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 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

I recently watched WELLS FARGO from Paramount in 1937. It probably was Victor Young's first western score. The main title and the rest of the score is quite memorable. That happens when you are walking in the street and you start humming the melody.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 9:16 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I recently watched WELLS FARGO from Paramount in 1937. It probably was Victor Young's first western score. The main title and the rest of the score is quite memorable. That happens when you are walking in the street and you start humming the melody.



Well after all Cody ....... it's Victor Young! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 9:37 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

It sure would be nice if the music elements still exist and a CD could be coming our way down the road. Right now,however, I'm thinking of Franz Waxman's score to THE FURIES. I hope the elements still exist and Chris Malone who has done such excellent restoration work for Kritzerland in the past, was able to do his "magic". We shall see. I could be way off base again.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

It sure would be nice if the music elements still exist and a CD could be coming our way down the road. Right now,however, I'm thinking of Franz Waxman's score to THE FURIES. I hope the elements still exist and Chris Malone who has done such excellent restoration work for Kritzerland in the past, was able to do his "magic". We shall see. I could be way off base again.



Wells Fargo Victor Young was 1937! I doubt the elements still exist.

Even 1950s Paramount I think it's a roll of the dice as to what's still there and in what condition.

That said, I'll take ANY 30s, 40s & 50s Paramount! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

.....Hugo Friedhofer's scores for NO MAN OF HER OWN

THUNDER IN THE EAST

ACE IN THE HOLE


This is what I'd like to witness, too!

A Hugo Friedhofer @ Paramount disc......



Plus the Friedhofer score for the otherwise unmentioned Alan Ladd, Dorothy Lamour, Robert Preston 1947 film, WILD HARVEST, directed by Tay Garnett. I've heard that the score is quite good (I suppose considering that it's just one year away from THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES) though I've never seen the film.

It might also be interesting to hear Hugo's underscore for the Bing Crosby-Jane Wyman-Ethel Barrymore film, JUST FOR YOU. (The songs, of course, would likely be tied up because of the Crosby-Decca contract, but the score itself might be releasable.)

Has anyone (yet) ever officially released the complete soundtrack underscore alone for any Golden Age musical??? Seems like a new avenue for Soundtrack CD score releases.


Well, you know the answer to that question - we just did.




Of course you did. As did most of George Feltenstein's MGM Rhino discs, etc.

Obviously I didn't ask the question correctly, though I thought saying "alone" would suffice.
And I certainly didn't want to reference CENTENNIAL SUMMER which, from the sound clips, appears to be breathtaking.

What I'm suggesting is that where the soundtrack songs are A PROBLEM (Sinatra, Crosby, etc)
because the artists are tied to contracts with other companies, would it be possible to release, for example, the underscore (MINUS the vocal sections with their orchestral beds) for JUST FOR YOU, HERE COMES THE GROOM, ANYTHING GOES (1956), WITH A SONG IN MY HEART, THE STUDENT PRINCE, etc. etc......? Good TCF examples reflecting this problem (and possible solution) would be SAY ONE FOR ME, APRIL LOVE, CALL ME MADAM, etc.

In other words, the score runs through the main title to the first song---the song vocal and orchestral background for the song is dropped---the score cues continue to the next song---the next song vocal and orchestral background are dropped---and the score cues continue in this way to the end of the film. Thus the whole CD release for the given musical is orchestral only---but the actual vocal songs and their individual underscore is missing.

This would be a sad reflection on each score as a musical entity, but at least it would get the score---in excellent quality---out there and those of us who might want to hear the score alone could do so but those of us who are enterprising could also reassemble a pretty good musical CD for ourselves without dialog overlays and picking up the vocalized songs from a video.

As time goes on this seems the only way we're going to get even a piece of the vast majority of the musicals we'd like.

The CENTENNIAL SUMMER thread saddens me greatly because it's obvious that a number of people---even some who I'm really surprised about---are buying the CD only for Alfred Newman's scoring---not the vocalized songs. (It's also somewhat weird because quite a lot of the underscore is based ON the Kern songs---a procedure Newman often followed in doing his orchestral underscore sequences for musicals---extrapolating the song melodies and interpolating them into his own scoring. He was a master at this. One example which is really exceptional in this is his work on THAT LADY IN ERMINE, a so-so film but one which is enveloped by Newman's gorgeous underscore.)

Oh, well. A voice crying in the wilderness, I know....... smile

But....thanks for CENTENNIAL SUMMER!.....and now we return to COMPOSERS AT PARAMOUNT.




"The Centennial Summer thread saddens me greatly ........."

I know what you're saying Manderley. The Newman score is mainly why I'm buying it. I do indeed appreciate the great songs from many years ago. But my heart is in the great golden age scores from 1930 to maybe late 1960s.

You know, I have a friend, Richard, I've known since 1971. Richard LOVES light and lovely songs, Broadway shows, Hollywood musicals etc. But, he's cool on serious film scores. He's a life long fan of John Barry, but mostly Barry's beautiful themes. Richard like "light" orchestral scores only, no Waxman, Rozsa, Steiner, Friedhofer and especially no Herrmann. Richard has a totally opposite approach than I do. To each his own.

Also, most of us have to watch our spending. So, we have to zero in on what we really want the very most.

I do go to Youtube and watch and listen to songs, especially Katherine Jenkins! smile

I think golden age fans especially have a narrow range of interest in both films and their scores.
I know I do. It doesn't take much to lose me.

Well, that's my thoughts! smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Those are all excellent suggestions, ToneRow. The Leith Stevens is particularly exciting...

Yavar


Thanks, Yavar!

I would have thought you would be asking for Roy Webb @ Paramount.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:40 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Fuhgeddaboud The Beatles' invasion of America.

During the late 1960s, the Brits came to score for Paramount. smile

  • John Dankworth's THE LAST SAFARI (1967)
  • NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY (1968) by Stanley Myers (the original sessions as well as the DOT LP album)
  • Norman Kay's DIAMONDS FOR BREAKFAST (1968)
  • Ron Grainer's THE ASSASSINATION BUREAU (1969) [yeah we know Grainer was Aussie, but his TV & film music career was from Britain]
  • MY SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN (1969) by Wilfred Josephs (original sessions plus LP program)

  •  
     Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:52 PM   
     By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

    Thanks ToneRow -- I indeed would buy any Roy Webb scores released (as long as they are substantially original instead of interpolating popular songs)!

    Yavar

     
     
     Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 11:39 PM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    Fuhgeddaboud The Beatles' invasion of America.

    During the late 1960s, the Brits came to score for Paramount. smile


    Also, John Scott's THE LONG DUEL (1967), issued on an Atco LP.
    And:
    Malcolm Arnold's AFRICA--TEXAS STYLE! (1967)
    John Hawksworth's THE PENTHOUSE (1967)
    Wilfred Josephs' THE DEADLY BEES (1967)
    John Addison's SMASHING TIME (1967), issued on an ABC LP
    Eric Spear's THE VULTURE (1967)
    Dudley Moore's INADMISSABLE EVIDENCE (1968)
    Basil Kirchin's THE STRANGE AFFAIR (1968)
    Malcolm Lockyer's THE LONG DAY'S DYING (1968)
    Kenneth V. Jones' MAROC 7 (1968)
    Marc Wilkinson's IF... (1968) [Wilkinson was born in France, studied music in the U.S., and mostly scored British films]
    Ron Grainer's ONLY WHEN I LARF (1968)
    Ron Goodwin's THOSE DARING YOUNG MEN IN THEIR JAUNTY JALOPIES (1969)
    Alfred Ralston's OH! WHAT A LOVELY WAR (1969)

     
     
     Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 9:19 AM   
     By:   PFK   (Member)

    Fuhgeddaboud The Beatles' invasion of America.

    During the late 1960s, the Brits came to score for Paramount. smile


    Also, John Scott's THE LONG DUEL (1967), issued on an Atco LP.
    And:
    Malcolm Arnold's AFRICA--TEXAS STYLE! (1967)
    John Hawksworth's THE PENTHOUSE (1967)
    Wilfred Josephs' THE DEADLY BEES (1967)
    John Addison's SMASHING TIME (1967), issued on an ABC LP
    Eric Spear's THE VULTURE (1967)
    Dudley Moore's INADMISSABLE EVIDENCE (1968)
    Basil Kirchin's THE STRANGE AFFAIR (1968)
    Malcolm Lockyer's THE LONG DAY'S DYING (1968)
    Kenneth V. Jones' MAROC 7 (1968)
    Marc Wilkinson's IF... (1968) [Wilkinson was born in France, studied music in the U.S., and mostly scored British films]
    Ron Grainer's ONLY WHEN I LARF (1968)
    Ron Goodwin's THOSE DARING YOUNG MEN IN THEIR JAUNTY JALOPIES (1969)
    Alfred Ralston's OH! WHAT A LOVELY WAR (1969)




    I went to the movies a lot in the 60s and did indeed notice all the films with British composers. Some of these films were made in the U.K., some were USA films. Didn't realize quite a few were from Paramount.

     
     
     Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 12:02 PM   
     By:   cody1949   (Member)

    Another composer that comes to mind is Paul Sawtell. He composed many Tim Holt B westerns at RKO in the '40's. In the '50's he moved over to Paramount and composed the score to many westerns. The films were basically second features , but a step up from the 60 minute oaters.
    THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID
    SILVER CITY
    WARPATH
    FLAMING FEATHER
    DENVER & RIO GRANDE
    THE SAVAGE
    PONY EXPRESS
    ARROWHEAD
    I really can't comment on their merit. I haven't seen them in ages and they aren't in my collection. Just thought I would mention his name as he seems to have been kept quite busy in his career.

     
     Posted:   Jul 30, 2014 - 3:17 PM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)


    Well ToneRow, I don't know about PEKING EXPRESS, but, according to a recent La-La Land posting, WILD IS THE WIND is coming out as a 2-disc set from La-La Land in August!


    Thanks for the update.

    I haven't been keeping up with announcements on upcoming releases.

    To be honest, La-La Land is not the first label I think of regarding Golden Age.

    La-La Land has been championing Tiomkin, though!

     
     Posted:   Jul 30, 2014 - 3:40 PM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)

    Thanks to Bob DiMucci, we can see that there's enough material to have the making of a 12-disc box set of Paramount soundtracks by British composers. smile

    Which label could we rely on to deliver this dream album to us?

    The title of this box set could be "The Redcoats are coming ... the Redcoats are coming ... to Paramount"

     
     Posted:   Oct 28, 2014 - 5:03 AM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)


    Hugo Friedhofer's scores for NO MAN OF HER OWN

    THUNDER IN THE EAST

    ACE IN THE HOLE


    This is what I'd like to witness, too!

    A Hugo Friedhofer @ Paramount disc.

    Guys such as John Davis (tape transfers) and James Nelson (digital remastering for albums) would know if this is happening because they're the ones who work on projects like these.

    Perhaps even Mike Matessino is/was involved during recording elements' restoration processing.



    *update*: Intrada released 2 of these titles!

    2 outta 3 ain't bad...

     
     
     Posted:   Oct 28, 2014 - 11:28 AM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    Thanks to Bob DiMucci, we can see that there's enough material to have the making of a 12-disc box set of Paramount soundtracks by British composers. smile


    Sadly, all of those titles are from the "lost decade" of Paramount scores. Unless tracks could be found in Britain, it is unlikely that we'll see any of them.

     
     
     Posted:   Oct 28, 2014 - 11:32 AM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    Another composer that comes to mind is Paul Sawtell. He composed many Tim Holt B westerns at RKO in the '40's. In the '50's he moved over to Paramount and composed the score to many westerns. The films were basically second features , but a step up from the 60 minute oaters.
    THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID
    SILVER CITY
    WARPATH
    FLAMING FEATHER
    DENVER & RIO GRANDE
    THE SAVAGE
    PONY EXPRESS
    ARROWHEAD
    I really can't comment on their merit. I haven't seen them in ages and they aren't in my collection. Just thought I would mention his name as he seems to have been kept quite busy in his career.


    Here are the major Paramount westerns in the 1950 – 1959 period:

    The Eagle and the Hawk (1950) - Rudy Schrager
    The Furies (1950) – Franz Waxman
    The Great Missouri Raid (1950) – Paul Sawtell
    Copper Canyon (1950) - Daniele Amfitheatrof
    The Redhead and the Cowboy (1951) – David Buttolph
    Branded (1951) – Roy Webb
    Silver City (1951) – Paul Sawtell
    The Last Outpost (1951) - Lucien Cailliet
    Red Mountain (1951) – Franz Waxman
    Passage West (1951) - Mahlon Merrick
    Warpath (1951) – Paul Sawtell
    The Blazing Forest (1952) - Lucien Cailliet
    The Flaming Feather (1952) – Paul Sawtell
    Denver & Rio Grande (1952) – Paul Sawtell
    The Savage (1952) – Paul Sawtell
    Arrowhead (1953) – Paul Sawtell
    Shane (1953) – Victor Young {Released by La-La Land, August 2012}
    Pony Express (1953) – Paul Sawtell
    The Far Horizons (1955) – Hans Salter {Released by Kritzerland, July 2013}
    Run for Cover (1955) – Howard Jackson
    Three Violent People (1956) – Walter Scharf
    The Lonely Man (1957) – Van Cleave {Released by Kritzerland, February 2013}
    Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) – Dimitri Tiomkin (16 min. re-recording included in FSM’s Elmer Bernstein Filmmusic Collection) {Released by La-La Land, December 2013}
    The Tin Star (1957) – Elmer Bernstein {Released by Kritzerland, March 2011}
    Last Train from Gun Hill (1959) – Dimitri Tiomkin {Released by Counterpoint, June 2011}
    The Jayhawkers! (1959) – Jerome Moross (17 min. re-recording on Silva Screen CD) {Released by Intrada, September 2012}
    The Hangman (1959) – Harry Sukman
    Thunder In the Sun (1959) – [no composer credited, Cyril Mockridge is music director]

     
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