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 Posted:   Feb 6, 2008 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

neo - I remain a huge fan of Sal Buscema for his work on Spectacular Spider-Man in the 1990s. The material he drew for The Child Within series is breathtaking at times.

I loved Sal's great run on The Defenders, you just don't get a much odder teaming than The Hulk, Submariner and Doc Strangecool

I rarely read comics anymore except the odd graphic novel here and there.

The last time I was into a comic series was THE INCREDIBLE HULK during Peter David's amazing long run as writer of the title and featuring some fantastic artwork by the likes of Dale McKeown (sic), Gary Frank ( a fine artist who reminded me of a cross between the styles of John Buscema and John Byrne ) and Andy Kubbert ( son of Joe ). Peter David did wonders with this title, taking the Hulk a long way from the days of "Hulk Smash" and playing brilliantly with the varied "scitzophrenic" personalities, my favourite of which was a period when the Hulk became 'Mr. Fixit', an enforcer in Las Vegas during a time when the rest of the world thinks the Hulk is dead.

Man, I'm getting all nostalgicsmile

The late Guy Mariner Tucker ( aka H.Rocco ) would've loved this thread. frown

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2008 - 12:07 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)


Peter David is currently writing the She Hulk comic for Marvel.

His Hulk run was terrific... Great writer. Able to write really poignant stuff and be absolutely hysterical at the same time.

His Star Trek novels, in particular, Q-In-Law, is some of the funniest stuff I've ever read.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2008 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Now you could almost call it Stan and Jack’s version of their D(istinguished) C(ompetition)’s Sgt. Rock but



was its own colorful original. Rock’s Easy Company adventures were far more-reality oriented (and almost had a dispassionately documentary aura of detachment) while Nicholas Fury and his kavortin’ comrades were long on emotion and short on restraint.

Still, when The King returned periodically, everything escalated to the utmost degree. And to prove Marvel’s brand of character identification (and subsequent involvement) wasn’t relegated only to their superheroes, no issue moved us more than



The final silently tragic, eloquently anguished sequences are among the most sheerly emotionally SHATTERING Kirby and Lee – admirably aided and abetted by inker Chic Stone – ever to emerge from the House of Ideas.

While its rip-roaring follow-up



has Darlin’ Dick Ayers taking over the drawing reins as, during Fury’s unforgettable final showdown with Baron Von Krumpt, highlights some of Stan’s most passionate monologues about Good and Evil, Redemption and Absolution he usually saved for his Silver Surfer metaphors.

Whatever these two touched in those days of yore (and ours)



always seemed to turn into pure creative gold



smile

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2008 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Rock’s Easy Company adventures were far more-reality oriented (and almost had a dispassionately documentary aura of detachment) while Nicholas Fury and his kavortin’ comrades were long on emotion and short on restraint.


Fury's boys had "adventures" while Rock's men went through Hell...No artist conveyed this better than Joe Kubert.

Don't get me wrong. it's all great stuff, and mid-century pop culture had an embarassment of riches: film, music, TV; and yes, comics!

 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2008 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

"Get the lead out, ya yellow brickers!!!"

wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 9, 2008 - 11:18 AM   
 By:   Bob Oblong   (Member)

If you're a fan of Sgt. Rock, you should check out the two recent trade paperbacks "Between Hell and a Hard Place" and "The Prophecy". Really, really good stuff, and after all these years, Joe Kubert is STILL at the top of his game.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

OK, so any opinions on the greatest Marvel sequence/title/story?

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

There's two from the 60's that I thought were really cool...

There's an issue of Daredevil, #51, I think, where Barry Windsor Smith was the artist... Black Panther was the guest star and, as I recall, there was a page or two of him sneaking around with absolutely no captions whatsoever. BWS was paying some kind of homage to Steranko here and it looks a little crude considering what he evolved into a few years later but I think this is one of the earliest sequences in comics to feature absolute silence.

There's an issue of S.H.I.E.L.D., the title and issue # elude me, so forgive me... This story has been reproduced more than once... but it was during Jim Steranko's run in the 60's... Basically, it's James Bond meets the Hound Of The Baskervilles and almost the entire issue is full of eye popping and innovative story telling techniques that people are still ripping off in film, television and comics.

Crap, here's another one... Steranko does a 3 issue run on Captain America in the 60's... Cap and Bucky are running through the sewers and step into an awesome 2 page spread where they run into a room full of Hydra agents. They are totally outnumbered but they're right in the thick of it, whooping ass.

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 8:45 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

Here's another one...

Conan The Barbarian... #37, I think... Remember all those cool Conan The Barbarian and Tarzan The Ape Man paperback covers Neal Adams did? Here's a whole issue of Conan drawn by Neal Adams and I'm pretty sure it was inked by Tom Palmer. The plot is inconsequential but, needless to say, Conan kicks ass and looks great doing it.

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 9:16 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

OK, so any opinions on the greatest Marvel sequence/title/story?

The entire battle against the Overmind, starting in Fantastic Four #111, contains the single greatest ending in comic history, as its an ironic twist that even Rod Serling would cherish.

The Overmind defeats the Fantastic Four in a brutal battle, declairing how he will one day control all of existence! The Watcher shows up later, defeats him single-handedly and then exiles him to a new existence inside a single mote of dust!

My other suggestion would be The Child Within storyline from Spectacular Spider-Man from the 1990s. Dark, dark stuff about revenge, sexual abuse and the power parents have over their children. The first page of the third issue is one of the most powerful I've ever seen - a photo album of the Osborne household and how the pictures become sadder and more violent. The last picture is simply ripped out of the book.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Here's another one...

Conan The Barbarian... #37, I think... Remember all those cool Conan The Barbarian and Tarzan The Ape Man paperback covers Neal Adams did? Here's a whole issue of Conan drawn by Neal Adams and I'm pretty sure it was inked by Tom Palmer. The plot is inconsequential but, needless to say, Conan kicks ass and looks great doing it.


Are you sure that wasn't an issue of the black & white format Savage Sword Of Conan Mike? I don't remember Adams working on the regular title though I'll admit my memory is a bit hazy going that far back. Adams worked irregularly on SSoC.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 9:49 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Loads of wonderful Conan covers here


http://www.coverbrowser.com/covers/conan-the-barbarian

cool

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 9:53 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Here's another one...

Conan The Barbarian... #37, I think... Remember all those cool Conan The Barbarian and Tarzan The Ape Man paperback covers Neal Adams did? Here's a whole issue of Conan drawn by Neal Adams and I'm pretty sure it was inked by Tom Palmer. The plot is inconsequential but, needless to say, Conan kicks ass and looks great doing it.


Are you sure that wasn't an issue of the black & white format Savage Sword Of Conan Mike? I don't remember Adams working on the regular title though I'll admit my memory is a bit hazy going that far back. Adams worked irregularly on SSoC.


Mike is right on this one, I think even the issue number, it was the regular Conan color comic. It was a kick-ass bit of art from Adams, I loved that one.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Odlicno   (Member)

Some Russ Heath art:



Holy Wow - i remember this - i had it in a SGT ROCK special from 1989 or 1990 - it was ace.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Mike, I looked it up on google and you're absolutely right, Adams did issue 37 of CTB.smile

Looking through the covers in my previous post was a very nostalgic trip for me, the very first issue of Conan I bought was # 31, I knew of the titles existence wayyyyy before that due to adds in other Marvel comics but back in the early 1970's it was notoriously difficult to find American imports on U.K. news stands meaning that if, for example I found a copy of The Fantastic Four that ended in a cliff hanger it was etremely unlikely I'd find the next issue the following Month, life could be a real bummer back then.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Loads of wonderful Conan covers here


http://www.coverbrowser.com/covers/conan-the-barbarian

cool



Yep, that issue # 37 is so obviously Neal Adamssmile

I'd forgotten about the Elric / Conan crossover which was written by Roy Thomas and Michael Moorcock. cool

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

There's an equally gorgeous Red Sonja story that came out around the same time as this Conan story... Pencilled by Esteban Maroto and inked by Dick Giordano. It might have started out as a B&W story in Savage Sword or Savage Tales but it eventually got colored and it is just beautiful... Again, the story was nothing to get excited about but seeing Maroto draw Red Sonja...

Kapow!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

Marvel’s All-Tyme Greatest Highs:

1. Stan and Jack’s magnificent Galactus Trilogy.



2. Stan and Jack’s The Inhumans Saga.



3. Frank Miller’s seminal serial of the tragic Elektra.



4. And Miller’s gloriously transcendent resurrection



of her.



5. Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s unforgettable Phoenix Saga.



6. Stan and Steve’s memorable farewell episodes (for Ditko),





culminating in one of the truly classic and inspirational sequences in Marvel history.



and the list will go on, Frantic Ones.



Till then, face front! wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 11:16 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

For me the Phoenix arc was the last hurrah of comics for me. I found it slightly anticlimactic, but powerful.

There was also a Skrull-Kree war in the Avengers, I believe, which included some amazing art---Steranko, I believe? I seem to recall an ish of Avengers in which Ant Man went inside The Vision, and at the same time a Skrull ship took off. Just thinking on the page here, but maybe some of the faithful will recall.

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2008 - 11:41 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

Neal Adams and Tom Palmer on the Kree-Skrull War, with maybe a fill-in issue or two with John Buscema and Tom Palmer.

Great artwork on the Kree-Skrull War...

and if you're going to mention this, we should also bring up the Roy Thomas/Neal Adams/Tom Palmer on the X-Men from around the same time.

X-Men #56 to... 63?

 
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