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The latest release from Intrada is a greatly expanded, three-disc edition of James Horner's score for WINDTALKERS, director John Woo's World War II adventure drama from 2002 starring Nicolas Cage and Adam Beach, featuring Horner's lengthy original score, a handful of extras, plus the original CD sequencing.


Varese Sarabande has announced their latest Limited Edition expanded CD Club releases - Carter Burwell's very first film score, for the Coen Brothers' feature filmmaking debut BLOOD SIMPLE; and Charles Bernstein's score for the 1986 horror comedy APRIL FOOL'S DAY.


The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles has announced their third screening series showcasing film scores. Following a 2021 series of films scored by women composers and a 2022/2023 series of Family Matinees and Oscar Sundays spotlighting the Oscar nominated music of John Williams, the Academy Museum is presenting ENNIO MORRICONE: ESSENTIAL SCORES FROM A MOVIE MAESTRO, including several films in their Oscar Sundays series. Here is the list of Morricone-related screenings: 

October 1 - CINEMA PARADISO
October 4 - ENNIO
October 6 - THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY
October 8 - DAYS OF HEAVEN
October 21 - ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST
October 22 - THE UNTOUCHABLES
October 27 - THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS
October 28 - THE LIZARDS (I BASILISCHI)
October 29 - THE HATEFUL EIGHT
November 3 - TEOREMA with FISTS IN THE POCKET
November 4 - THAT SPLENDID NOVEMBER
November 4 - INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN ABOVE SUSPICION with A QUIET PLACE IN THE COUNTRY
November 9 - SACCO AND VANZETTI
November 10 - TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA
November 11 - 1900
November 16 - THE DESERT OF THE TARTARS
November 18 - ALLONSANFAN
November 18 - THE BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE
November 25 - ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Excessive Force II: Force on Force
 - Kevin Kiner - Dragons' Domain [CD-R] 
Gorky Park - James Horner - La-La Land
Il sole buio/L'angelo con la pistola
 - Riz Ortolani - Beat  
The Lost World: Jurassic Park - John Williams - La-La Land 
Obsession [re-issue]
- Bernard Herrmann - Music Box
Un sacco bello
 - Ennio Morricone - Beat    
Windtalkers
- James Horner - Intrada Special Collection 


IN THEATERS TODAY

Aporia - H. Scott Salinas
Between Two Worlds - Mathieu Lamboley
Heart of Stone - Steven Price
Jules - Volker Bertelmann
The Last Voyage of the Demeter - Bear McCreary
Men of Deeds - Marius Leftarache
The Monkey King - Toby Chu
The Pod Generation - Sacha & Evgueni Galperine
With This Light - Nora Kroll-Rosenbaum
The Wife and Her House Husband - James Welland


COMING SOON

August 18
April Fool's Day: The Deluxe Edition - Charles Bernstein - Varese Sarabande CD Club
Blood Simple: The Deluxe Edition - Carter Burwell - Varese Sarabande CD Club
The Super Mario Bros. Movie - Brian Tyler - iam8bit  
December 1
Scream VI - Brian Tyler, Sven Faulconer - Varese Sarabande
Date Unknown

Blondie - Mark Ronson, Andrew Wyatt - Waxwork
The Bruce Rowland Collection: Vol. 1
 - Bruce Rowland - Buysoundtrax
The Daniel Licht Collection: Vol. 1 - Daniel Licht - Dragon's Domain
Gli Italiani e l'industria
 - Piero Umiliani - Kronos 
Good Guys Wear Black/Silent Rage
 - Craig Safan, Peter Bernstein, Mark Goldenberg - Dragon's Domain
Le as de la jungle 2 - Operation Tour Du Monde
- Olivier Cussac- Music Box 
Lee Holdridge Documentaries Vol. 1
 - Lee Holdridge - Dragon's Domain
Oppenheimer - Ludwig Goransson - Mondo
The Punisher
- Dennis Dreith - Notefornote


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

August 11 - Ron Grainer born (1922)
August 11 - Raymond Leppard born (1927)
August 11 - Miklos Rozsa begins recording his score for The Light Touch (1951)
August 11 - Joe Jackson born (1954)
August 11 - Richard Shores begins recording his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Eccentrics” (1966)
August 11 - Ali Shaheed Muhammad born (1970)
August 11 - Patrick Williams records his score for The Streets of San Francisco episode “The Glass Dart Board” (1975)
August 11 - Bill Conti begins recording his score for Five Days from Home (1977)
August 11 - Toby Chu born (1977)
August 11 - Emile Mosseri born (1985)
August 11 - Don Davis begins recording his score for The Matrix Revolutions (2003)
August 12 - David Lee born (1926)
August 12 - David Munrow born (1942)
August 12 - Victor Young begins recording his score for The Accused (1948)
August 12 - Mark Knopfler born (1949)
August 12 - Pat Metheny born (1954)
August 12 - Peter Peter born (1960)
August 12 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score to The Traveling Executioner (1970)
August 12 - Hugo Montenegro records his only Mission: Impossible episode score, for “The Rebel” (1970)
August 12 - Marty Paich died (1995)
August 12 - Zacarias M. de la Riva born (1972)
August 13 - John Ireland born (1879)
August 13 - Dennis Farnon born (1923)
August 13 - John Cacavas born (1930)
August 13 - Richard Shores records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Big Blackmail” (1968)
August 13 - Gerald Fried writes his final Mission: Impossible score, for “The Code” (1969)
August 13 - Richard LaSalle records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “The Mechanical Man” (1969)
August 13 - Patrick Williams records his score for The Streets of San Francisco episode “Going Home” (1973)
August 13 - Zdenek Liska died (1983)
August 13 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Warlock (1988)
August 13 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score to Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)
August 13 - John Ottman begins recording his score to Gothika (2003)
August 13 - Roque Banos records his score for Oldboy (2013)
August 14 - Lee Zahler born (1893)
August 14 - Edmund Meisel born (1894)
August 14 - James Horner born (1953)
August 14 - Oscar Levant died (1972)
August 14 - Patrick Williams records his score for The Streets of San Francisco episode “The Thirty-Year Pin” (1972)
August 14 - Michael McCormack born (1973)
August 15 - Jacques Ibert born (1890)
August 15 - Ned Washington born (1901)
August 15 - Jimmy Webb born (1946)
August 15 - Lalo Schifrin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Memory” (1966)
August 15 - Duane Tatro’s score for The Invaders episode “The Saucer” is recorded (1967)
August 15 - Henry Mancini begins recording his score for Harry and Son (1983)
August 15 - Bruce Broughton begins recording his score for George Washington II: The Forging of a Nation (1986) 
August 15 - Ronald Stein died (1988)
August 15 - Ron Jones records his pilot score for the animated Superman series (1988)
August 15 - Cesk Zadeja died (1997)
August 16 - John Williams records the third season theme for Lost in Space (1967)
August 16 - Bruno Nicolai died (1991)
August 16 - Miles Goodman died (1996)
August 16 - Tadashi Hattori died (2008)
August 16 - Alan Silvestri wins Emmys for Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’s main title theme and its premiere episode score; David Arnold and Michael Price win for Sherlock’s “His Last Vow” (2014)
August 17 - Lisa Coleman born (1960)
August 17 - Ernest Gold bgins recording his score for A Child Is Waiting (1962)
August 17 - Vivek Maddala born (1973)
August 17 - John Williams begins recording his score for Black Sunday (1976)
August 17 - Johnny Harris records his score for The New Adventures of Wonder Woman episode “The Deadly Sting” (1978)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

BIOSPHERE - Danny Besnsi, Saunder Jurriaans
 
"We see Billy's flaws without him holding back just as we begin to see his capacity for change. It is existential without feeling weighty in a way that could be disappointing, but it also feels authentic in how it captures how people make sense of upheavals in their life. Much of this falls on Brown’s shoulders and he carries this weight like it was nothing. Just as he did in last year’s 'Honk for Jesus. Save Your Soul,' he can shift between being sharply funny in one moment and more conflicted in another. What makes it so interesting here is how the emotion starting to take hold of Ray will rise up when you least expect it with some monologues that he gives seeming like they could blow the roof off of the tiny home the two have built for themselves. When complimented by the wondrous score by Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurriaans, it takes on a transcendent quality that breaks free of any and all limitations."
 
Chase Hutchinson, Collider 
 
COBWEB - Drum & Lace (Sofia degli Alessandri-Hulquist)
 
"Director Samuel Bodin may arguably still be most famous for co-directing 2008 fan film 'Batman: Ashes to Ashes,' which applied the 'Sin City' black, white, and red color palette to the mythos of the world's greatest detective. In those 17 minutes, he displayed a mastery of both dread and visual flair, both of which he exhibits again with equal control and creativity, and suitably complemented by the toy box rhythms and playground chants of Drum & Lace (aka Italian sonic artist Sofia degli Alessandri-Hultquist)."
 
Richard Whittaker, The Austin Chronicle

"In defense of the credited writer, Chris Thomas Devlin, so much can happen between page and screen, including uninspired direction (by Samuel Bodin), twinkly insta-scoring (by Italian trip-hopper Drum & Lace) and generically murky cinematography (by Philip Lozano)."
 
Joshua Rothkopf, Los Angeles Times

OPPENHEIMER - Ludwig Göransson 

"'Oppenheimer''s ever-present score by Ludwig Göransson accompanies nearly every moment of the film, knowing exactly when to pull back, or when to provoke the audience with the sounds of a ticking clock or static underneath the onslaught of an orchestra fully enveloping the viewer in sound. Nolan and van Hoytema’s visuals are always impressive, but it’s Göransson’s score that takes 'Oppenheimer' to another level, and continues to prove that he’s one of the most exciting composers working in film today.
 
Ross Bonaime, Collider 

"For all his intellectualism, Nolan is also a broad-brush populist, and as ever, the clash of these instincts leads to some gauche, goofy moments, like the early scenes of Oppenheimer studiously reading T.S. Eliot’s 'The Waste Land' and pondering a Picasso. Sometimes Nolan seems insecure working outside of his usual thriller mode. Ludwig Göransson’s insistent, nervy score is overused throughout, harrying the dizzying montage of Oppenheimer’s life into an almost comical blur when it would be better to let the drama breathe."
 
Oli Welsh, Polygon 
 
"But Nolan doesn’t hold this all together alone. He has plenty of help from a team of collaborators bringing their best, from the gorgeous cinematography of Hoyte van Hoytema -- who captures everything from New Mexico snow to black-and-white Senate hearings with searing power -- to the blistering, relentless score of Ludwig Göransson that makes you feel every beat. If you’re going to see 'Oppenheimer,' though, it’s not just because it’s a movie full of stars. Odds are you’re turning up at the theater to see how Christopher Nolan films one of the most famous explosions in the history of humankind, and there’s no doubt the director is very aware of the anticipation built around that moment in the film. Thanks to Göransson’s score and masterful editing by Jennifer Lame, the Trinity Test in the New Mexico desert arrives slowly, piece by piece, allowing the weight of the moment to settle over the actors and the audience like a shroud. Then, in an instant, it’s all ripped away in one of the most dazzling, sobering, instantly iconic sequences you’re likely to see at the movies this year."
 
Matthew Jackson, The Onion AV Club

"The Trinity test sequence also stands out because, for a few seconds during and after the explosion, the audience has an experience 'Oppenheimer' rarely provides us: silence. Whether it’s the Hans Zimmer-scored BRAHHHMMS of 'Inception' or the muddy sound mixes of 'Interstellar' and 'Tenet' -- movies whose dialogue audiences often found inaudible -- Nolan has long been a filmmaker who likes to experiment with layer on layer of overwhelming sound. 'Oppenheimer''s use of this tool can be both viscerally powerful, as in the scene just described, and suffocatingly oppressive. My viewing companion praised Ludwig Göransson’s unsettling violin-based score; to me, however appropriately anxiety-producing the music may have been, its omnipresence under virtually every line of dialogue felt invasive, as if I were watching a never-ending trailer. Nolan’s reliance on the score to goose the audience’s emotional involvement almost has an element of insecurity to it, as if he didn’t trust a story about the invention of the atom bomb to be upsetting enough on its own."
 
Dana Stevens, Slate.com 
 
"Soon we’re back in the exciting if tumultuous early days of his career, which take him across a great swath of 1920s Europe, where he hobnobs with field pioneers such as Niels Bohr (Kenneth Branagh) and befriends a fellow Jewish American physicist, Isidor Rabi (David Krumholtz), who foreshadows the rising tide of antisemitism worldwide. In one alarming episode from his time as a lost, wild-haired student at Cambridge, Oppenheimer reveals a capacity for irrational, intensely personal violence -- a darkness that is being either tempered or triggered by his stunning visions of the subatomic world. In these wondrously transporting images of juddering waves and swirling particles, accompanied by the rumbling, surging, keening strains of Ludwig Göransson’s magnificent score, Nolan makes a rare leap into realms of pure cinematic abstraction."
 
Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times

"The fleeting silence in such a massive, centerpiece of a scene is ironic and unexpected, especially considering Nolan’s appetite for bravura filmmaking and incessant and enormous sound, that’s often delivered with a side of a persistent musical score. (Here, the imposing and stupendous score that can occasionally afford to take a backseat belongs to the Oscar and Grammy-winning maestro, Ludwig Göransson.)"
 
Tomris Laffly, The Wrap 

"'Oppenheimer' is a movie so sprawling it’s difficult to contend with. It’s rich, uncompromising, and borderline unwieldy, but more than anything, it’s a tragedy of operatic grandeur despite so many of its scenes consisting of men talking in rooms -- conference rooms, Senate chambers, university classrooms, and emptied-out restaurants, all the prosaic places where the fate of the earth gets hashed out. Its scope comes from Murphy’s haunted performance and the way the movie (with help from Ludwig Göransson’s panic attack of a score) submerges you in the mind-set of its protagonist as though it can create a psychic connection to the past. Robert isn’t an easy character to understand; he’s arrogant, blunt, and aloof and possesses an intelligence about the unseen world of physics that makes him seem half-alien. But Nolan doesn’t want Robert to be relatable. He just wants to explore how his flawed humanity co-exists with his genius in what is ultimately a film about moral slippage and how someone who feels so certain of his own clear-eyed ideals finds himself standing in front of a screaming crowd celebrating the deaths of thousands of people in Japan."
 
Alison Willmore, New York 
 
"Mysteries of the self and the universe are conjoined in the film, whose early passages find Oppenheimer gazing upwards or out into the darkness amidst cutaways to twinkling stars, shining molecules, and paroxysmal flames. 'Oppenheimer' segues between intimate close-ups of Murphy’s lined, gaunt face and made-for-70mm-IMAX panoramas of cities, mountain ranges, and the cosmos until the two, like every other at-odds element in this drama, feel naturally wedded to one another. Shot with grandeur by cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema, the film is sensually overwhelming, its titanic visuals matched by Ludwig Göransson’s bellowing score of anxious ticking, thunderous foot-stomping, discordant buzzing, and strident 'Psycho'-esque strings. The last of these is remarkably apt, given that the proceedings are, in a certain sense, a nightmare about the corrosive legacy bequeathed by a parent to their (figurative) progeny."
 
Nick Schager, The Daily Beast

"Murphy’s performance is every bit as inspired as his casting. He plays Oppenheimer as more of an artist than a physicist -- as the rare man of science who God could mistake for a prophet -- and the opening passages of Nolan’s film twitch and fulminate in response to that creative temperament. That effect is most palpable in the way that Murphy appears to dance on the bow tip of Ludwig Göransson’s Zimmer-worthy score, which is all mercurial violins and spooky action at a distance before that delicate touch is replaced by the cacophonous layers of sound that every Nolan film relies upon when its parallel storylines converge in the third act."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire 
 
"Jennifer Lame's editing is prismatic and relentless, often in a faintly Terrence Malick-y way, skipping between three or more time periods within seconds. It's wedded to virtually nonstop music by Ludwig Göransson that fuses with the equally relentless dialogue and monologues to create an odd but distinctive sort of scientifically expository aria that's probably what it would feel like to read 'American Prometheus' while listening to a playlist of Philip Glass film scores. Non-linear movies like this one do a better job of capturing the pinball-machine motions of human consciousness than linear movies do, and they also capture what it's like to read a third-person omniscient book (or a biography that permits itself to imagine what its subjects might have been thinking or feeling). It also paradoxically captures the mental process of reading a text and responding to it emotionally and viscerally as well as intellectually. The mind stays anchored to the text. But it also jumps outside of it, connecting the text to other texts, to external knowledge, and to one's own experience and imaginings."
 
Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com

"The stakes are bigger here and more believable than anything Nolan has done before, a point he drives home with a few hardly nerve-soothing shots of the planet being immolated, eerie sound design and Ludwig Göransson’s grand, Hans Zimmer-like score."
 
Phil de Semlyen, Time Out 

"All of this proceeds with Nolan’s usual score-heavy propulsion that makes half the movie feel like a montage and three-quarters of it feel like a thriller; the clandestine elements of the Manhattan Project and the talk of Soviet spies give the movie a feeling of buttoned-up espionage."
 
Jesse Hassenger, Paste Magazine 
 
"Aiding immeasurably in Nolan’s unfaltering control of tone and tension is Jennifer Lame’s nimble editing and especially Ludwig Göransson’s extraordinarily forceful, almost wall-to-wall score. The music combines with the bone-shaking sound design to give the movie a febrile energy that won’t quit, mirroring the nervous inner life of its title character."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter 

PRAYERS FOR THE STOLEN - Jacobo Lieberman, Leonardo Heiblum
 
"Under the haunting strains of Jacobo Lieberman and Leonardo Heiblum’s elegant, restrained score, Dariela Ludlow’s unobtrusively lovely photography is key to the film’s universe-building, finding frames of breathtaking strangeness within these everyday lives. At night, the women dot a nearby hillside where the spotty cell reception is a bit better; their screens stipple the darkness eerily, turning their floating faces ghostly with reflected LCD light. By day, childish games of hide and seek are made gently chilling by foreshadowing moments in which a sheet looks like a shroud."
 
Jessica Kiang, Variety 
 
THE UNKNOWN COUNTRY - Alexis Marsh, Samuel Jones, Neil Halstead  
 
"The rich textures of the land and the people become intertwined, telling a story that looks closely at what other filmmakers might overlook. It does so with a light touch, never falling into the darkness too much, while also remembering that it is always there. As Lana stumbles upon a photo that leads to her going in search of where it was taken, the film settles into a rhythm that proves to be quite arresting. She still meets some new people, including a brief role from a charming Raymond Lee, though it increasingly strips away all the excess noise for something unexpectedly flooring in its final scenes. When accompanied by a spectacular score by Neil Halstead and the group DYAN, it draws you in even more completely."
 
Chase Hutchinson, Collider 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

August 11
BIG FISH (Danny Elfman) [BrainDead Studios]
CARRIE (Pino Donaggio) [Vidiots]
DEPECHE MODE 101 [Academy Museum]
HARVEST (Arthur Honegger) [UCLA/Hammer]
MON ONCLE (Alain Romans, Franck Barcellini) [Los Feliz 3]
PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE (Paul Williams, George Aliceson Tipton) [Nuart]
PUSS IN BOOTS: THE LAST WISH (Heitor Pereira) [Alamo Drafthouse]
RAN (Toru Takemitsu) [New Beverly]
RAW DEAL (Paul Sawtell), HE WALKED BY NIGHT (Leonid Raab) [Aero]
THE RED SHOES (Brian Easdale) [Vidiots]
RESERVOIR DOGS [New Beverly]
THE RING (Hans Zimmer) [New Beverly]
ROSEMARY'S BABY (Christopher Komeda) [Los Feliz 3]
SHREK 2 (Harry Gregson-Williams) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SIMON OF THE DESERT [BrainDead Studios]
TOKYO POP (Alan Brewer) [Los Feliz 3]

August 12
ATTACK THE BLOCK (Steven Price) [Vidiots]
BLUE VELVET (Angelo Badalamenti) [Los Feliz 3]
FALLING DOWN (James Newton Howard) [Los Feliz 3]
FIGHT CLUB (Dust Brothers) [Landmark Westwood]
THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (Heinz Roemheld), MOONRISE (William Lava) [Aero] 
LIONS LOVE (...AND LIES) (Joseph Byrd) [Los Feliz 3]
MALEFICENT (James Newton Howard) [Academy Museum]
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (John Phillips)
OUR DAILY BREAD, UNDER THE FIG TREES (Amin Bouhafa) [UCLA/Hammer]
RAN (Toru Takemitsu) [New Beverly]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
SONGS FOR DRELLA (John Cale, Lou Reed), HOME OF THE BRAVE (Laurie Anderson) [Academy Museum]
SPIRIT: STALLION OF THE CIMARRON (Hans Zimmer) [Vidiots]
THE SPIRITUALIST (Alexander Laszlo) [Aero]
A TALE OF SPRINGTIME [Los Feliz 3]
TOY STORY 3 (Randy Newman) [New Beverly]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Mark Levinthal) [Alamo Drafthouse]
A VIEW TO A KILL (John Barry) [Vidiots]

August 13
BLUE VELVET (Angelo Badalamenti) [Los Feliz 3]
BODYGUARD (Paul Sawtell) [Aero]
CITIZEN KANE (Bernard Herrmann) [BrainDead Studios]
FIRST BLOOD (Jerry Goldsmith) [Vidiots]
FREAKY FRIDAY (Rolfe Kent) [Vidiots]
GETTYSBURG (Randy Edelman) [Fine Arts]
HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (John Williams, William Ross) [Alamo Drafthouse]
LA DOLCE VITA (Nino Rota) [Vidiots]
MEDICINE FOR MELANCHOLY (Mondo Boys), THE DIARY OF A TEENAGE GIRL (Nate Heller) [UCLA/Hammer]
NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES (Victor Young), THE BIG CLOCK (Victor Young) [Aero]
PALE FLOWER (Toru Takemitsu) [Los Feliz 3]
RAN (Toru Takemitsu) [New Beverly]
SHREK 2 (Harry Gregson-Williams) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
TOKYO CHORUS [Academy Museum]
TOKYO POP (Alan Brewer) [Los Feliz 3]
TOY STORY 3 (Randy Newman) [New Beverly] 
TRON: LEGACY (Daft Punk) [Academy Museum]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Mark Levinthal) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE WIND OF AYAHUASCA [Los Feliz 3] 

August 14
KNOCK OFF (Ron Mael, Russell Mael), DOUBLE TEAM (Gary Chang) [New Beverly]
MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA [BrainDead Studios]
PARIS, TEXAS (Ry Cooder) [Vidiots]
PUFNSTUF (Charles Fox) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TEEN WITCH (Richard Elliot) [Los Feliz 3]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Mark Levinthal) [Alamo Drafthouse]  

August 15
THE COLOR OF POMEGRANATES (Tigran Mansuryan) [Vidiots]
EMPIRE OF THE SUN (John Williams) [Academy Museum]
FACELESS (Romano Musumarra) [Alamo Drafthouse]
GRAND ILLUSION (Joseph Kosma), TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI (Jean Wiener) [New Beverly]
HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (John Williams, William Ross) [Alamo Drafthouse]
HYENAS (Wasis Diop) [Los Feliz 3]
SHIVA BABY (Ariel Marx) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR (Dave Grusin) [Aero]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Mark Levinthal) [Alamo Drafthouse]  

August 16
ALICE IN THE CITIES (Can) [BrainDead Studios]
GRAND ILLUSION (Joseph Kosma) ,TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI (Jean Wiener) [New Beverly]
HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (John Williams, William Ross) [Alamo Drafthouse]
IDENTIKIT (Franco Mannino) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE THING (Ennio Morricone) [Vidiots]

August 17
THE HUNGER (Michel Rubini, Denny Jaeger), HOUSE OF DARK SHADOWS (Bob Cobert)
NIGHTS OF CABIRIA (Nino Rota) [New Beverly]
NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (Carter Burwell), ALL THE PRETTY HORSES (Larry Paxton, Marty Stuart, Kristin Wilkinson) [Aero]
RAGING BULL [Alamo Drafthouse]
RAISING ARIZONA (Carter Burwell) [Vidiots]
TOKYO POP (Alan Brewer) [Los Feliz 3]

August 18
CAPE FEAR (Bernard Herrmann, Elmer Bernstein) [New Beverly]
THE COUNSELOR (Daniel Pemberton) [Los Feliz 3]
DAZED AND CONFUSED [Los Feliz 3]
NIGHTS OF CABIRIA (Nino Rota) [New Beverly]
THE OUTSIDERS (Carmine Coppola) [Vidiots]
RESERVOIR DOGS [New Beverly]
SHIVA BABY (Ariel Marx) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TWIN PEAKS FIRE WALK WITH ME (Angelo Badalamenti) [BrainDead Studios]
WE SOLD OUR SOULS TO ROCK N ROLL [Academy Museum]
WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]

August 19
ALL I WANNA DO (Graeme Revell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON (Elmer Bernstein) [Vidiots]
BROTHER (Joe Hisaishi) [Los Feliz 3]
CRIA CUERVOS [Los Feliz 3]
DAVID BYRNE'S AMERICAN UTOPIA (David Byrne) [Academy Museum]
ENCANTO (Germaine Franco) [Academy Museum]
EVIL DEAD 2 (Joseph LoDuca), SUPERSTITION (David Gibney), TRICK OR TREAT (Christopher Young) [New Beverly]
THE FUGITIVE (James Newton Howard) [Aero]
JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH (Randy Newman) [Vidiots]
NO ORDINARY MAN, CHAVELA (Gil Talmi) [UCLA/Hammer]
PAPRIKA (Susumu Hirasawa) [Landmark Westwood]
RAISING ARIZONA (Carter Burwell) [Vidiots] 
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart] 
SHIVA BABY (Ariel Marx) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THREE O'CLOCK HIGH (Tangerine Dream, Sylvester Levay) [New Beverly]

August 20
ARIZONA DREAM (Goran Bregovic) [BrainDead Studios]
DAZED AND CONFUSED [Los Feliz 3]
DROP DEAD GORGEOUS (Mark Mothersbaugh) [Alamo Drafthouse]
EVIL DEAD 2 (Joseph LoDuca), SUPERSTITION (David Gibney), TRICK OR TREAT (Christopher Young) [New Beverly] 
HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN (John Williams) [Alamo Drafthouse]
HOOK (John Williams) [Vidiots]
MAD MAX: FURY ROAD (Tom Holkenborg) [Vidiots]
PARK ROW (Paul Dunlap) [Los Feliz 3]
PREY (Sarah Scachner), PREDATOR (Alan Silvestri) [Aero]
THE RACKET [Academy Museum]
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY (Michael Giacchino) [Academy Museum]
SAY ANYTHING (Richard Gibbs, Anne Dudley) [Vidiots]
SOUTHERN COMFORT (Joel Harrison), VERA (Arrigo Barnabe) [UCLA/Hammer]
A TALE OF SUMMER [Los Feliz 3]
THREE O'CLOCK HIGH (Tangerine Dream, Sylvester Levay) [New Beverly] 
WISE BLOOD (Alex North) [BrainDead Studios]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
Destination Moon (Stevens); Tutte le donne della mia vita (Morricone); Monstrous Movie Music (various); Un giorno perfetto (Guerra); Kronos (Sawtell/Shefter); The Space Children/The Colossus of New York (Van Cleave); Vincere (Crivelli); Where the Wild Things Are (Burwell/Karen O.); An American in Paris (Gershwin/Green/Chaplin); Gigi (Loewe/Previn); The Pink Panther (Mancini); What's New Pussycat? (Bacharach)

Read: Some Lie and Some Die, by Ruth Rendell

Seen: The Third Man; It Always Rains on Sunday; Dreamin' Wild; The Miracle Club; The Cure in Orange; Shortcomings; Flesh and the Devil; Beauty and the Beast [1991]; Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutant Mayhem; Talk to Me [2023]; Passages

Watched: Legion ("Chapter Two"); 30 Rock ("The Problem Solvers"); Masters of Sex ("One for the Money, Two for the Show"); Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt ("Kimmy Meets a Celebrity!"); The Newsroom ("Bullies"); Veep ("Helsinki")

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