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 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 12:32 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Speaking of books, does anyone have Planet of the Apes Collectibles: Unauthorized Guide With Trivia & Values by Christopher Sausville? I saw it briefly at my local comic shop back in the 1990s and would get it if I knew whether or not the photos are reproduced in color.

http://amzn.com/0764303325


It does and plenty of them, but the book is very dated now.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It does and plenty of them, but the book is very dated now.

I'm only interested in the 1960-'70s era; and the value guides mean nothing to me. smile I'd just like a one-volume reference of all the Apes stuff from the five films and TV show. Thanks for the tip!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 2:31 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

I shouldn't revisit this thread. It has made me want two quite expensive books now.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

It does and plenty of them, but the book is very dated now.

I'm only interested in the 1960-'70s era; and the value guides mean nothing to me. smile I'd just like a one-volume reference of all the Apes stuff from the five films and TV show. Thanks for the tip!


Until 1974, there really wasn't much APES "stuff"; a tie-in paperback of the Boulle book, a Project 3 soundtrack of Goldsmith's score, a Topps 44-card set for the original film, a Bell Records LP of the BENEATH score, a BENEATH novelization paperback, and that was about it unless you knew how to get original posters, lobby cards and stills.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's interesting that the big Apes marketing boom occurred largely after the films and TV series. I longed for those Mego action figures but parental decisions didn't allow for their purchase. wink I did have the aforementioned Power book and record sets, though. If the book contains the bulk of that post-Apes merchandising, then that's the book for me.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 1:24 PM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

This remains one of my all time favorite pop culture analysis books.



It really is fantastic.

http://amzn.to/1cNLQf1

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

And have you visited the Mego Museum...?

http://www.megomuseum.com/pota/

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2014 - 11:32 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Saw "Dawn...." the other week (in 3D) and revisited it last night....have to say, I think it's absolutely superb. Astonishing movie. Great script, direction that gives scenes room to breathe, effects that trump the marvels of it's predecessor and raise the bar significantly for mo-cap characters. Absolutely first rate. Only minor quibbles were the 3D, which for me is mostly a bit ineffective, and the score - not one of his best I don't think.

Bring on the "War..."....oh, and I do like how even though it can stand alone (even more so than "Rise...."), it will still sit in the timeline quite happily.

Anyone else got opinions?

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2014 - 2:33 AM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)

Saw "Dawn...." the other week (in 3D) and revisited it last night....have to say, I think it's absolutely superb. Astonishing movie. Great script, direction that gives scenes room to breathe, effects that trump the marvels of it's predecessor and raise the bar significantly for mo-cap characters. Absolutely first rate. Only minor quibbles were the 3D, which for me is mostly a bit ineffective, and the score - not one of his best I don't think.

Bring on the "War..."....oh, and I do like how even though it can stand alone (even more so than "Rise...."), it will still sit in the timeline quite happily.

Anyone else got opinions?


I saw it on opening night and being honest I was a little disappointed. Bits of it were very slow and the story was rather limited. The human characters were without exception very 2 dimensional.

It was an ok movie and but nowhere near as brilliant as Rise.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2014 - 12:38 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I was not so disappointed with DAWN (as current summer tent pole movies go, it was above average) as I was dissatisfied with it. My reaction at the conclusion was a simple, "That's it?" The story kind of lacked the proper scope (ironic in that this is the first APES film not shot in 'scope' Panavision) and did little to moving the concept toward the world of the '68 movie that the makers say they're aiming for. Basically what we're in the middle of is a story arc revolving around the first sentient ape, Caesar, and both dramatically and thematically it's little more than a simian soap opera that with DAWN still awaits yet a further installment before it reaches a supposed conclusion.

This is not what the concept started out as fifty years ago. Outside of the Boulle novel and the '68 film that further refined the novel's story, properly I contend, as a misanthrope's worst nightmare, all we've basically gotten since, as Charlton Heston stated in explaining his resistance to doing a sequel, is just "further adventures among the monkeys." Planet of the Apes is supposed to be a platform for social comment and political satire, but doing that well is hard. Easier is to just concentrate on clich├ęd adventure stories and trite character conflicts, but strip too much of the Planet of the Apes concept of allegorical heft and what you get is the 2001 Tim Burton directed "re-imaging," an artistically disastrous dive into silly camp.

At least the makers of these reboot/prequels have enough sense to play things straight, but given the talent pool behind them, I'm pretty certain that future installments won't come anywhere near to rivaling the original film's classic status and significance. Mark Bomback is no Michael Wilson, and Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver aren't Rod Serling much less Pierre Boulle, but good luck to them because the franchise can't afford too many lousy entries.

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2014 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)

If the film makers are bold, what would be awesome would be for the next film to climax with a doomsday device being detonated and with a few apes (possibly led by Caesar's son - because Caesar himself should die) leading a few apes off somewhere beforehand to safety.

And ideally there should be some humans there. And in the coda, Caesar's son should kill all the adults and cast out all the children into the fields and label the area where they live as forbidden.....

 
 Posted:   Aug 3, 2014 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Well, if you want to talk about where the next films could go, I too have ideas, the first of which is very much like yours, only I hold off the nuke stuff. The makers of the new films say these reboots are also prequels that lead to the world of the '68 original. So.....

I've limited the modern franchise to the same five-film number of the old franchise (though maybe only four would be better) and I've incorporated elements of the '70s sequels to embrace the entirety of the old series (though I personally may not be too crazy about it):


First movie -- RISE.

Second movie -- DAWN.

Third movie (I'm not going to propose titles), takes up directly where DAWN ends, the apes will battle what survives of the US military (a scientific advisor of which could be an alternate timeline, older Dr. Hasslein [from ESCAPE]). By the end of the film the apes lose the battle and Caesar, mortally wounded and fearing that his people will be exterminated, orders all apes to surrender. They do so after Caesar dies and are then enslaved by the humans who will use the apes for the hard labor that will be needed to rebuild civilization. (Yeah, this one's a big downer.)

Fourth movie -- we jump ahead three hundred years, mankind has only partially restored its former technological civilization. The long term affects of global warming, the wheels of which were set in motion long ago, have ravished the environment. What's left of humanity, as far as anyone knows, lives in a kind of semi-technological, Fascistic society in what was the United States, mostly in the east. Meanwhile the long term affects of the plague are still at work in the DNA of both man and apes. The apes are evolving at a rapid rate and are starting to reach the more humanoid creatures they were in the original '68 film. Humans on the other hand are devolving, becoming more mentally lazy while their slave apes do all the work, are brutally lorded over, but continue to breed and now equal or surpass the human population. Revolution is in the air and a descendant of Caesar, a chimpanzee named Aldo (again played by Andy Serkis) leads the apes in a revolt against their human masters. But the human leaders, paranoid as ever about what else might exist outside their confines, have secretly maintained ancient nuclear missiles and faced with the apes finally conquering and dominate them, detonate their bombs in an act of suicidal desperation. (This is more the remake of CONQUEST that RISE was supposed to be.)


Fifth and final film of the modern APES franchise -- we are a couple centuries past the nuclear holocaust the nearly killed all life. A small society of apes and humans survive in what was the Appalachian mountains of southwestern Virginia, the only inhabitable area left. Outside of this region most of the land is wasteland, and the area to the northeast still highly radioactive as most of the nukes were detonated there. The apes now appear very much like they did in the '68 original and have founded a society very much like ancient Rome (buildings made of stone, clothing like togas). A power struggle ensues among the apes over which species will rule the society. Humans, now mute and dumb animals and are kept by chimpanzees as pets. But one orangutan leader, Haristas (A name from the original Boulle novel. [see chapter 22]), is appalled by this and has kept secret a recorded oral history of the apes on a series of scrolls and has founded a simian religion based on suppression of that history and a fierce hated of mankind. In an alliance with a bigoted-against-all-chimps gorilla leader, Haristas and other orangutans and their now subordinate gorilla enforcers politically defeat the chimpanzee establishment that has ruled whatever society the apes have had since the time of Caesar. Now calling himself the Lawgiver, Haristas drives out into the wilderness what humans remain and declares Man an evil pestilence that must forever be shunned, and the desert area to the northeast the "Forbidden Zone." The ape civilization first seen in the 1968 original is thus founded. The film ends with the primitive humans making their way to the Atlantic coast. Seeing there the ruins of the Statue of Liberty, they flee in fear.


THE END..... until 20th Century Fox decides to reboot it all over again.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I saw the very ending of Rise on cable television a few weeks ago. I was surprised how awful the cgi was. Close up static shots (chest up) and faces were fantastic, but full body shots were cringe worthy. They moved in a completely unnatural way, it was very mechanical and while there are no matte lines in CGI the apes appeared to have an annoying dark fuzzy outline around their bodies. Was this improved upon for the sequel?

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   The Projectionist   (Member)

I just watched all the original Apes movies streaming for free on Amazon Prime Instant Video. And I was curious about Beneath the Planet of the Apes. What was the story behind the many of the action scenes, finale and end credits not being scored? It was really bizzarre, like watching behind the scenes rehearsals. I think Rosenman was scoring it.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I can still remember seeing the original at the Odeon cinema in the sixties, just great, & the end came as a surprise (well in those days you didn't know too much about a film before you went to see it...& I'm a bit slow on the uptake!). I didn't rate any of the sequels or Burtons film, but this latest lot is pretty good. I love Rise, I haven't seen Dawn, I'll probably buy the Blu-ray.

I liked the TV series, nothing fantastic, but quite enjoyable.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2014 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I just watched all the original Apes movies streaming for free on Amazon Prime Instant Video. And I was curious about Beneath the Planet of the Apes. What was the story behind the many of the action scenes, finale and end credits not being scored? It was really bizzarre, like watching behind the scenes rehearsals. I think Rosenman was scoring it.

BENEATH was a troubled production. It seems, from what I've read, that no one involved with the original really wanted to do it, and from the results it seems no one ever really got a handle on it. Ted Post, brought in after the first director attached left in disgust, couldn't exercise the kind of control he wanted and apparently didn't get along with line-producer Mort Abrahams. The script development alone shows that there was no overriding artistic vision that could be agreed upon (even efforts by Rod Serling and Pierre Boulle himself were rejected) and that the final film is a true "movie by committee." I suspect there was much post-production editing, and, after the score recorded, re-editing to try and save the picture. If you have the FSM CD of Rosenman's score you'll know that several cues were either dropped or re-edited.

 
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