score for orchestra and choir to cover two third parts of the 155 minute movie. The score was recorded in the studio “A” of RCA in Rome in June 1962. Rózsa has always been a researcher specialized in world music history.

In the case of “Sodom and Gomorrah” he had performed deep research into Yemeni and Babylonian Jewish music so as to create the dances and prayer songs for choir in their original language. Thence the orchestral themes of pure fantasy are combined with motifs that have antique origins. For what concerns the OST discography of “Sodom and Gomorrah”, this score has been issued on 33 rpm long-playing record by RCA in different countries all over the world (Usa: Rca Victor LSO 1076 – Spain: Rca Cinematres NL 43755 – Japan: Rca CR 10023 – Usa: Citadel CT MR 1, album produced by composer Rózsa-expert Tony Thomas, containing six selections coupled with the score from 1968 movie “The power”). The first CD release of this OST in mono sound was issued on Cambria CD 1050 then the original American LP was reissued on the CD BMG special products/collectables COL-CD-6480 (DRCI-2634) in stereo. The first complete and stereo version was issued in 1986 on a double LP set (Legend DLD 1-2). The realization of our double CD Box de-luxe edition was made possible – once again – thanks to the generous help of C.A.M. authorizing this reissue (with a total playing time of 111’38”) of this memorable OST including the 6 rare bonus tracks discovered on the original session master tapes: 5 alternative choral pieces and a Jewish dance piece that were recorded during the 1962 session but not used in the final version of the movie. Despite careful digital restoration and remastering some anomalies pre-existing on the original sources remain.

It's not at SAE yet but I expect it to appear there soon.


 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:21 AM   
 By:   Big X   (Member)

Digitmovies re-releases their 2CD of Rozsa's Sodom and Gomorrah, this time in digipack format:



https://www.digitmovies.com/digitsoundtracks/en/products/DPDM017

Digitmovies is truly proud to present – after having produced numerous CDs dedicated to great Italian musicians – the first reissue in digipack format of the CD dedicated to the important international musician Miklós Rózsa releasing in a double CD BOX de-luxe edition of the full stereo original motion picture score from the 1962 movie “SODOM AND GOMORRAH” directed by Robert Aldrich (and Sergio Leone as second unit director). This double-disc set also celebrates the 52nd anniversary of the movie and its musical score. Miklós Rózsa’s name is closely linked to hundreds of scores for romantic and dramatic cinema exploding effectively during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Miklós Rózsa’s cinematic debut is connected to the 1937 British production by compatriot Sándor Korda. In fact “Knight without armor” (“La contessa Alessandra”) was the movie that brought both Korda and Dr. Rózsa to Hollywood, where Rózsa scored a row “The four feathers” (“Le quattro piume”) in 1937 and the wonderful Colossal Fantasy “The jungle book” (“Il libro della giungla”) in 1942, both movies directed by Zoltán Korda, brother of the known producer. Rózsa also scored one of the great fantasy films, “The Thief of Bagdad” (“Il ladro di Bagdad”) directed in 1940 by Ludwig Berger and Michael Powell. After his first Hollywood works Miklós Rózsa primarily specialized in writing scores for the “noir” genre, scoring such classical movies as “Double indemnity” (“La fiamma del peccato”) directed by Billy Wilder in 1945, “Spellbound” (“Io ti salverò”) by Alfred Hitchcock in 1946, “A double life” (“Doppia vita”) by George Cukor in 1947 (for his scores for these last two movies Rózsa won two of his three Oscars), “The strange love of Martha Ivers” (“Lo strano amore di Marta Ivers”) by Milestone in 1946, “The killers” (”I gangsters”) in 1946 and “Criss Cross” (“Doppi giochi”) in 1949, both directed by Robert Siodmark, “Brute force” (“Forza bruta”) in 1947 and “The naked city” (“La città nuda”) in 1948, both directed by Jules Dassin. For the cinema of Epic genre Miklós Rózsa composed and conducted original scores that are considered as milestones of cinema history. In 1951 MGM hired him for the super colossal “Quo Vadis” directed by Mervyn LeRoy, followed by “Ivanhoe” in 1952, “Knights of the round table” (“I cavalieri della tavola rotonda”) in 1953, both directed by Richard Thorpe, “Young bess” (“La regina vergine”) by George Sidney in 1953, “Julius Caesar” (“Giulio Cesare”) by Joseph L.Mankiewicz in 1953, “The king’s thief” (“Il ladro del re”) by Robert Z.Leonard in 1955, “Diane” (“Diana la cortigiana”) by David Miller in 1956, “Ben-Hur” by William Wyler in 1959, “King of kings” (”Il re dei re”) by Nicholas Ray in 1961, “El Cid” by Anthony Mann in 1961 and last but not least “Sodom and Gomorra” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”). Among the other musical comment by Miklós Rózsa the following scores are to be mentioned: “Lust for life” (”Brama di vivere”) directed by Vincent Minelli in 1956, “The world, the flesh and the devil”(”La fine del mondo”) by Ronald McDougall in 1959,“The private life of Sherlock Holmes”(“Vita privata di Sherlock Holmes”) by Billy Wilder in 1970 (director Wilder realized this movie after having the sensational experience while listening to Rózsa’s “Concerto per violino”, a piece on which the score is based). In the last years of his fabulous career M° Rózsa returned to his most beloved genres: to the Epic/Fantasy “The golden voyage of Sinbad” (“Il viaggio fantastico di Sinbad”) directed by Gordon Hessler in 1974, to the dramatic movies like “Providence” by Alain Resnais in 1977 and “Fedora” by Billy Wilder in 1978, the science fiction “Time after time” (“L’uomo venuto dall’impossibile”) by Nicholas Meyer in 1979, the noir movies “Last embrace” (“Il segno degli Hanna”) by Jonathan Demme in 1979, “Eye of the needle” (“La cruna dell’ago”) by Richard Marquand in 1981 and the last movie he scored “Dead men don’t wear plaid” (“Il mistero del cadavere scomparso”) by Carl Reiner in 1982, a comedy but with noiresque touch that recalls the tradition of great American classics for which Rózsa had been the musical soul. Sadly Dr. Rózsa passed away on the 27th july of 1995 in Los Angeles. “Sodom and Gomorrah” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”) from the year 1962 is a splendid production by Goffredo Lobardo for Titanus that continues the tradition of the epic cinema of Hollywood. An international cast was hired for this mega production: Stewart Granger (who was not a newcomer for the epic genre since he had already acted in movies like “Scaramouche” from 1952, “Salomè” from 1953 and “Beau Brummell” from 1954) in the role of Loth, head of an Jewish nomad tribe led by him through the desert to the twin cities Sodom and Gomorrah, famous for the lasciviousness and dominated by Bera, a queen of lust for power (Anouk Aimee), Ildith (Pier Angeli), the wife of Loth who becomes a pillar of salt, Astaroth (Stanley Baker), Shuah (Rossana Podestà), Tamara (Scilla Gabel) and other characters interpreted by illustrious names of the Italian Cinema: Ishmael (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart), Melchior (Rik Battaglia), the Captain (Anthony Steffen), Lieutenant (Gabriele Tinti), Arlok (Mimmo Palmara), Maleb (Claudia Mori) and the dancer twins (Hellen & Alice Kessler). Enormous scenery both of interiors and exteriors of the colossal cities, exotic locations, including the special effects for the destruction of the sinner cities by divine hand: all this realization was done following the approved rules of the Hollywodian cinema. Rumoured is that originally composer Dimitri Tiomkin was called, but he was not available that time because of health problems and therefore he had been replaced by Miklós Rózsa to compose and conduct an original symphonic score for orchestra and choir to cover two third parts of the 155 minute movie. The score was recorded in the studio “A” of RCA in Rome in June 1962. Rózsa has always been a researcher specialized in world music history.

In the case of “Sodom and Gomorrah” he had performed deep research into Yemeni and Babylonian Jewish music so as to create the dances and prayer songs for choir in their original language. Thence the orchestral themes of pure fantasy are combined with motifs that have antique origins. For what concerns the OST discography of “Sodom and Gomorrah”, this score has been issued on 33 rpm long-playing record by RCA in different countries all over the world (Usa: Rca Victor LSO 1076 – Spain: Rca Cinematres NL 43755 – Japan: Rca CR 10023 – Usa: Citadel CT MR 1, album produced by composer Rózsa-expert Tony Thomas, containing six selections coupled with the score from 1968 movie “The power”). The first CD release of this OST in mono sound was issued on Cambria CD 1050 then the original American LP was reissued on the CD BMG special products/collectables COL-CD-6480 (DRCI-2634) in stereo. The first complete and stereo version was issued in 1986 on a double LP set (Legend DLD 1-2). The realization of our double CD Box de-luxe edition was made possible – once again – thanks to the generous help of C.A.M. authorizing this reissue (with a total playing time of 111’38”) of this memorable OST including the 6 rare bonus tracks discovered on the original session master tapes: 5 alternative choral pieces and a Jewish dance piece that were recorded during the 1962 session but not used in the final version of the movie. Despite careful digital restoration and remastering some anomalies pre-existing on the original sources remain.

It's not at SAE yet but I expect it to appear there soon.


James,

Is this a hint that you will be re-recording this for your Rozsa title next year!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:21 AM   
 By:   Big X   (Member)

Digitmovies re-releases their 2CD of Rozsa's Sodom and Gomorrah, this time in digipack format:



https://www.digitmovies.com/digitsoundtracks/en/products/DPDM017

Digitmovies is truly proud to present – after having produced numerous CDs dedicated to great Italian musicians – the first reissue in digipack format of the CD dedicated to the important international musician Miklós Rózsa releasing in a double CD BOX de-luxe edition of the full stereo original motion picture score from the 1962 movie “SODOM AND GOMORRAH” directed by Robert Aldrich (and Sergio Leone as second unit director). This double-disc set also celebrates the 52nd anniversary of the movie and its musical score. Miklós Rózsa’s name is closely linked to hundreds of scores for romantic and dramatic cinema exploding effectively during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Miklós Rózsa’s cinematic debut is connected to the 1937 British production by compatriot Sándor Korda. In fact “Knight without armor” (“La contessa Alessandra”) was the movie that brought both Korda and Dr. Rózsa to Hollywood, where Rózsa scored a row “The four feathers” (“Le quattro piume”) in 1937 and the wonderful Colossal Fantasy “The jungle book” (“Il libro della giungla”) in 1942, both movies directed by Zoltán Korda, brother of the known producer. Rózsa also scored one of the great fantasy films, “The Thief of Bagdad” (“Il ladro di Bagdad”) directed in 1940 by Ludwig Berger and Michael Powell. After his first Hollywood works Miklós Rózsa primarily specialized in writing scores for the “noir” genre, scoring such classical movies as “Double indemnity” (“La fiamma del peccato”) directed by Billy Wilder in 1945, “Spellbound” (“Io ti salverò”) by Alfred Hitchcock in 1946, “A double life” (“Doppia vita”) by George Cukor in 1947 (for his scores for these last two movies Rózsa won two of his three Oscars), “The strange love of Martha Ivers” (“Lo strano amore di Marta Ivers”) by Milestone in 1946, “The killers” (”I gangsters”) in 1946 and “Criss Cross” (“Doppi giochi”) in 1949, both directed by Robert Siodmark, “Brute force” (“Forza bruta”) in 1947 and “The naked city” (“La città nuda”) in 1948, both directed by Jules Dassin. For the cinema of Epic genre Miklós Rózsa composed and conducted original scores that are considered as milestones of cinema history. In 1951 MGM hired him for the super colossal “Quo Vadis” directed by Mervyn LeRoy, followed by “Ivanhoe” in 1952, “Knights of the round table” (“I cavalieri della tavola rotonda”) in 1953, both directed by Richard Thorpe, “Young bess” (“La regina vergine”) by George Sidney in 1953, “Julius Caesar” (“Giulio Cesare”) by Joseph L.Mankiewicz in 1953, “The king’s thief” (“Il ladro del re”) by Robert Z.Leonard in 1955, “Diane” (“Diana la cortigiana”) by David Miller in 1956, “Ben-Hur” by William Wyler in 1959, “King of kings” (”Il re dei re”) by Nicholas Ray in 1961, “El Cid” by Anthony Mann in 1961 and last but not least “Sodom and Gomorra” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”). Among the other musical comment by Miklós Rózsa the following scores are to be mentioned: “Lust for life” (”Brama di vivere”) directed by Vincent Minelli in 1956, “The world, the flesh and the devil”(”La fine del mondo”) by Ronald McDougall in 1959,“The private life of Sherlock Holmes”(“Vita privata di Sherlock Holmes”) by Billy Wilder in 1970 (director Wilder realized this movie after having the sensational experience while listening to Rózsa’s “Concerto per violino”, a piece on which the score is based). In the last years of his fabulous career M° Rózsa returned to his most beloved genres: to the Epic/Fantasy “The golden voyage of Sinbad” (“Il viaggio fantastico di Sinbad”) directed by Gordon Hessler in 1974, to the dramatic movies like “Providence” by Alain Resnais in 1977 and “Fedora” by Billy Wilder in 1978, the science fiction “Time after time” (“L’uomo venuto dall’impossibile”) by Nicholas Meyer in 1979, the noir movies “Last embrace” (“Il segno degli Hanna”) by Jonathan Demme in 1979, “Eye of the needle” (“La cruna dell’ago”) by Richard Marquand in 1981 and the last movie he scored “Dead men don’t wear plaid” (“Il mistero del cadavere scomparso”) by Carl Reiner in 1982, a comedy but with noiresque touch that recalls the tradition of great American classics for which Rózsa had been the musical soul. Sadly Dr. Rózsa passed away on the 27th july of 1995 in Los Angeles. “Sodom and Gomorrah” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”) from the year 1962 is a splendid production by Goffredo Lobardo for Titanus that continues the tradition of the epic cinema of Hollywood. An international cast was hired for this mega production: Stewart Granger (who was not a newcomer for the epic genre since he had already acted in movies like “Scaramouche” from 1952, “Salomè” from 1953 and “Beau Brummell” from 1954) in the role of Loth, head of an Jewish nomad tribe led by him through the desert to the twin cities Sodom and Gomorrah, famous for the lasciviousness and dominated by Bera, a queen of lust for power (Anouk Aimee), Ildith (Pier Angeli), the wife of Loth who becomes a pillar of salt, Astaroth (Stanley Baker), Shuah (Rossana Podestà), Tamara (Scilla Gabel) and other characters interpreted by illustrious names of the Italian Cinema: Ishmael (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart), Melchior (Rik Battaglia), the Captain (Anthony Steffen), Lieutenant (Gabriele Tinti), Arlok (Mimmo Palmara), Maleb (Claudia Mori) and the dancer twins (Hellen & Alice Kessler). Enormous scenery both of interiors and exteriors of the colossal cities, exotic locations, including the special effects for the destruction of the sinner cities by divine hand: all this realization was done following the approved rules of the Hollywodian cinema. Rumoured is that originally composer Dimitri Tiomkin was called, but he was not available that time because of health problems and therefore he had been replaced by Miklós Rózsa to compose and conduct an original symphonic score for orchestra and choir to cover two third parts of the 155 minute movie. The score was recorded in the studio “A” of RCA in Rome in June 1962. Rózsa has always been a researcher specialized in world music history.

In the case of “Sodom and Gomorrah” he had performed deep research into Yemeni and Babylonian Jewish music so as to create the dances and prayer songs for choir in their original language. Thence the orchestral themes of pure fantasy are combined with motifs that have antique origins. For what concerns the OST discography of “Sodom and Gomorrah”, this score has been issued on 33 rpm long-playing record by RCA in different countries all over the world (Usa: Rca Victor LSO 1076 – Spain: Rca Cinematres NL 43755 – Japan: Rca CR 10023 – Usa: Citadel CT MR 1, album produced by composer Rózsa-expert Tony Thomas, containing six selections coupled with the score from 1968 movie “The power”). The first CD release of this OST in mono sound was issued on Cambria CD 1050 then the original American LP was reissued on the CD BMG special products/collectables COL-CD-6480 (DRCI-2634) in stereo. The first complete and stereo version was issued in 1986 on a double LP set (Legend DLD 1-2). The realization of our double CD Box de-luxe edition was made possible – once again – thanks to the generous help of C.A.M. authorizing this reissue (with a total playing time of 111’38”) of this memorable OST including the 6 rare bonus tracks discovered on the original session master tapes: 5 alternative choral pieces and a Jewish dance piece that were recorded during the 1962 session but not used in the final version of the movie. Despite careful digital restoration and remastering some anomalies pre-existing on the original sources remain.

It's not at SAE yet but I expect it to appear there soon.


James,

Is this a hint that you will be re-recording this for your Rozsa title next year!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:28 AM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)

Digitmovies re-releases their 2CD of Rozsa's Sodom and Gomorrah, this time in digipack format:



https://www.digitmovies.com/digitsoundtracks/en/products/DPDM017

Digitmovies is truly proud to present – after having produced numerous CDs dedicated to great Italian musicians – the first reissue in digipack format of the CD dedicated to the important international musician Miklós Rózsa releasing in a double CD BOX de-luxe edition of the full stereo original motion picture score from the 1962 movie “SODOM AND GOMORRAH” directed by Robert Aldrich (and Sergio Leone as second unit director). This double-disc set also celebrates the 52nd anniversary of the movie and its musical score. Miklós Rózsa’s name is closely linked to hundreds of scores for romantic and dramatic cinema exploding effectively during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Miklós Rózsa’s cinematic debut is connected to the 1937 British production by compatriot Sándor Korda. In fact “Knight without armor” (“La contessa Alessandra”) was the movie that brought both Korda and Dr. Rózsa to Hollywood, where Rózsa scored a row “The four feathers” (“Le quattro piume”) in 1937 and the wonderful Colossal Fantasy “The jungle book” (“Il libro della giungla”) in 1942, both movies directed by Zoltán Korda, brother of the known producer. Rózsa also scored one of the great fantasy films, “The Thief of Bagdad” (“Il ladro di Bagdad”) directed in 1940 by Ludwig Berger and Michael Powell. After his first Hollywood works Miklós Rózsa primarily specialized in writing scores for the “noir” genre, scoring such classical movies as “Double indemnity” (“La fiamma del peccato”) directed by Billy Wilder in 1945, “Spellbound” (“Io ti salverò”) by Alfred Hitchcock in 1946, “A double life” (“Doppia vita”) by George Cukor in 1947 (for his scores for these last two movies Rózsa won two of his three Oscars), “The strange love of Martha Ivers” (“Lo strano amore di Marta Ivers”) by Milestone in 1946, “The killers” (”I gangsters”) in 1946 and “Criss Cross” (“Doppi giochi”) in 1949, both directed by Robert Siodmark, “Brute force” (“Forza bruta”) in 1947 and “The naked city” (“La città nuda”) in 1948, both directed by Jules Dassin. For the cinema of Epic genre Miklós Rózsa composed and conducted original scores that are considered as milestones of cinema history. In 1951 MGM hired him for the super colossal “Quo Vadis” directed by Mervyn LeRoy, followed by “Ivanhoe” in 1952, “Knights of the round table” (“I cavalieri della tavola rotonda”) in 1953, both directed by Richard Thorpe, “Young bess” (“La regina vergine”) by George Sidney in 1953, “Julius Caesar” (“Giulio Cesare”) by Joseph L.Mankiewicz in 1953, “The king’s thief” (“Il ladro del re”) by Robert Z.Leonard in 1955, “Diane” (“Diana la cortigiana”) by David Miller in 1956, “Ben-Hur” by William Wyler in 1959, “King of kings” (”Il re dei re”) by Nicholas Ray in 1961, “El Cid” by Anthony Mann in 1961 and last but not least “Sodom and Gomorra” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”). Among the other musical comment by Miklós Rózsa the following scores are to be mentioned: “Lust for life” (”Brama di vivere”) directed by Vincent Minelli in 1956, “The world, the flesh and the devil”(”La fine del mondo”) by Ronald McDougall in 1959,“The private life of Sherlock Holmes”(“Vita privata di Sherlock Holmes”) by Billy Wilder in 1970 (director Wilder realized this movie after having the sensational experience while listening to Rózsa’s “Concerto per violino”, a piece on which the score is based). In the last years of his fabulous career M° Rózsa returned to his most beloved genres: to the Epic/Fantasy “The golden voyage of Sinbad” (“Il viaggio fantastico di Sinbad”) directed by Gordon Hessler in 1974, to the dramatic movies like “Providence” by Alain Resnais in 1977 and “Fedora” by Billy Wilder in 1978, the science fiction “Time after time” (“L’uomo venuto dall’impossibile”) by Nicholas Meyer in 1979, the noir movies “Last embrace” (“Il segno degli Hanna”) by Jonathan Demme in 1979, “Eye of the needle” (“La cruna dell’ago”) by Richard Marquand in 1981 and the last movie he scored “Dead men don’t wear plaid” (“Il mistero del cadavere scomparso”) by Carl Reiner in 1982, a comedy but with noiresque touch that recalls the tradition of great American classics for which Rózsa had been the musical soul. Sadly Dr. Rózsa passed away on the 27th july of 1995 in Los Angeles. “Sodom and Gomorrah” (“Sodoma e Gomorra”) from the year 1962 is a splendid production by Goffredo Lobardo for Titanus that continues the tradition of the epic cinema of Hollywood. An international cast was hired for this mega production: Stewart Granger (who was not a newcomer for the epic genre since he had already acted in movies like “Scaramouche” from 1952, “Salomè” from 1953 and “Beau Brummell” from 1954) in the role of Loth, head of an Jewish nomad tribe led by him through the desert to the twin cities Sodom and Gomorrah, famous for the lasciviousness and dominated by Bera, a queen of lust for power (Anouk Aimee), Ildith (Pier Angeli), the wife of Loth who becomes a pillar of salt, Astaroth (Stanley Baker), Shuah (Rossana Podestà), Tamara (Scilla Gabel) and other characters interpreted by illustrious names of the Italian Cinema: Ishmael (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart), Melchior (Rik Battaglia), the Captain (Anthony Steffen), Lieutenant (Gabriele Tinti), Arlok (Mimmo Palmara), Maleb (Claudia Mori) and the dancer twins (Hellen & Alice Kessler). Enormous scenery both of interiors and exteriors of the colossal cities, exotic locations, including the special effects for the destruction of the sinner cities by divine hand: all this realization was done following the approved rules of the Hollywodian cinema. Rumoured is that originally composer Dimitri Tiomkin was called, but he was not available that time because of health problems and therefore he had been replaced by Miklós Rózsa to compose and conduct an original symphonic score for orchestra and choir to cover two third parts of the 155 minute movie. The score was recorded in the studio “A” of RCA in Rome in June 1962. Rózsa has always been a researcher specialized in world music history.

In the case of “Sodom and Gomorrah” he had performed deep research into Yemeni and Babylonian Jewish music so as to create the dances and prayer songs for choir in their original language. Thence the orchestral themes of pure fantasy are combined with motifs that have antique origins. For what concerns the OST discography of “Sodom and Gomorrah”, this score has been issued on 33 rpm long-playing record by RCA in different countries all over the world (Usa: Rca Victor LSO 1076 – Spain: Rca Cinematres NL 43755 – Japan: Rca CR 10023 – Usa: Citadel CT MR 1, album produced by composer Rózsa-expert Tony Thomas, containing six selections coupled with the score from 1968 movie “The power”). The first CD release of this OST in mono sound was issued on Cambria CD 1050 then the original American LP was reissued on the CD BMG special products/collectables COL-CD-6480 (DRCI-2634) in stereo. The first complete and stereo version was issued in 1986 on a double LP set (Legend DLD 1-2). The realization of our double CD Box de-luxe edition was made possible – once again – thanks to the generous help of C.A.M. authorizing this reissue (with a total playing time of 111’38”) of this memorable OST including the 6 rare bonus tracks discovered on the original session master tapes: 5 alternative choral pieces and a Jewish dance piece that were recorded during the 1962 session but not used in the final version of the movie. Despite careful digital restoration and remastering some anomalies pre-existing on the original sources remain.

It's not at SAE yet but I expect it to appear there soon.


James,

Is this a hint that you will be re-recording this for your Rozsa title next year!


Yes I will including the cues not contained on this "complete" recording.....

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:35 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

That's wonderful news, a complete Sodom and Gomorrah coming from Tadlow.

I've been hoping that you were going to re-record this.

I don't want to wish my life away, but roll on next year when this becomes available for sale.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:36 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

This will be a 60th birthday present for the wife.

Well that's my excuse anyway.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Think I'll be happy enough to wait for the Tadlow recording of this one. I've enough to be getting on with and on my 'wish list', and to be honest I prefer their re recordings of these scores.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:52 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

Think I'll be happy enough to wait for the Tadlow recording of this one. I've enough to be getting on with and on my 'wish list', and to be honest I prefer their re recordings of these scores.

I bought the Digi release, first time round, and to be honest, it's a disappointment. I didn't think that the sound was as good as the original single cd release on BMG.

It's a helluva score, one of Miklos' best.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 4:53 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

Double post, sorry.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Think I'll be happy enough to wait for the Tadlow recording of this one. I've enough to be getting on with and on my 'wish list', and to be honest I prefer their re recordings of these scores.

I bought the Digi release, first time round, and to be honest, it's a disappointment. I didn't think that the sound was as good as the original single cd release on BMG.

It's a helluva score, one of Miklos' best.


I have that single CD Chris and I've always been happy enough with it, so I'm content to wait for the rerecording. Personally I don't think it's as good as 'El Cid' but maybe the Tadlow will change my opinion. You have more knowledge than me on Rozsa's music.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 5:05 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)



James,

Is this a hint that you will be re-recording this for your Rozsa title next year!


Yes I will including the cues not contained on this "complete" recording.....



Another Tadlow recording of an epic Rozsa score. Wonderful news!

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 5:29 AM   
 By:   orbital   (Member)

I will happily wait and then buy the Tadlow recording. Looking forward to this, James — thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 7:12 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

First of all, that wall of text, wow O_O

Soooooooo wonderful this is getting rerecorded. The OST just sounds bad (and if that's Digitmovie's fault or not is irrelevant) which some of it, despite advertising, not actually in stereo. But on top of that is simply all the....tearing....of the sound.

But it's great music and I look forward to the rerecording with great furvor.

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Well fellas, now you know how to tease out the secret titles from producers' upcoming releases. You just stick up an announcement that somebody ELSE is releasing another version, and they've just GOT to spill the beanpod re why you should wait. Note that strategy for future specs!

Needless to say I have the Digitm release, and they did really oversample the tapes at too high a volume. The result is inferior to the great 2LP set they previously unleashed.

Tadlow will nail this one. They prefer that era, they love Rozsa, they excel at all the woodwind/perc oriental chamber stuff, as shown by QV, and they have a chorus. Maybe Frank and the researchers can find the source cues for all the Idelsohn numbers at last?

Tons of unreleased stuff too.

Rain stopped play for the first half with the Elamites declaring all out. Nasty thunderstorms on the second day's innings forecast. Let's hope the Hebrews can pull off a few centuries with their top man Granger before the weather sets in.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   Dr Lenera   (Member)

O wow, fantastic news this is getting a complete re-recording [looking forward to the complete battle music], this is a great score, okay it's not as good as El Cid, but few scores are, and Sodom And Gomorrah might be more thematically diverse. I'm rather fond of the film too despite its silliness.
This reminds me I still need to buy the re-recording of Quo Vadis!!

 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I might buy this reissue if they said they fixed the sound. They screwed it up pretty badly on the last release and this seems to be just an identical reissue. I've heard from many people that the LP set this is taken from sounded much better, so I wish Mike Mattessino could've gotten his hands on a source and restored this great score's original recording.

I am ecstatic to find out that this is the next Rozsa rerecording from Tadlow! I know some out there wan the moors and I do too but this is really one of Rozsa's very best scores despite the movie and it deserves a great complete recording (and the Digitmovies both sounds bad and is incomplete, missing some key cues).

Thanks James! I hope a lot of people hold out for your version; that's definitely my advice!

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)

I might buy this reissue if they said they fixed the sound. They screwed it up pretty badly on the last release and this seems to be just an identical reissue. I've heard from many people that the LP set this is taken from sounded much better, so I wish Mike Mattessino could've gotten his hands on a source and restored this great score's original recording.

I am ecstatic to find out that this is the next Rozsa rerecording from Tadlow! I know some out there wan the moors and I do too but this is really one of Rozsa's very best scores despite the movie and it deserves a great complete recording (and the Digitmovies both sounds bad and is incomplete, missing some key cues).

Thanks James! I hope a lot of people hold out for your version; that's definitely my advice!

Yavar


In my research I have had the "pleasure" of watching SODOM about 12 times!!!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   miguel   (Member)

The "River Pastorale" cue is one of my favourite Rozsa's ever. I have this 2cd edition of the original recording, but it's such poor sound that you'll be making me really happy to have a new recording, Mr Fitzpatrick. You already did with the Quo Vadis concert suite. Congratulations and my sincere thanks.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 17, 2014 - 8:52 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Yup, I bought this the first time round, but the sound's pretty ropey & I didn't keep it. While you're waiting for the new recording, you're much better off buying the single CD on BMG Collectables.

 
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