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Conquest of/Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1972/1973)
Music by Leonard Rosenman, Tom Scott
Conquest of/Battle for the Planet of the Apes Conquest of/Battle for the Planet of the Apes Conquest of/Battle for the Planet of the Apes
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: February 2001
Catalog #: Vol. 4, No. 1
# of Discs: 1

Finally—complete your Apes collection! In 2000 we released Leonard Rosenman's masterpiece sci-fi score to Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), complete with the LP re-recording issued at the time of the film. (Jerry Goldsmith's scores to 1968's Planet of the Apes and 1971's Escape from the Planet of the Apes are available on CD from Varese Sarabande.) Now, get the scores to the fourth and fifth films by Tom Scott and Leonard Rosenman, respectively.

Conquest for the Planet of the Apes (1972) is the darkest film in the series, set in futuristic and fascist 1991 where humans have forced apes into slavery. Cornelius' son Caesar (also played by Roddy McDowall) rallies the apes into a fighting force that takes over the society in a violent allegory of the then-recent Watts riots. Jazz musician and film composer Tom Scott—then only 24 years old—updated the Apes sound into a harsh and slightly more contemporary feel, writing a memorably rhythmic main title and aggressive brass licks for the climactic ape riots. This CD features his complete Conquest score as heard in the picture plus numerous cues which were dropped from the film and have never before been heard—including his original seven-minute finale, eliminated when a revised ending was concocted in the editing room. The Conquest tracks on this CD are a combination of stereo and mono.

Leonard Rosenman returned to the series for Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973), reprising his atonal, challenging symphonic sound from the second film but writing new themes and motifs. The main title is a long, powerful and uptempo march for gorilla general Aldo's horseback ride into the camp where apes and humans have made a tentative peace. The score also includes numerous action cues, deranged acoustic and electronic effects for the mutant human enemies, and—a rarity for the Apes series—moments of genuine melody and warmth, including the optimistic end title. The complete score is presented here, in stereo.

As a final bonus, the CD includes Lalo Schifrin's main title to the short-lived Apes TV show from 1974—an aggressive 70-second piece (in mono) firmly in the atonal Apes mold but shot through with the composer's own style.

Leonard Rosenman Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Leonard Rosenman (1924-2008) was an accomplished 20th century American composer with a major career in film and television. He was an up-and-coming New York concert composer when his friendship with James Dean lead to his groundbreaking 1955 scores for East of Eden and Rebel Without a Cause; his score for The Cobweb that same year is acknowledged as the first to be based on twelve-tone music. His other film projects include Fantastic Voyage, the 1978 Lord of the Rings, Cross Creek and Star Trek IV; his television work includes Combat, Marcus Welby, M.D. and Sybil. Rosenman made no apologies for his modernist style and was outspoken about using his film projects as testing grounds for concert works. IMDB

Tom Scott Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Tom Scott (b. 1948) is perhaps best known as a Grammy-winning saxophonist and bandleader, but he had a vibrant film and TV scoring career mostly in the 1970s and '80s, scoring feature films like Conquest of the Planet of the Apes and TV series such as The Streets of San Francisco, Starsky and Hutch and Family TiesIMDB

Comments (25):Log in or register to post your own comments
Tom Scott's CONQUEST of the POTA has proven to be the gem of this Apes two-fer. I love the avant-garde approach that fits right in alongside the Goldsmith and Rosenman efforts. It's great how each composer adapted their individual style to the Goldsmith original. There's no doubt which movie series these scores come from. When I first got this CD eight years ago it was for the Rosenman theme for BATTLE that I loved, but it's the Scott work that I keep coming back to.

I'd even place it second after the Goldsmith, at least in terms of a stand-alone listen, since much of Scott's score was omitted from the film.

The strange thing is about CONQUEST is that I never knew it existed until the 1990s! I was only a year old in 1972, so I never saw this in a theater, and It never got aired on TV when I was a kid.

Tom Scott's CONQUEST of the POTA has proven to be the gem of this Apes two-fer. I love the avant-garde approach that fits right in alongside the Goldsmith and Rosenman efforts. It's great how each composer adapted their individual style to the Goldsmith original. There's no doubt which movie series these scores come from. When I first got this CD eight years ago it was for the Rosenman theme for BATTLE that I loved, but it's the Scott work that I keep coming back to.

I'd even place it second after the Goldsmith, at least in terms of a stand-alone listen, since much of Scott's score was omitted from the film.

The strange thing is about CONQUEST is that I never knew it existed until the 1990s! I was only a year old in 1972, so I never saw this in a theater, and It never got aired on TV when I was a kid.[/endquote]


I watched the 1974 Apes series in the mid-Seventies and in the late Seventies, the entire Apes film saga was broadcast on television.
I watched them in black and white but the mood (part military, part avant garde, part ethnic: modernist totalitarian tribal soundscape) created by the music never left me.

Hear the main title from CONQUEST:
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/store/MP3/0401/01_MAIN_TITLE.MP3

CONQUEST trailer.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcW0rnztGsc[/youtube]

133 views of this thread and only one response???

I didn't know that there was a TV series until I realized those "new" movies that my local channel used to air in the early eighties were two episodes edited together as "movies": Farewell to the Planet of the Apes, etc. Yet CONQUEST was completely unknown to me. Maybe the dark tone and violence were too much a contrast with the rest of the series.

Anyway, Tom Scott's score is great stuff. And a score like his could've only happened in the late-60s/ early 70s time frame.

I love all the APES scores and will forever by glad that FSM got the Rosenman and Scott scores preserved on disc. I remember simply being ecstatic in '97 when Varese released the full score for the original plus that generous suite from ESCAPE. They have long been major favorites of mine. Just from viewing the rest of the films, I failed to fully appreciate the non-Jerry scores, but they are great in their own ways while still paying homage to the original score's instrumentation and style. Rosenman fits perfectly within the APES series, his daring & avant garde style fulfilling the same function as Goldsmith's but in a completely different manner. Scott's score has some fine elements for sure and while I do enjoy listening to it, I still rank it below the other four scores.

Now this is still ranked #5 out of five, so it's not too awful! I wouldn't expect many new composers to be able to compete with the pure awesomeness of POTA, ESCAPE and BENEATH... :)

I would totally agree with you Tom, I love these scores but would put Conquest 5th and I really enjoyed listening to them isolated on the blu rays.
As for keeping in with the style set by Jerry, I was recently listening to intrada's cd of the TV series music and Lalo Schifrin also did a pretty good job of keeping the correct 'tone' in the music while keeping it in his own dramatic style. Well done to all the composers concerned.

FOOTNOTE: the last time I saw Jerry conduct was at the Albert Hall where he played his POTA suite. His introduction gave away (surprisingly) that he was more than a little pissed at not being asked to score the Tim Burton remake!

Double Post (Apologies)

I love all the APES scores and will forever by glad that FSM got the Rosenman and Scott scores preserved on disc.[/endquote]

Agreed. The Apes scores were mostly a blind buy for me since I wasn't familiar with the sequel movies at the time (I've since bought the box set) and I *love* the music to these films!

Just got to watch the BluRay release of CONQUEST - for those interested, Scott's score is indeed intact. Goldsmith's cue is still used at the end of the picture, but what's surprising is that there was MORE that was used.

Recommend the picture, but I can see why they backed off - it could've caused riots on its own.

Speaking of APES, Lalo Schifrin, and the like... I noticed that Lalo "borrowed" from himself for his POTA TV series theme, the horn riff is used in several sixth season Mission: Impossible episodes. Just noticed that recently. :o

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits
For more specific musician lists for the scores on this album, go here:
Battle For The Planet of the Apes
Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes

Leader (Conductor):
Leonard Rosenman, Thomas W. Scott

Cello:
Margaret Aue-Van Wyck, Joseph DiTullio, Marie Fera, Dennis Karmazyn, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Edgar Lustgarten, Eleanor Slatkin

Bass:
Charles L. Domanico, Milton Kestenbaum, Abraham Luboff, Peter A. Mercurio, Buell Neidlinger

Flute:
Luella Howard, Abe Most, C. E. "Bud" Shank, Sheridon W. Stokes

Oboe:
John F. Ellis, Gordon Pope

Clarinet:
Russell Cheever, Gene Cipriano, Dominick Fera, John Neufeld, Julian Spear

Bass Clarinet:
Gene Cipriano

Bassoon:
Don Christlieb, Jack Marsh, Ray Nowlin

French Horn:
Vincent N. DeRosa, Vincent N. DeRosa, David A. Duke, Robert E. Henderson, William A. Hinshaw, Richard E. Perissi, Gale H. Robinson, Harry Schmidt

Trumpet:
John Clyman, Robert Fowler, Paul T. Hubinon, Carroll "Cappy" Lewis, Malcolm Boyd McNab

Trombone:
Dick Hyde, Edward Kusby, Richard "Dick" Nash, Phillip A. Teele

Tuba:
John T. "Tommy" Johnson

Piano:
Ralph E. Grierson, Michael A. Lang, Michael R. Wofford

Keyboards:
Ralph E. Grierson

Guitar:
Larry E. Carlton, John E. Morell

Harp:
Lou Ann Neill, Anne Stockton (Mason)

Percussion:
Larry Bunker, Gary L. Coleman, Richard Cornell, John Cyr, Alan C. Estes, Victor Feldman, John P. Guerin, Milton Holland, Joe Porcaro, Harold L. "Hal" Rees, Kenneth E. Watson

Contractor:
Meyer (Mike) Rubin

Copyist:
Paul Sprosty

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.