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The latest release from Intrada is an expanded version of James Horner's lively score for the 1989 Disney hit HONEY, I SHRUNK THE KIDS, featuring Horner's sequencing from the previous Intrada releases plus three additional cues.


La-La Land has announced their current schedule of releases for May, with two releases set for next week: the soundtrack to one of Alfred Hitchcock's final films, TORN CURTAIN, the romantic spy thriller pairing Paul Newman and Julie Andrews, featuring the cues Bernard Herrmann (in his final collaboration with the director) recorded for the film before his score was rejected, and an expanded version of the replacement score by Oscar winner John Addison (Tom Jones, The Seven-per-cent Solution); and a fifth volume of their series STAR TREK: THE ORIGINAL SERIES - THE 1701 COLLECTION, this edition featuring episode scores by five-time Oscar nominee George Duning (From Here to Eternity, Picnic).


The latest releases from Buysoundtrax and its related labels are a two-disc set of Morton Stevens' score for the 1979 TV minseries BACKSTAIRS AT THE WHITE HOUSE; GERALD FRIED: THE WESTERNS VOL. 1, featuring the composer's music for the small (Story of a Rodeo Cowboy, Wagon Train) and big (Terror in a Texas Town) screens; THE JIM DOOLEY COLLECTION VOL. 1, including the composer's demo music for his unused score to TV's Cosmos; and FRANZ WAXMAN: LEGENDARY HOLLYWOOD VOL. 1, a rerelease of re-recordings of classic film music by the two-time Oscar winner.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Doom: The Deluxe Edition - Clint Mansell - Varese Sarabande CD Club
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids
- James Horner - Intrada
The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power [10-disc set] - Bear McCreary - Mondo 
What Lies Beneath - Alan Silvestri - Varese Sarabande CD Club 


IN THEATERS TODAY

Dragonkeeper - Arturo Cardelus 
Evil Does Not Exist - Eiko Ishibashi
The Fall Guy - Dominic Lewis
I Saw the TV Glow - Alex G
Jeanne du Barry - Stephen Warbeck
Mars Express - Fred Avril, Philippe Monthaye
Sweet Dreams - Martial Foe
Tarot - Joseph Bishara
Who Is Stan Smith? - Cyrus Melchor 
Wildcat - Latham Gaines, Shelby Gaines


COMING SOON

May 10
Star Trek: The Original Series - The 1701 Collection Vol. 5 - George Duning - La-La Land
Torn Curtain - John Addison, Bernard Herrmann - La-La Land 
May 17
One Day - Anne Nikitin, Jessica Jones, Tim Morrish - Silva
Coming Soon 
Arsene Lupin
 - Debbie Wiseman - Music Box
Backstairs at the White House
- Morton Stevens - Dragon's Domain
Bruno Nicolai for Jess Franco
 - Bruno Nicolai - Digitmovies
Chissa' perche'...Capitano tutte a me
 - Guido & Maurizio De Angelis - Beat 
The David Michael Frank Collection Vol. 3
 - David Michael Frank - Dragon's Domain
Franz Waxman: Legendary Hollywood Vol. 1
- Franz Waxman - Citadel
Gerald Fried: The Westerns Vol. 1
- Gerald Fried - Dragon's Domain
Goliath Awaits
 - George Duning - Dragon's Domain [CD-R]
Ironmaster La Guerra Del Ferro
 - Guido & Maurizio De Angelis - Beat
The Jim Dooley Collection Vol. 1
- Jim Dooley - Dragon's Domain [CD-R]
Le tableau vole
 - Alexei Aigui - Music Box
The Morton Stevens Collection Vol. 2
 - Morton Stevens - Dragon's Domain
No Retreat, No Surrender
 - Paul Gilreath - Dragon's Domain [CD-R] 
The Planets (Herrmann recording)
 - Gustav Holst - Quartet
The Primevals
 - Richard Band - Silva 
Samaritan: The Mitch Snyder Story
 - Craig Safan - Dragon's Domain [CD-R] 
Squadra Antifurto
 - Guido & Maurizio De Angelis - Beat 
Uncommon Valor 
- James Horner - Quartet

THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

May 3 - Hugo Friedhofer born (1901)
May 3 - James Brown born (1933)
May 3 - Stephen Warbeck born (1953)
May 3 - Les Baxter records his score for House of Usher (1960)
May 3 - David Raksin begins recording his score for Two Weeks in Another Town (1962)
May 3 - Elmer Bernstein begins recording his score for Cahill United States Marshal (1973)
May 3 - Bruce Broughton begins recording his score for Baby’s Day Out (1994)
May 3 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Extreme Measures” (1999)
May 3 - Alden Shuman died (2002)
May 3 - Recording sessions begin for David Arnold’s score for The Stepford Wives (2004)
May 3 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Countdown” (2004)
May 3 - Recording sessions begin for Michael Giacchino’s score for Sky High (2005)
May 4 - Beatrice Thiriet born (1960)
May 4 - John Barry begins recording his score for Body Heat (1981)
May 4 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for The Secret of NIMH (1982)
May 4 - James Horner begins recording his score for Batteries Not Included (1987)
May 4 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Sarek” (1990)
May 4 - Michael Kamen begins recording his score for Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)
May 4 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “I, Borg.” (1992)
May 4 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Crossover” (1994)
May 4 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Family Business” (1995)
May 4 - Albert Glasser died (1998)
May 5 - Gene Forrell born (1915)
May 5 - Patrick Gowers born (1936)
May 5 - Delia Derbyshire born (1937)
May 5 - Andre Previn begins recording his score for House of Numbers (1957)
May 5 - Jerome Moross begins recording his score for The Jayhawkers (1959)
May 5 - David Shire begins recording his score for The Big Bus (1976)
May 5 - Recording sessions begin for Pino Donaggio’s score for Dressed to Kill (1980)
May 5 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Congo (1995)
May 5 - Recording sessions begin for Christopher Young's score for Species (1995)
May 5 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Blaze of Glory” (1997)
May 5 - Isao Tomita died (2016)
May 6 - Recording sessions begin for Bronislau Kaper's score to The Glass Slipper (1954)
May 6 - Recording begins on Alfred Newman and Hugo Friedhofer's score to The Bravados in Munich, Germany (1958)
May 6 - Tom Chase born (1965) 
May 6 - Elmer Bernstein begins recording his score for The Sons of Katie Elder (1965)
May 6 - Michel Legrand begins recording his score to Ice Station Zebra (1968)
May 6 - Morton Stevens begins recording his score for Parts 3 & 4 of Masada (1980)
May 6 - Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Neutral Zone" (1988)
May 6 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Hope and Fear” (1998)
May 6 - Leonard Salzedo died (2000)
May 6 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “The Haunting of Deck Twelve” (2000)
May 6 - William Olvis died (2014)
May 6 - Antony Hopkins died (2014)
May 7 - George Stoll born (1902)
May 7 - Anne Dudley born (1956)
May 7 - Leith Stevens records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “Framed” (1968)
May 7 - Elliot Kaplan died (1992) 
May 7 - Soren Hyldgaard died (2018)
May 8 - Nathan Van Cleave born (1910)
May 8 - Larry Morey died (1971)
May 8 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for Escape from Alcatraz (1979)
May 8 - Basil Poledouris begins recording his score for Return to the Blue Lagoon (1991)
May 8 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Jetrel” (1995)
May 8 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Renaissance Man” (2001)
May 9 - Richard Shores born (1917)
May 9 - Eddy Manson born (1919) 

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

ARCADIAN - Kristen Gundred, Josh Martin

"Brewer’s direction infuses every frame with a sense of foreboding, capturing the desolate beauty of the post-apocalyptic landscape with haunting precision. Enhanced by a haunting score and atmospheric cinematography, 'Arcadian' immerses viewers in a world teetering on the brink of collapse, where every shadow conceals a potential threat. Yes, if you’ve seen 'A Quiet Place,' 'Bird Box,' or '28 Days Later,' you know exactly what to expect, but the film manages to inject unique personality through its talented young actors and some truly remarkable monster movie magic that broadly looks practical and not unlike the puppetry work of Jim Henson. Like its quality predecessors, 'Arcadian' is more than a mere horror film; it’s a haunting meditation on the fragility of humanity and the enduring power of hope in the face of despair. It turns out that mixing heart with horror still works."
 
Mike DeAngelo, The Playlist 
 
"Directed by Cage’s 'The Trust' filmmaker Ben Brewer, 'Arcadian' splits the difference between contemporary horror movies and ’80s Spielberg blockbusters, relying on clever jump scares and sentimental music cues in equal measure. An elegant little film about the things in life that are worth taking risks for, 'Arcadian' is a reminder of how much Cage has to offer us when he’s not contorting himself into something indescribable."
 
Christian Zilko, IndieWire 

CHALLENGERS - Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross
 
"In the third act, the haphazard jutting finally begins to add texture to the story, but by then, I had spent too long wondering why writer Justin Kuritzkes and editor Marco Costa had hobbled the film’s structure in a too-obvious homage to the serve and return. (Credit to the flinty, sharp score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, though, which lends the film a tense propulsion that the storytelling itself desperately lacks.)"
 
Angelica Jade Bastien, New York
 
"Even the score from the Oscar-winning duo of Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross is a disappointment, seemingly and inexplicably pilfering Pink Floyd’s 'On the Run.' It’s honked at the audience at alarming volume, sometimes obliterating the dialogue. If only the sound team had pushed heavier on the faders, because there were scenes when I wished that the mix would shove the eye-rolling script completely off court. And, let’s face facts, nothing here is going to beat hearing David Bowie’s 'Time Will Crawl' on a theatre-level sound system. So, there’s that going in Challengers’ favor. Aside from that, it’s just double fault after double fault."
 
Richard Whittaker, The Austin Chronicle 
 
"The actors dash around the tennis court, but it is kind of shocking that Guadagnino uses some stale sports-movie tropes, including a slo-mo walk down a corridor to the court outside, and spectators at a match turning their heads right then left then right again in unison. The tropes may be used knowingly but they still look clichéd. And there is a thunderous Thwack! whenever anyone hits a tennis ball. One of the best surprises turns out to be the soundtrack by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, a propulsive techno score that does a lot of the work to keep the tennis scenes moving."
 
Caryn James, BBC.com  

"The problems lie more so with the filmmaking itself. The heavy use of slow motion is a big offender, as is a specific musical cue that plays every. single. time. two out of the three characters start to verbally spar with each other. (You know, like a tennis match!) The cue completely drowns out the dialogue in some scenes and plays more like a drop you’d hear in a soap opera. The third act also becomes heavily reliant on POV shots of Patrick and Art hitting the ball, with a GoPro going back and forth in a way that’s going to induce many a headache."
 
Kristen Lopez, The Wrap 
 
"Such euphoric filmmaking is enhanced by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ intoxicating, synth-heavy score, which asserts itself as an indispensable part of the film. In 'Challengers,' the music acts as punctuation, both periods and ellipses. Parts of it will kick in mid-sentence, as if someone accidentally opened Spotify while talking. Other times, the score will begin over a protracted conversation, amplifying the pressure during a heated tête-à-tête. It’s atypical for such a high-energy score to find its place in these otherwise quiet moments, but the music is a way for Guadagnino to augment this idea that everything -- each word of dialogue and choice made by a character -- is about tennis, and shares all of the same stakes. Everything is, therefore, also about sex, which is precisely what listening to Reznor and Ross’ agile set of electronic hedonism feels like."

Coleman Spilde, The Daily Beast 

"Languid piano scales capture the hypnotic effect Tashi has on both men. More often, though, 'Challengers' punctuates scenes with an aggressive electronic score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, which is fantastic but only intermittently seems to have anything to do with what’s onscreen. The heavy beats work best as a metronome for the tennis fans in the stands whipping their heads between volleys, although for a while, I was half-convinced that they were also the hold music filling Art’s head whenever his wife wasn’t lecturing him about his game. Really, though, I think Guadagnino is just having fun, especially when the feeling of that heaving pulse becomes even more important than the dialogue. Some conversations don’t even try to be heard over the racket. Instead, they take on that crunchy, echo-y sound of movie quotes swallowed up into club music, like how that George Michael track 'Too Funky' spliced in a sample of 'The Graduate's' Anne Bancroft purring, 'Would you like me to seduce you?'"
 
Amy Nicholson, Los Angeles Times 
 
"There’s a whole lot of tennis in this movie, but the director and DP make sure it’s always engaging to watch. And the breathless, driving techno score, from soundtrack stalwarts Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, gives each new match a heart-in-the-throat feeling of escalation and intensity."

Tasha Robinson, Polygon 

"The glaringly computer-generated tennis balls only serve to enhance the feeling that a racket is sometimes more than just a racket, while Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ pounding techno score is almost exclusively used to fill the silences between points, which is similar to how it’s used in the dialogue scenes throughout the film."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire
 
"This is how 'Challengers' remains so erotic in spite of, and also because of, its paltry offering of sexually explicit sequences. It’s all buoyed by longing and unrealized desire, a patient camera fixated on bodies and the sweat that drips off them, and a pulsing techno score from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross that notably turns quiet, intimate scenes into feeding frenzies -- amplifying a build of tension that is often freed so unsatisfactorily (in a good way), always edging just short of climax."
 
Brianna Zigler, Paste Magazine 
 
"For the tennis matches, Guadagnino has a few tricks up his sleeve. First is Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ loud, thumping music. Then, the slowing down of many scenes to an almost standstill to show every nuance of movement on the actors’ faces while ignoring the uninteresting small yellow balls. These methods succeed only intermittently. The music becomes oppressive and intrusive in many instances and the freeze frames become too much to handle when they appear even in the non-tennis scenes. Both elements, however, make the final match that frames the whole movie exciting and carry the audience over to a satisfactory climax."
 
Murtada Elfadl, The Onion AV Club 

"Seldom these days is a movie just about adults in adult circumstances. Guadagnino, the Italian director who became more well-known to American audiences with his 2017 hit 'Call Me by Your Name,' has always specialized in the intimate connection between people. Combining his eye for expressive filmmaking, a mature performance from the three main stars and a droning pop score from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, 'Challengers' is a seductive feast for the senses."
 
Amanda Luberto, Arizona Republic 

"What a situation! The instability of it keeps 'Challengers' on its toes even when it’s on the verge of getting tripped up by plot machinations and the past/present storytelling churn of Justin Kuritzkes’ screenplay and Marco Costa’s editing. There’s a lively cinematic subgenre that deconstructs the rise and fall of a relationship by jumping around in time -- two excellent examples are 'Blue Valentine' and 'Two for the Road' -- and this movie carries on that tradition with panache, and adds many spectacularly blocked, framed, and edited scenes of athletic competition that, taken together, feel like a tennis fan’s answer to a boxing picture. (Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor's score is insistent and relentless and loud, the techno-inflected answer to a full studio orchestra score in an old Hollywood melodrama.)"
 
Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com  
 
"Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor’s score feels like a sweaty, thumping, barn-burning event in and of itself. The house-inflected tracks throb and sidewind with excitement and menace -- adding a propulsive, glistening intensity to bouts of athleticism on the tennis court or verbal sparring off of it. The virulently danceable soundscape becomes integral to 'Challengers''s central idea -- that the rhythms of a tennis match can be seen as an analog for life and love."
 
Rocco T. Thompson, Slant Magazine 

"But naturally, this wouldn’t work without Guadagnino’s careful hand and editor Marco Costa’s incredible job at making sure this convoluted story doesn’t become too much to handle. Guadagnino knows how to build tension in every scene, whether it’s an unbearable lust that our characters can’t seem to shake, or the intensity of a tennis match where seemingly anything can happen. This is also aided by the thumping, escalating score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross that builds up during the tennis scenes, while Guadagnino puts us right alongside the players, often bouncing us along like we’re the tennis ball going across the court."
 
Ross Bonaime, Collider 
 
"We begin and end at that Challenger tournament, where the sun beats down on a spectacle of unrivalled hotness. The camera, commanded by the cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, seems to be everywhere at once, exulting in the glory of bared chests and sweat-matted leg hair. A thunderous techno score, composed by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, pulses and surges hypnotically beneath the action, never quite drowning out the men’s grunts of effort and release. In the stands, the spectators jerk their heads dutifully left and right, but the camera keeps finding Tashi’s gaze, fixed straight ahead. She alone sees past the individual strokes, and the over-all score, to perceive the deeper psychological game her boys are playing."
 
Justin Chang, The New Yorker 
 
"Guadagnino’s weaving of eroticism into the everyday physicality of high-level athletic training brings to mind earlier cinematic depictions of the way romance and sports can combine, films like Gina Prince-Bythewood’s 2000 directorial debut 'Love and Basketball', Ron Shelton’s 1988 love-triangle baseball classic 'Bull Durham,' or the 1982 Robert Towne drama 'Personal Best,' a lesbian love story set in the world of track and field. 'Challengers' may not be this director’s most psychologically insightful movie -- the characters can at times feel like chess-piece contrivances rather than fully rounded individuals -- but it’s almost certainly his most entertaining and fastest-paced. The thumping EDM score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross lends not only the tennis scenes but several moments of off-court intimacy an atmosphere of pulse-pounding immediacy. And even if, like me, you’re not a sports person, either at the movies or in real life, the stakes of the Phil’s Tire Town Challenger have been so firmly established by the movie’s final scene that, like Zendaya’s Tashi, you’ll find your head swiveling from side to side as if your life’s trajectory hangs on the next bounce of that neon-green ball."
 
Dana Stevens, Slate.com 

"Without revealing anything more it’s apparent that Kuritzkes has fashioned a well-written script. And while it has a nice twist or two, this storyline isn’t exactly groundbreaking. There’s only so much you can conjure with a love triangle story that hasn’t been done before. That’s where Guadagnino comes in and flips this scenario completely on its head. Not only does he push the boundaries on Art and Patrick’s friendship, but the Italian filmmaker uses a glorious late ”90s-esque thumping techno dance music score from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross to increase the tension in the film’s pivotal tennis matches. And then -- almost shockingly -- he layers it over major dramatic moments between the characters. So much so that you may not be able to hear exactly what they are saying in these moments (Christopher Nolan will be so proud). You can’t help but wonder how big a fan Guadagnino is of Tom Twyker’s 1998 classic 'Run Lola Run' which also featured a similar music motif (we’re guessing quite a bit), but it’s such an inspired and gutsy choice you can’t help but smile in how euphorically it works in the film’s final act."
 
Gregory Ellwood, The Playlist

"There’s a loudness to Luca Guadagnino’s Challengers that you might not anticipate, if you primarily associate the director with his melancholy romance 'Call Me By Your Name.' But here, the famed director has traded Sufjan Stevens for Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, delivering a propulsive, captivating, and sometimes horny story of how love and competition might not always be so different. Propelling the on-court action is Reznor and Ross’s score, bringing a level of bombast to the sports action that at times threatens to overwhelm the action, without ever actually proving distracting. (And the closing credits track, 'Compress/Repress,' is flat-out sick, delivering Nine Inch Nails vibes with lyrics by Guadagnino and vocals by Reznor.) In a recent interview with GQ, Reznor and Ross said that they were asked by Guadagnino to create 'very loud techno music' for the soundtrack (Sony Music has just released a nine-track remix of their score). Reznor also noted that Guadagnino’s notes for them were 'all a variation' of three words: 'Unending homoerotic desire.'"
 
Liz Shannon Miller, Consequence 
 
"Another filmmaker might have subtracted himself in order to foreground the story, whereas Guadagnino goes big, leading with style (and a trendy score from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross). In keeping with the athletic theme, he does all kinds of wild things with the camera, including a composition framed from the umpire’s perspective mid-court that zooms along the net to find Tashi in the crowd. Occasionally, she and other characters smack the fluorescent yellow balls directly at the screen, making us flinch in our seats. By the end, 'Challengers' has assumed the ball’s POV -- or maybe it’s the racket’s -- as Guadagnino immerses audiences in the film’s climactic match."
 
Peter Debruge, Variety 

"This is one of the most ravenously sexy American movies in recent memory, an aspect fueled throughout by the hard-driving beats of a hypnotic techno score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, which recalls everything from disco-era Giorgio Moroder to the pulse-pounding EDM of the 21st century’s first two decades, when the story is set. Rather than grab a racket and hit the tennis court, this is a movie that makes you want to get up and dance. Sharp sound work is another essential element, capturing every thwack of the ball with visceral force."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter 
 
REBEL MOON - PART TWO: THE SCARGIVER - Tom Holkenborg
 
"Set to Tom Holkenborg’s bombastic score, Gregorian chanting, and endless pew-pew-pews, 'Rebel Moon - Part Two: The Scargiver' roars and rampages, yet its drama can’t match its aesthetic pomposity. A depressingly thin and lifeless saga of underdogs triumphing in the face of insurmountable odds, it trades only in formula and phony corner-cutting."
 
Nick Schager, The Daily Beast 
 
"A Zack Snyder picture is like everything and nothing else in the galaxy. 'Rebel Moon - Part Two: The Scargiver,' the second half of the director’s hammering saga about a bucolic village at the fringes of the universe forced to fight off its imperial overlords, pulls from as many influences as there are stars in the sky. 'Star Wars,' of course (yes, there are light sabers), and also 'Mad Max,' Caravaggio, John Ford, European art-house cinema, World War II propaganda flicks, steampunk Victoriana, cottagecore girlies on Instagram and Wagner’s 'Götterdämmerung.' Not only does the score boast two types of choirs (haunted child and Gregorian), but a single frame might include a robot dressed like the Green Knight (and voiced by Anthony Hopkins) next to a Conan the Barbarian clone next to some guy in overalls who looks like he just flew in from Bonnaroo. A delirious, pulpy mishmash of knockoffs, 'The Scargiver' isn’t good, but it sure is something."
 
Amy Nicholson, The New York Times 

"And don’t get me wrong: If you want to watch space Nazis fire red laser beams at vaguely Scandinavian farm people during an interminable siege that’s staged with exactly none of the panache and enthusiasm that made even the worst of Snyder’s pre-streaming work feel distinct, you’ve come to the right place. This is the “Citizen Kane” of whatever that is. But first, you’ll have to sit through -- or scrub past -- a full hour of watching Djimon Hounsou, Bae Doona, and the rest of the film’s ensemble cast harvest wheat in slow-motion as the singers on Tom Holkenborg’s appropriately self-serious choral score wail over the soundtrack."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire
 
"The inevitable arrives, and it is noisy, chaotic, excessively overcooked, and just as meaningless as 'Part One,' thus feels like an immense, loud, calamitously desperate attempt at making you care about something that never earned your concern in the first place. 'The Scargiver' is such an oddly distancing and out-of-body experience, with mournful music cues to make you feel sorrowful about something the movie forgot to make you care about. It’s full of huge, swelling grandiosity, and yet it’s all puffed up for nothing because it failed to connect you to its generic characters in its first attempt. All it can do is double down and hope for the best."
 
Rodrigo Perez, The Playlist
 
"Put 'Part One' and 'Part Two' together, and it’s clear that 'Rebel Moon' is a four-hour movie that could have been told in two hours. It’s not really 'epic' -- it’s just stretched-out. In the first half of 'Part Two,' most of which is set on the amber-waves-of-grain medieval farming moon of Veldt, the film just kind of sits there, treading grain, with a soundtrack of New Age Jungian music as the farmers harvest their crop and ready themselves for battle. There are flashbacks that shore up the characters’ valor and fill in the things they feel guilty about (like the fact that Kora, when she was a royal bodyguard and the adoptive daughter of the Imperium commander Balisarius, was ordered to assassinate Princess Issa). The gigantic Motherworld ship arrives just as it did last time, hovering over Veldt in broad daylight, only now Kora is prepared. She, along with Gunnar, infiltrate it in a mini-ship of their own. Once inside, she plants strategic explosives and seeks out her nemesis, and the film cuts to the battle below, which oscillates between rock ‘n’ roll sci-fi gunfire and hand-to-hand savagery and the immensely gratifying ain’t-that-a-kick-in-the-head sight of war ships blowing up from inside, all set to one of those neo-Hans Zimmer scores of droning dread."
 
Owen Gleiberman, Variety 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

May 3
BLACKHAT (Harry Gregson-Williams) [Vidiots]
CARRIE (Pino Donaggio) [Vista]
FEMALE TROUBLE [Nuart]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista]
HIGH AND LOW (Masaru Sato) [New Beverly]
IDIOCRACY (Theodore Shapiro) [Egyptian]
KILL BILL VOL. 1 (RZA) [New Beverly]
MIRACLE MILE (Tangerine Dream) [alamo Drafthouse]
OFFICE SPACE (John Frizzell) [Egyptian]
RUBBER (Mr. Oizo) [Vidiots]
THE SEARCHERS (Max Steiner) [Aero]
TALK TO ME (Cornel Wilczek) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TAXI DRIVER (Bernard Herrmann) [New Beverly]
THE WAR OF THE ROSES (David Newman) [Vidiots]

May 4
BADLANDS (George Aliceson Tipton) [Vidiots]
BIG HERO 6 (Henry Jackman) [Vidiots]
BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (David Newman) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
BREAKING AWAY (Patrick Williams) [New Beverly]
CARRIE (Pino Donaggio) [Vista] 
DUNE (Toto) [Vidiots]
EASY A (Brad Segal) [New Beverly]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista] 
HIGH AND LOW (Masaru Sato) [New Beverly] 
LOST IN YONKERS (Elmer Bernstein) [Los Feliz 3]
MIRACLE MILE (Tangerine Dream) [Alamo Drafthouse]
NEVER A DULL MOMENT (Robert F. Brunner) [Vista]
PRINCE OF DARKNESS (John Carpenter, Alan Howarth) [Los Feliz 3]
RED HOLLYWOOD [Los Feliz 3]
RETURN OF THE JEDI (John Williams) [Academy Museum]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY (Michael Giacchino) [Academy Museum]
THE ROOM (Mladen Milicevic) [Landmark Westwood]
SANTA SANGRE (Simon Boswell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE SEARCHERS (Max Steiner) [Aero]
SECRET SUNSHINE (Christian Basso) [Los Feliz 3]
SPACEBALLS (John Morris) [Egyptian]
THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]

May 5
BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (David Newman) [Alamo Drafthouse]
BORN IN EAST L.A. (Lee Holdridge) [Egyptian]
BREAKING AWAY (Patrick Williams) [New Beverly] 
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (Burt Bacharach) [Vidiots]
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (Tan Dun) [Academy Museum]
DIVORCE ITALIAN STYLE (Carlo Rustichelli) [Los Feliz 3]
DOWN AND OUT IN AMERICA [Los Feliz 3]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista] 
THE GREAT ZIEGFELD [Academy Museum]
GREEN FISH (Lee Dong-jun) [Los Feliz 3]
THE LORD OF FLATBUSH (Joe Brooks) [New Beverly]
NEVER A DULL MOMENT (Robert F. Brunner) [Vista] 
PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE (Paul Williams, Georce Aliceson Tipton) [Vidiots]
RAMBLING ROSE (Elmer Bernstein), INTRODUCING DOROTHY DANDRIDGE (Elmer Bernstein) [Aero]
SANTA SANGRE (Simon Boswell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SHARK TALE (Hans Zimmer) [Egyptian]
THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
WILLOW (James Horner) [Vidiots]

May 6
THE GARBAGE PAIL KIDS MOVIE (Michael Lloyd) [Los Feliz 3]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista]  
GOODBYE, DRAGON INN [Vidiots]
THE MONSTER SQUAD (Bruce Broughton) [Los Feliz 3]
ONE-ARMED BOXER (Fu-Ling Wang), MASTER OF THE FLYING GUILLOTINE (Frankie Chan) [New Beverly]
WHAT'S UP, DOC? (Artie Butler), CLUE (John Morris) [Academy Museum]

May 7
DEATH SPA (Peter Kaye) [Aero]
GIRLFIGHT (Theodore Shapiro)  [Vidiots]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista] 
THE MASK (Randy Edelman), LIAR LIAR (John Debney), DUMB AND DUMBER (Todd Rundgren) [Egyptian]
MIRACLE MILE (Tangerine Dream) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
ONE-ARMED BOXER (Fu-Ling Wang), MASTER OF THE FLYING GUILLOTINE (Frankie Chan) [New Beverly] 

May 8
ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS (Frank Skinner), MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION (Frank Skinner) [New Beverly]
BILL & TED'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (David Newman) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
BRIDGET JONES' DIARY (Patrick Doyle) [Egyptian]
DESERT FURY (Miklos Rozsa) [Los Feliz 3]
DICK TRACY (Danny Elfman) [Academy Museum]
DRIVE (Clint Mansell) [Vidiots]
DROP DEAD FRED (Randy Edelman) [Egyptian]
THE DRY (Peter Raeburn) [Aero]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista]  
NOTTING HILL (Trevor Jones) [Egyptian]
TALK TO ME (Cornel Wilczek) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TRUE GRIT (Carter Burwell) [BrainDead Studios]

May 9
ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS (Frank Skinner), MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION (Frank Skinner) [New Beverly] 
FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL (Richard Rodney Bennett) [Egyptian]
THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY (Ennio Morricone) [Vista]  
THE KING OF COMEDY [Academy Museum]
THE LINGUINI INCIDENT (Thomas Newman) [Vidiots]
SIDEWAYS (Rolfe Kent) [Egyptian]
SIROCCO (George Antheil) [Los Feliz 3]
THIS IS SPINAL TAP [Egyptian]

May 10
DONNIE DARKO (Michael Andrews) [Academy Museum]
FORCE MAJEURE [Alamo Drafthouse]
GOLDEN GATE GIRLS (Robert Ellis-Geiger, Manh Tuan Tran) [UCLA/Hammer]
HOLLYWOOD SHUFFLE (Patrice Rushen, Udi Harpaz) [Egyptian]
I'M GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA (David Michael Frank) [Egyptian]
KILL BILL VOL. 1 (RZA) [New Beverly]
NIGHT ON EARTH (Tom Waits) [BrainDead Studios]
POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE (Carly Simon) [Vidiots]
PULP FICTION [Egyptian]
REPO MAN (Steven Hufsteter, Humberto Larriva) [Nuart]
SCANNERS (Howard Shore) [Vidiots]
SLEEPING BEAUTY (George Bruns), CINDERELLA (Oliver Wallace, Paul J. Smith) [New Beverly]
WILD AT HEART (Angelo Badalamenti) [New Beverly]
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (John Morris) [Egyptian]

May 11
AMERICAN PIE (David Lawrence) [Egyptian]
BLACK GOD, WHITE DEVIL (Sergio Ricardo) [Los Feliz 3]
THE BLOODETTES (Joelle Esso, Adam Zanders), NAKED REALITY (Kimyan Law) [UCLA/Hammer]
CARS (Randy Newman) [New Beverly]
CINEMA PARADISO (Ennio Morricone) [Vidiots]
THE CROW (Graeme Revell) [BrainDead Studios]
CRUEL INTENTIONS (Edward Shearmur) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DOUBLE INDEMNITY (Miklos Rozsa) [Vidiots]
THE FINAL DESTINATION (Brian Tyler) [Landmark Westwood]
GLEN OR GLENDA [Academy Museum]
THE JUNGLE BOOK (George Bruns) [BrainDead Studios]
KEDI (Kira Fontana) [Academy Museum]
MIND GAME (Fayray, Saiichi Yamamoto) [BrainDead Studios]
MEET THE FOCKERS (Randy Newman) [Egyptian]
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY (Bronislau Kaper) [Academy Museum]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PURPLE RAIN (Prince, Michel Colombier) [Egyptian]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart] 
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Vidiots]
SAW (Charlie Clouser) [New Beverly]
SERIAL MOM (Basil Poledouris) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SLEEPING BEAUTY (George Bruns), CINDERELLA (Oliver Wallace, Paul J. Smith) [New Beverly] 
THE SWORD IN THE STONE (George Bruns) [Vidiots]
TELL ME A RIDDLE (Sheldon Shkolnik) [Los Feliz 3]

May 12
BRINGING UP BABY (Roy Webb) [UCLA/Hammer]
CARS (Randy Newman) [New Beverly]
EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE (Son Lux) [Academy Museum]
FREAKY FRIDAY (Rolfe Kent) [Egyptian]
LIMELIGHT (Charles Chaplin, Raymond Rasch, Larry Russell) [Los Feliz 3]
MAMMA MIA! [Alamo Drafthouse]
MOMMIE DEAREST (Henry Mancini) [Egyptian]
A NEW LEAF, CROSSING DELANCEY (Paul Chihara) [Academy Museum]
QUARTIER MOZART, ARISTOTLE'S PLOT [UCLA/Hammer]
RAMBLING ROSE (Elmer Bernstein), INTRODUCING DOROTHY DANDRIDGE (Elmer Bernstein) [Aero]
SERIAL MOM (Basil Poledouris) [Vidiots]
SLEEPING BEAUTY (George Bruns), CINDERELLA (Oliver Wallace, Paul J. Smith) [New Beverly] 
THE SOUND OF MUSIC (Richard Rodgers, Irwin Kostal) [Vidiots]
SPACEBALLS (John Morris) [Fine Arts]
TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY (Brad Fiedel) [Egyptian]
TIME OF THE HEATHEN (Lejaren A. Hiller Jr.)  [Los Feliz 3]
TROOP BEVERLY HILLS (Randy Edelman) [Alamo Drafthouse]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Pemberton); Introducing A.R. Rahman (Rahman); 2 Days in the Valley (Goldsmith); Spider-Man: No Way Home (Giacchino); The Glenn Miller Story (Miller/Gershenson/Mancini); Minari (Mosseri); Bardo, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths (Dessner/Inarritu); Maniac (Chattaway); Overtures (Salieri); Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (DeVol)

Read: A Hole in Space, by Larry Niven

Seen: Boy Kills World; Stress Positions; Challengers; Late Night with the Devil; Bye Bye Birdie; Drive-In; Hot Stuff; Air Force One; In the Line of Fire

Watched: Kolchak: The Night Stalker ("Horror in the Heights"); Danger Man ("The Conspirators"); Caravans

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Comments (4):Log in or register to post your own comments
One of my favorite parts of the Friday blog is the listing of all the special screenings here in LA for the next 10 days, as I sometimes forget to check each theater individually. I'm a member of the American Cinematheque and noticed recently how I will see movies listed on Scott's blog that are playing at The Egyptian, but then I go to the AC site to buy tickets and see nothing listed there for The Egyptian, just the Aero and Los Feliz 3. Did I miss a memo? Is this all due to Netflix buying The Egyptian?

One of my favorite parts of the Friday blog is the listing of all the special screenings here in LA for the next 10 days, as I sometimes forget to check each theater individually. I'm a member of the American Cinematheque and noticed recently how I will see movies listed on Scott's blog that are playing at The Egyptian, but then I go to the AC site to buy tickets and see nothing listed there for The Egyptian, just the Aero and Los Feliz 3. Did I miss a memo? Is this all due to Netflix buying The Egyptian?

The Egyptian has been having their own screenings unrelated to American Cinematheque, such as a 1974 anniversary series (I caught The Phantom of Liberty on 35mm) and currently several other anniversary screenings (including a 20th anniversary of Shark Tale!).

This site should have all the screenings there, both Cinematheque and otherwise.

https://www.egyptiantheatre.com/

One of my favorite parts of the Friday blog is the listing of all the special screenings here in LA for the next 10 days, as I sometimes forget to check each theater individually. I'm a member of the American Cinematheque and noticed recently how I will see movies listed on Scott's blog that are playing at The Egyptian, but then I go to the AC site to buy tickets and see nothing listed there for The Egyptian, just the Aero and Los Feliz 3. Did I miss a memo? Is this all due to Netflix buying The Egyptian?

I wish had such a cinema here in Montreal. Until the mid eighties, we had several repertory theatres, but the advent of the VCR quickly killed them. By the early nineties, their numbers had dwindled to next to nothing.

The Netflix part of the Egyptian just announced a very cool series to tie in with Linklater's new HIT MAN, with screenings including (many on 35mm) Bullitt, In Bruges, Prizzi's Honor, and a particular favorite of mine, Miike's 13 Assassins.

https://www.egyptiantheatre.com/series/trigger-happy-hit-men-with-a-punchline

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