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La-La Land has announced two upcoming releases expected the week after next -- a three-disc set ("Volume One"!) of music from Irwin Allen's '60s sci-fi TV series THE TIME TUNNEL, featuring music composed for the series by Robert Drasnin, Lyn Murray, Paul Sawtell, and that other guy, what's his name...oh yes, John Williams; and Fred Mollin's score for the seagoing slasher sequel FRIDAY THE 13TH PART VIII: JASON TAKES MANHATTAN (the only film in the original series for which Harry Manfredini did not recieve full or shared scoring credit).

For those who may be interested in what exactly constitutes an award-qualifying film for the upcoming Oscars, the Academy has announced the Reminder List of eligible films for the 2020 awards (which includes films released through the end of February 2021). Nominations will be announced on March 15th, and the awards will be handed out on April 25th.

Fun fact: last Christmas's big DC Comics superhero spectacular is officially listed as WW84. I guess the studio used up their allotment of letters on Birds of Prey and The Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Ulysse 31 - Denny Crockett, Ike Egan, Shuki Levy, Haim Saban, Seji Suzuki - CSC


IN THEATERS TODAY

Raya and the Last Dragon, the latest animated feature from Disney, opens in theaters this week with a score by James Newton Howard. No score CD has been announced yet, but both Mulan and Soul had score CDs released overseas, so there's always hope. 
COMING SOON

March 12
Adventures in Dinosaur City
 - Frederic Ensign Teetsel - Dragon's Domain
His Dark Materials: Season Two
 - Lorne Balfe - Silva
The Mark Snow Collection Vol. 3: Southern Gothic
 - Mark Snow - Dragon's Domain
Vampirella
 - Joel Goldsmith - Dragon's Domain
March 19
Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan - Fred Mollin - La-La Land
The Time Tunnel: Volume One - Robert Drasnin, Lyn Murray, Paul Sawtell, John Williams - La-La Land
March 26
The Tattooed Torah - Daniel Alcheh - Notefornote

Date Unknown
The Bear (re-issue)
 - Philippe Sarde - Music Box
I Malamondo
 - Ennio Morricone - Sugar/CAM
Mondo Cane
 - Riz Ortolani - Sugar/CAM
The Serpent (re-issue) 
- Ennio Morricone - Music Box

THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

March 5 - Heitor Villa-Lobos born (1887)
March 5 - Harry Lubin born (1906)
March 5 - Max Steiner's score for The Informer wins the Oscar; Academy policy at the time awards to the score to the head of the studio's music branch -- who, in this case, is Max Steiner (1936)
March 5 - Bruce Smeaton born (1938)
March 5 - Robert Folk born (1949)
March 5 - Michael Gore born (1951)
March 5 - Sergei Prokofiev died (1953)
March 5 - Graham Reynolds born (1971)
March 5 - John Williams begins recording his score to Star Wars (1977)
March 5 - Bruce Broughton records his Emmy-winning score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “The Satyr” (1981)
March 5 - Maurice Jarre begins recording his score for A Walk in the Clouds (1995)
March 5 - Theodore Shapiro begins recording his score for Idiocracy (2005)
March 5 - Gustavo Santaolalla wins his first Oscar, for the Brokeback Mountain score (2006)
March 5 - Jacques Loussier died (2019)
March 6 - Stephen Schwartz born (1948)
March 6 - Leonard Rosenman records his score for the Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “Beast in View” (1964)
March 6 - Richard Hageman died (1966)
March 6 - Erik Nordgren died (1992)
March 6 - Robert B. Sherman died (2012)
March 7 - King Kong premieres in New York (1933)
March 7 - Miklos Rozsa wins his first Oscar for Spellbound score (1946)
March 7 - Sidney Cutner’s score for The Invaders episode “The Condemned” is recorded (1967)
March 7 - Alex Somers born (1984)
March 7 - Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Allegiance" (1990)
March 7 - Recording sessions begin for John Ottman’s score for X2 (2003)
March 7 - Gordon Parks died (2006)
March 7 - Michael Giacchino wins his first Oscar for Up (2010)
March 8 - Dick Hyman born (1927)
March 8 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941)
March 8 - Bruce Broughton born (1945)
March 8 - Jerry Goldsmith records his score for the pilot to Dr. Kildare (1961)
March 8 - Alex North begins recording his unused score for Sounder (1972)
March 8 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording orchestral cues for Logan's Run score (1976)
March 8 - Dave Grusin begins recording his score for Murder by Death (1976)
March 8 - Paul Chihara begins recording his score, adapted from Gilbert & Sullivan, for The Bad News Bears Go to Japan (1978)
March 8 - William Walton died (1983)
March 8 - James Newton Howard begins recording his score for Dave (1993)
March 8 - John Williams begins recording his score for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)
March 8 - George Martin died (2016)
March 9 - John Cale born (1940)
March 9 - Arlon Ober born (1943)
March 9 - Mark Mancina born (1957)
March 9 - Bernard Herrmann begins recording his score for Psycho (1960)
March 9 - Deborah Lurie born (1974)
March 9 - Jane Antonia Cornish born (1975)
March 9 - Bill Conti begins recording his score for Wrongfully Accused (1998)
March 9 - Richard Stone died (2001)
March 9 - Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson died (2004)
March 10 - Arthur Honegger born (1892)
March 10 - Angela Morley/Wally Stott born (1924)
March 10 - Charles Previn, head of the Universal Music Department, wins the Score Oscar for One Hundred Men and a Girl, for which no composer is credited (1938)
March 10 - Brad Fiedel born (1951)
March 10 - Marc Donahue born (1953)
March 10 - Uwe Fahrenkrog-Petersen born (1960)
March 10 - Michel Legrand records his score for Summer of ’42 (1971)
March 10 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for The Swarm (1978)
March 10 - Bruce Broughton begins recording his score for Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (1992)
March 11 - Gottfried Huppertz born (1887)
March 11 - Astor Piazzolla born (1921)
March 11 - Recording sessions begin for Bronislau Kaper's score to Lili (1952)
March 11 - David Newman born (1954)
March 11 - Don Ellis begins recording his score for French Connection II (1975)
March 11 - Rob Simonsen born (1978)
March 11 - Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Heart of Glory" (1988)
March 11 - Paul Dunlap died (2010)
March 11 - Francois-Eudes Chanfrault died (2016)
March 11 - Keith Emerson died (2016)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

AMERICAN SKIN - Henry Jackman
 
"Judging by Henry Jackman’s mournful and melodramatic horn score, it seems like this is shaping up to be an intimate rendering of a tragically familiar tale. The writing is streaked with the same kind of holy clumsiness that once made '7th Heaven' such a hit, but Parker radiates enough raw earnestness to make it work. Whatever his failings as a person, he’s always been an innately charismatic screen presence (go watch 'Beyond the Lights'). That warmth, however, has its limits."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire

"One of the cringiest moments of Parker’s directorial debut, 'The Birth of a Nation,' involved playing Nina Simone’s 'Strange Fruit' over footage of lynched men, as though the visual weren’t horrifying enough on its own, or as if matching that song to that footage wasn’t redundant and obvious. His instinct for overplaying the musical cues continues in 'American Skin,' with composer Henry Jackman ('Detective Pickachu') bombastically underlining and italicizing moments that don’t need the extra emphasis."
 
Alonso Duralde, The Wrap

BLITHE SPIRIT - Simon Boswell
 
"The framing is bafflingly inert: there are all these long shots, with people just standing around talking to each other. Charles and Ruth's house looks like an Art Deco-'Miami Vice' mashup, and none of the interiors are explored for their comedic potential. Everything feels like an old-fashioned sit-com, with people entering and leaving rooms, nothing 'added,' no comedic bits, no character business, no inventive blocking. A couple of old-fashioned pratfalls would have been welcome. Music plays underneath every scene, adding to the bland generic vibe."
 
Sheila O'Malley, RogerEbert.com 
 
BREAKING NEWS IN YUBA COUNTY - Jeff Beal
 
"As the police detective who sees through Sue's story, Regina Hall rises above the rising tide of cartoonishness with some smooth double takes and no-nonsense energy. The rest of the cast's energy is more on the order of deeply unmodulated playacting -- Wanda Sykes as Petey's furniture-store boss, Ellen Barkin as her girlfriend, the diminishing returns of Awkwafina's menacing gangster routine. There are also valiant attempts to make random and unconvincing characters ring true (Samira Wiley as Petey's pregnant-with-twins partner). The assemblage of bad hair and the jaunty score signal that we're not supposed to take any of this seriously. Still, it's distracting when the costumes and interiors have more character-defining subtlety than the barely dimensional characters themselves."
 
Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter

DEAD PIGS - Andrew Orkin
 
"Demonstrating a light touch -- underscored by a whimsy-leaning score and overtly comic moments, but never delving into flimsiness or farce -- Yan handles her chosen topic, and the tapestry of tales it’s woven through, with care. Coupled with the naturalistic tones prominent in cinematographer Federico Cesca’s ('Patti Cake$') lensing, it’s an approach that mostly resonates. It may, however, struggle to turn its World Cinema Dramatic Competition berth into anything beyond modest festival and eventual streaming play."
 
Sarah Ward, Screen Daily
 
EMBATTLED - Michael Brook
 
"Though he’s still an academically struggling high school senior, Jett’s fledgling MMA career starts picking up steam, thanks to his father’s string-pulling. Rather than bringing them together, the teen’s early success only damages his already hot-and-cold relationship with Cash: perhaps because it highlights the older man’s impending career downturn, perhaps more simply because it diverts attention from him for a moment or two. The building aggression between them must come to a head: a climactic clash looms, both inevitable and preposterous, as 'Embattled' abandons any pretense of gritty realism and dials up the knucklehead wish-fulfillment as hard as it (and Michael Brook’s thumping, crashing synthetic score) can go."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety

I CARE A LOT - Marc Canham
 
"The film does not suffer much for these slight incongruities. 'I Care a Lot' glides like a classic studio thriller thanks to top-notch production values, from the bright colors that explode off the screen to a synthesized score that throbs tensely throughout. And, of course, there’s the Rosamund Pike factor. It’s not that anyone else in the movie isn’t good. But no one ever quite matches the unrivaled brilliance of Pike when given a clear runway to strut her skills. Seeing her in peak form nimbly navigating the tonal minefield of this late stage capitalism critique is an absolute delight."
 
Marshall Shaffer, The Playlist

"When Jennifer is taken and we see the geriatric abduction process start to finish, Blakeson cranks the discomfort. It’s despicable stuff, made as insufferable as possible by its actresses’ shit-eating grins and the electronica behind it all thrumming like a headache. Slo-mo montages -- with the over-the-top colors and stretched smiling faces of an uncomfortable dream that doesn’t click as a nightmare until you’re in too deep to get yourself out -- take us through the nuts and bolts. The hyper-styled crooks are shot with an ethereal glow by cinematographer Doug Emmett, whose blend of light and color create a harsh brightness just as off-putting as the soundscape. It takes the tropical palette of retirement doc 'Some Kind of Heaven' and makes it far more sinister: More 'Escape from Tomorrow' than Disney World."
 
Jacob Oller, Paste Magazine

"The twisty acceleration of reciprocal payback moves is gruesome fun, if not always entirely plausible. But Blakeson and editor Mark Eckersley keep the pace zippy and the plotting taut, despite its density of incident. The sinister techno score by Marc Canham also helps maintain the momentum, while DP Doug Emmett ('Sorry to Bother You') provides a sleek visual canvas."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter

LAND - Ben Sollee, Time For Three

"Aiding Bukowski’s sun-dappled visuals is the score by Ben Sollee and Time for Three, a lush collection of folk-soaked cues that both immerse viewers in Edee’s neo-Western environment and touch on the aching, unrelenting pain Wright stuffs into every wounded gesture and expression. Plucked strings and double bass permeate the score’s texture, the occasional discordant string leaving a pang of unease in the film’s otherwise-lush textures -- echoing, presumably, Edee’s aimless drifting through the rocky currents of her grief."
 
Clint Worthington, Consequence of Sound

"The movie is so visually striking, it’s no surprise that Wright worked with two top editors, Anne McCabe ('A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood') and Mikkel E.G. Nielsen ('Sound of Metal'). The strings-heavy score from composers Ben Sollee and Time for Three also offers effective support, as it fluctuates in discreet unison with Edee’s experiences."
 
Elizabeth Weitzman, The Wrap

"For a time, the film is wordless as, with the everyday business of her survival, Edee tries to distract herself from the everyday emptiness of her life. This is the 'All is Lost'- type film that initially 'Land' teases, a sinewy solo survival thriller, before then suggesting a more interior, psychodramatic approach as she starts to see her husband and son running alongside her through the forest or downstream fishing from the same bank. Then winter comes, and there’s a bear attack, which robs her of most of her food, and a strangely placed drone shot that, floating over the cabin accompanied by a particularly ominous stretch of Ben Sollee‘s score, even hints at nature-horror."
 
Jessica Kiang, The Playlist 
 
"Elsewhere, the stirring minor-key string score is a fine match for this story's quiet directness and its yearning mix of calamity, beauty, deprivation and unexpected gifts. Without a drop of self-congratulatory 'enlightenment,' 'Land' occupies a wild terrain of ineffable tenderness."
 
Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter

MY PSYCHEDELIC LOVE STORY - Paul Leonard-Morgan
 
"While 'Wormwood' unfolded through ominous interrogation sessions and spooky hotel room reenactments, 'My Psychedelic Love Story' gives Morris the chance to show his gentler side, resulting in a sensitive, bittersweet romance that ranks as his most satisfying movie in years. Admittedly, the movie sometimes presses too hard on the style button, turning the Morris algorithm up to 11, from Paul Leonard-Morgan’s euphoric score to a restless editing strategy that amounts to feature-length montage. But even then, it’s a welcome return to form for a filmmaker whose form is all about the slippery search for truth."
 
Eric Kohn, IndieWire

SATOR - Jordan Graham
 
"Mixing black and white, low-resolution footage with more colourful material creates a bricolage-like effect that keeps wrong-footing the viewer. Graham uses darkness and a very sparse score/soundscape to create a truly disturbing work that relies not so much on gore as the uncanny in its most potent form: stillness, pools of darkness and just-visible figures. I’ve watched dozens of films at home since lockdown, and this is one of the few I wish I could have seen in a blacked-out cinema."
 
Leslie Felperin, The Guardian

THE WORLD TO COME - Daniel Blumberg

"André Chemetoff‘s photography is gorgeously stark, often finding high drama in the elements -- as when a terrifying and destructive blizzard keeps the women separated for a time. And Daniel Blumberg‘s music is another crucially expressive element, its lonesome, atonal whines, and drones adding atmosphere largely without the emotional manipulation of melody. If there is a flaw in Fastvold’s approach, it’s that the exceptional elements she assembles, from performance to costuming to imagery to sound design, all become somewhat secondary to the words, perhaps a factor of two novelists writing the screenplay. Structured around Abigail’s diary entries -- admittedly beautifully written, full of faltering lyricism that creates metaphors for longing and yearning from the waterfalls and leaves and precipices of the unforgiving surrounding landscape -- it’s a film that tends to tell more than it shows. This subdues the drama and sometimes tamps down the embers of the story -- a kind of 'Portrait of a Lady on Low Heat' -- when we might wish to see them set on fire."
 
Jessica Kiang, The Playlist

"Part of this can be chalked up to the overall formality of the piece, and part of it to the stiff chemistry between Waterston and Kirby, who are more believable in the hesitant early stages than after they’re consumed with ardor. Fastvold also chooses to withhold the film’s more explicit sexuality until long after Abigail and Tallie’s furtive afternoons together have ended -- a decision that, along with keeping the worst of Finney’s violence toward Tallie off screen, further places tangible human physicality at a remove. Daniel Blumberg’s odd, experimental score, more effective at conveying stinging ice whipping faces than a tender moment between lovers, adds to the alienation. Yes, this is ultimately a tragic story of squashed passions and dreams deferred. But the disappointing irony of Casey Affleck -- a man twice sued for sexual harassment -- giving the most soulful performance in a film about women in love cannot be overstated."
 
Katie Rife, The Onion AV Club

"Through all this emotional turmoil, something remains curiously overformal in 'World to Come.' Clad in the era’s tight corsets, full skirts, and daintily cut blouses (looking all too clean considering the rough and rural environment), Waterston and Kirby don’t quite manage to sell their chemistry to the audience. Often, you feel forced to accept the former’s sad history double as depth, and the latter’s long, curiously immaculate red curls straight out of Pixar’s 'Brave' as mystique. But the emotional substance to back these cues rarely emerges in the film. Daniel Blumberg’s moody score of affecting woodwinds and strings tries to fill in for some of that shortage. So does André Chemetoff’s expansively pastoral cinematography, whose magical touch on the vibrant exteriors and cozily-lit interiors of candles and log fires stood out even on this critic’s low-quality digital screener. But the film’s general lifelessness nevertheless persists."
 
Tomris Laffly, RogerEbert.com

"Has Tallie been with a woman before? Has any woman been with a woman before? Abigail doesn’t know the answers to these questions, or even how to ask them. All she knows is that the house seems warmer after Tallie’s visits. The swirling winds of Daniel Blumberg’s clarinet score -- which can whip into a winter storm at a moment’s notice -- grow as warm and soothing as an orange hearth. And a story that opens with the grief-stricken chill of a rustic horror movie starts to pull focus away from its monsters, eventually settling into a harsh but hypnotic love story less rewarding to watch than it is to remember."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire
 
"Fastvold doesn’t resist the obviousness of her film’s seasonal metaphors, but doesn’t overwork them other: This is filmmaking as attuned to incremental shifts in light and landscape (Romania’s, in fact, gorgeously filling in for undeveloped upstate New York) as the ebb and flow of a character’s interior joy, written in a face unaccustomed to smiling. Matching the film’s variable physical and emotional temperatures throughout, a marvelous score by avant-garde British musician Daniel Blumberg is full of unexpected woodwind breezes and sharp percussive intrusions."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety

"Daniel Blumberg's supple score, by turns mournful, playfully jazzy and full of roiling menace, is one of several other contributions that collectively create an impression of sensitive craftsmanship. Luckily for 'The World to Come,' that impression lingers longer than the film's aggravations."
 
Jon Frosch, The Hollywood Reporter

THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
SeaQuest DSV (Debney), Ogro (Morricone), The Running Man (Faltermeyer), Fahrenheit 451/Walking Distance (Herrmann), Dragged Across Concrete (Herriott/Zahler), Filmtracks II: The Best of British Film Music (various), The Blue Max/Themes & Suites (Goldsmith), Gloria Bell (Herbert), A White House Cantata (Bernstein), Agatha (Blake), Symphony No. 5 (Mahler), First Love (Endo), Cult Themes from 70's: Volume One (various), Kedi (Fontana), 2001: A Space Odyssey (North), The Cured (Friers/Kennedy), The Hummingbird Project (Gourmeur), Is Paris Burning? (Jarre), Le Professionel (Morricone), The First Monday in May (Hultquist/Hultquist), The Bride Wore Black (Herrmann), Replicas (Ojeda/Killian), The Book Thief (Williams), Always at the Carlyle (Ross), My Fair Lady (Loewe), Destination Wedding (Ross), Symphony No. 3 (Saint-Saens), Rambo: Last Blood (Tyler), Kind of Blue (Davis), Music from the Documentaries (Waxman), Around the World in 80 Days (Young), What Happened to Monday (Wibe)

Read: The Secret of Chimneys, by Agatha Christie

Seen: With theaters able to re-open in New York City, Warner Bros. has announced plans to (re)release Tenet there. I am of course in Los Angeles, awaiting the vaccine...

Watched: The Secret of Treasure Island ("The Isle of Fear," "The Ghost Talks," "The Phantom Dust," "Buried Alive"); Dressed to Kill [1946]; Star Trek: Picard ("Absolute Candor"); Westworld ("Passed Pawn"); The Grand Dame [1931]; The Secret of Treasure Island ("The Girl Who Vanished"); Nine O'Clock Folks [1931]; The Secret of Treasure Island ("Trapped by the Flood"); Hot News Margie [1931]; September 30, 1955; The Good Place ("Tahani Al Jamil"); The Secret of Treasure Island ("The Cannon Roars"); The Mild West [1933]; Gilmore Girls ("Paris Is Burning"); The Man Who Dared [1939]; Star Trek: Picard ("Stardust City Rag"); The Secret of Treasure Island ("The Circle of Death"); Roof Tops of Manhattan [1935]; Westworld ("Crisis Theory")
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Comments (12):Log in or register to post your own comments
I truly enjoy your "respect" for John Williams

I hope no one misinterprets my quasi-joke as anything less than total love and respect for Mr. Williams.

I hope no one misinterprets my quasi-joke as anything less than total love and respect for Mr. Williams.

Well, I thought it was funny.

I was attempting what they call in journalism "burying the lede." (I still don't know why it's lede and not lead; I first heard the term in Broadcast News. I should probably look it up).

ADDED:

According to Wiktionary:

Mid-20th century neologism from a deliberate misspelling of lead, intended to avoid confusion with its homograph meaning a strip of type metal used for positioning type in the frame.[1] Compare hed (“headline”) and dek (“subhead”).

I was attempting what they call in journalism "burying the lede." (I still don't know why it's lede and not lead; I first heard the term in Broadcast News. I should probably look it up).

ADDED:

According to Wiktionary:

Mid-20th century neologism from a deliberate misspelling of lead, intended to avoid confusion with its homograph meaning a strip of type metal used for positioning type in the frame.[1] Compare hed (“headline”) and dek (“subhead”).


***

I never knew it was "lede" until now, because I've only heard it, never read it. Now that I know, I will do my best to forget it, since I sometimes speak it but to date have never had to write it. (And I'll bet if I ever do write "bury the lede" to a friend they'll correct my spelling/typo or else ask me what the hell is a lede. But thanks -- I learn something new every day.)

Yeah, it's really confusing that it means "lead" but is spelled "lede" for reasons known only to journalism history.

But since it actually does mean "lead," I don't think you could call "lede" a typo.

(Still trying to figure how to defend my inexplicable love for John Frankenheimer's Prophecy).

Yeah, it's really confusing that it means "lead" but is spelled "lede" for reasons known only to journalism history.

But since it actually does mean "lead," I don't think you could call "lede" a typo.

(Still trying to figure how to defend my inexplicable love for John Frankenheimer's Prophecy).


"Typo" was me joking about an inaginary friend's possible reaction. But get this -- What's the first thing I see this morning in my New York Times? A book review that begins with these words: "WHY BURY THE LEDE?"

What are the odds?!

"A lot o' people don't realize what's really going on. They view life as a bunch o' unconnected incidents 'n things. They don't realize that there's this, like, lattice o' coincidence that lays on top o' everything. Give you an example; show you what I mean: suppose you're thinkin' about a plate o' shrimp. Suddenly someone'll say, like, plate, or shrimp, or plate o' shrimp out of the blue, no explanation. No point in lookin' for one, either. It's all part of a cosmic unconsciousness."

"A lot o' people don't realize what's really going on. They view life as a bunch o' unconnected incidents 'n things. They don't realize that there's this, like, lattice o' coincidence that lays on top o' everything. Give you an example; show you what I mean: suppose you're thinkin' about a plate o' shrimp. Suddenly someone'll say, like, plate, or shrimp, or plate o' shrimp out of the blue, no explanation. No point in lookin' for one, either. It's all part of a cosmic unconsciousness."

Whose name comes after the quotation marks? I'm not all that well-read...

It's Tracey Walter's speech from the 1984 movie Repo Man.

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April 14
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Elisabeth Lutyens died (1983)
Georges Delerue wins his only Oscar, for A Little Romance's score; David Shire wins song Oscar for Norma Rae's "It Goes Like It Goes" (1980)
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