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The latest release from Intrada is an expanded, two-disc edition to the score for director Philip Kaufman's hit 1978 remake of the sci-fi/horror classic INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS, the only feature film scored by Denny Zeitlin. Disc One features the complete score plus alternates; Disc Two features the original soundtrack sequencing from the film's first release.


The latest releases from Quartet are Ennio Morricone's score for the 1974 French thriller LE SECRET; Riz Ortolani's score for the 1978 "mondo" documentary BRUTES AND SAVAGES; and the score for the 1979 sci-fi/horror film STRIDULUM (aka The Visitor), composed by Franco Micalizzi.


The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences has announced their nominations for this year's Primetime Emmy Awards, including the following music-related categories: 

OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
HOCUS POCUS 2 - John Debney 
MS. MARVEL: Time And Again - Laura Karpman
PREY - Sarah Schachner
A SMALL LIGHT: What Can Be Saved - Ariel Marx 
WEIRD: THE AL YANKOVIC STORY - Leo Birenberg, Zach Robinson 
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A SERIES (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
ANDOR: Rix Road - Nicholas Britell 
THE LAST OF US: Long, Long Time - Gustavo Santaolalla
SUCCESSION: Connor’s Wedding - Nicholas Britell
WEDNESDAY: Woe Is The Loneliest Number - Danny Elfman, Chris Bacon 
THE WHITE LOTUS: In The Sandbox - Cristobal Tapia de Veer 
 
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
 
ANDOR - Nicholas Britell 
GUILLERMO DEL TORO’S CABINET OF CURIOSITIES - Holly Amber Church 
MS. MARVEL - Laura Karpman
WEDNESDAY - Danny Elfman 
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A DOCUMENTARY SERIES OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
EVA LONGORIA: SEARCHING FOR MEXICO : Veracruz -Tony Morales 
LIGHT & MAGIC: Gang Of Outsiders - James Newton Howard 
PAMELA, A LOVE STORY - Blake Neely 
PREHISTORIC PLANET: Badlands - Hans Zimmer, An┼że Rozman, Kara Talve 
STILL: A MICHAEL J. FOX MOVIE - John Powell 
 
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MUSIC AND LYRICS
 
GINNY & GEORGIA: Hark! Darkness Descends! – “Marriage Is A Dungeon” - Music & Lyrics by Lili Haydn, Ben Bromfield 
THE L WORD: GENERATION Q: Questions For The Universe - “All About Me” - Music & Lyrics by Heather McIntosh, Taura Stinson, Allyson Newman 
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL: Susan – “Your Personal Trash Man Can” - Music & Lyrics by Curtis Moore, Thomas Mizer 
TED LASSO: Mom City – “Fought & Lost” - Music & Lyrics by Tom Howe, Jamie Hartman, Sam Ryder
TED LASSO: So Long, Farewell - “A Beautiful Game” - Music & Lyrics by Ed Sheeran, Foy Vance, Max Martin
WEIRD: THE AL YANKOVIC STORY – “Now You Know” - Music & Lyrics by Al Yankovic
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC DIRECTION
 
THE APPLE MUSIC SUPER BOWL LVII HALFTIME SHOW STARRING RIHANNA - Adam Blackstone, Omar Edwards 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GERSHWIN PRIZE FOR POPULAR SONG: JONI MITCHELL - Greg Phillinganes 
THE OSCARS - Rickey Minor 
2022 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION CEREMONY - Adam Blackstone 
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE: Host: Austin Butler - Lenny Pickett, Leon Pendarvis, Eli Brueggemann
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
 
DAISY JONES & THE SIX: Track 8: Looks Like We Made It - Frankie Pine 
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL: Four Minutes - Robin Urdang 
STRANGER THINGS: Chapter Nine: The Piggyback - Nora Felder 
TED LASSO: So Long, Farewell - Tony Von Pervieux, Christa Miller 
THE WHITE LOTUS: Bull Elephants - Gabe Hilfer 

CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Bloody Fury
 - Susan Dibona, Salvatore Sangiovanni - Kronos  
The Escape Artist
 - Georges Delerue - Silva 
The Golden Age of Science Fiction Vol. 2
 - Paul Dunlap, Gerald Fried, Walter Greene - Dragon's Domain 
Hammett
 - John Barry - Silva 
Invasion of the Body Snatchers - Denny Zeitlin - Intrada Special Collection
The Lee Holdridge Collection Vol. 3
 - Lee Holdridge - Dragon's Domain 
The Wonders of the Universe (The Music from the Big Finish Space: 1999 Audio Dramas)
 - Joe Kraemer - Buysoundtrax  


IN THEATERS TODAY

Barbie - Mark Ronson, Andrew Wyatt - Song CD on Atlantic
The Beanie Bubble - Nathan Barr, Damian Kulash
Cobweb - Drum & Lace
Happiness for Beginners - Sherri Chung
Lakota Nation vs. United States - Raven Chacon 
Mother, May I? - Mark Riordan
Oppenheimer - Ludwig Goransson
20 Days in Mariupol - Jordan Dykstra 


COMING SOON

July 28
Mission: Impossible - Dead Reckoning Part One - Lorne Balfe - La-La Land
The Super Mario Bros. Movie - Brian Tyler - iam8bit  
August 11
Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny - John Williams - Disney
December 1
Scream VI - Brian Tyler, Sven Faulconer - Varese Sarabande
Date Unknown

Brutes and Savages - Riz Ortolani - Quartet
The David Michael Frank Collection Vol. 2: Cinematic Noir
 - David Michael Frank - Dragon's Domain
Excessive Force II: Force on Force
 - Kevin Kiner - Dragons' Domain [CD-R]

Gli Italiani e l'industria
- Piero Umiliani - Kronos 
Il sole buio/L'angelo con la pistola
- Riz Ortolani - Beat 
Le Secret - Ennio Morricone - Quartet
Phar Lap
 - Bruce Rowland - Buysoundtrax
Stridulum (The Visitor)
- Franco Micalizzi - Quartet
Un sacco bello
- Ennio Morricone - Beat


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

July 21 - Jerry Goldsmith died (2004)
July 22 - George Dreyfus born (1928)
July 22 - Richard Hill born (1942)
July 22 - Alan Menken born (1949)
July 22 - Nigel Hess born (1953)
July 22 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Warning Shot (1966)
July 22 - Lalo Schifrin records his score for Mission: Impossible’s third season premiere, “The Heir Apparent” (1968)
July 22 - John Barry begins recording the orchestral score to King Kong (1976)
July 22 - Alan Silvestri begins recording his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Go to the Head of the Class" (1986)
July 23 - George Greeley born (1917)
July 23 - Bill Lee born (1928)
July 23 - L. Subramaniam born (1947)
July 23 - Nicholas Hooper born (1952)
July 23 - Recording sessions begin for Hugo Friedhofer’s score to The Blue Angel (1959)
July 23 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Rio Conchos (1964)
July 23 - Leith Stevens died (1970)
July 23 - Georges Auric died (1983)
July 23 - John Addison records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "The Greible" (1986)
July 23 - Hans J. Salter died (1994)
July 23 - Piero Piccioni died (2004)
July 24 - Robert Farnon born (1917)
July 24 - Wilfred Josephs born (1927)
July 24 - Marcello Giombini born (1928)
July 24 - Les Reed born (1935)
July 24 - High Noon opens in New York (1952)
July 24 - Alan Rawsthorne died (1971)
July 24 - Leo Shuken died (1976)
July 24 - Norman Dello Joio died (2008)
July 25 - Don Ellis born (1934)
July 25 - Denis King born (1939)
July 25 - Thurston Moore born (1958)
July 25 - Henry Mancini begins recording his score for Days of Wine and Roses (1962)
July 25 - Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never born (1982)
July 25 - Bruce Broughton records his unused adaptations of Bach for The Accidental Tourist (1988)
July 25 - Patrick Williams died (2018)
July 26 - Tadeusz Baird born (1928)
July 26 - Bronislau Kaper and Scott Bradley begin recording their score for Courage of Lassie (1945)
July 26 - David Raksin begins recording his score for Too Late Blues (1961)
July 26 - Irving Gertz’s score for The Invaders episode “The Enemy” is recorded (1967)
July 26 - Sidney Cutner’s score for The Invaders episode “The Watchers” is recorded (1967)
July 26 - Robert Drasnin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “The Mercenaries” (1968)
July 26 - Joseph Bishara born (1970)
July 26 - Robert Drasnin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Run for the Money” (1971)
July 26 - Buddy Baker died (2002)
July 27 - Marc Wilkinson born (1929)
July 27 - Bernard Herrmann records the Piano Concerto for the Hangover Square score (1944)
July 27 - Michael Linn born (1952)
July 27 - Stefan Nilsson born (1955)
July 27 - Alex North begins recording his score to The Outrage (1964)
July 27 - Max Steiner begins recording his score for Those Calloways (1964)
July 27 - Harry Lubin died (1977)
July 27 - Georges Delerue records his score for Exposed (1982)
July 27 - Jerome Moross died (1983)
July 27 - Miklos Rozsa died (1995)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

ANCHORAGE - Savannah Wheeler
 
"Effectively accentuated by a score from Savannah Wheeler that’s laced with fittingly discordant, piercing strings, the soundtrack could have done without extra embellishments, like a folksy rendition of 'America the Beautiful,' to get its point across."
 
Michael Rechtshaffen, Los Angeles Times 

THE BLAZING WORLD - Isom Innis
 
"For a first-time film on an indie budget, Young and her team offer something truly impressive. Margaret makes her way through all manner of locations, from a retrofitted family mansion (in the Kier-dimension, it’s filled to bursting with flowers both living and dead) to a desert shack that holds a literal key to her future. Backed by Isom Innis’ lustrous and foreboding score, the film’s imagination and production design is an eye-popping showcase for a rising director who clearly knows her aesthetic and how to push it to crazy ends. It’s an imperfect debut, but it holds thrilling promise for what comes next."
 
Kate Erbland, IndieWire 

"However Young, who co-wrote the script with Pierce Brown, fails to build past this basic concept and instead fills the time with shots that seem self-indulgent. There are some moments when the camera lingers on her as she’s crying, fighting, or throwing a tantrum that begin to feel a little silly the longer the shots run. Their purpose is to give her time to shine, but Young’s performance does not rise to the occasion. Kier gives a quirky Goblin King-like performance as Lained, but even that’s not enough to redeem the movie. Cheap CGI effects and strange flashes to monsters and random close-ups weaken the movie even further. Shane F. Kelly’s neon-infused cinematography and Rodney Becker’s production design can’t distract from the on-screen cacophony, which includes the sounds of Young’s music producer and musician husband, Isom Innis."   
 
Monica Castillo, RogerEbert.com
 
"There are pleasures to be taken from the resourceful staging of this journey by Young, DP Shane F. Kelly and production designer Rodney F. Becker, who all meet on the same wavelength of baroque but homespun kitsch. Isom Innis’ loudly assertive, orchestral-to-electric score, meanwhile, dictates emotion wherever the writing blanks out -- not for nothing do the credits sandwich Innis between direction and screenplay. (Chintzy digital effects, on the other hand, don’t quite pull their weight.)"
 
Guy Lodge, Variety  
 
THE BOOGEYMAN - Patrick Jonsson
 
"Familiarity doesn’t always preclude craftsmanship, and when 'The Boogeyman' is in haunted-house mode, Savage and cinematographer Eli Born work the framing, the light sources and the shadows with admirable care and patience, even if the loudly scored jump shocks are perhaps one too many. But as soon as it segues to monster movie — screenwriting team Beck and Woods are the 'A Quiet Place' guys -- a woeful metaphoric derivativeness takes over as swiftly as icky black tendrils spread across the Harpers’ walls and ceiling."
 
Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times 

GOLDEN VOICES - Asher Goldschmidt
 
"Berkovich’s Cinemascope lensing intimately frames the protagonists in their drab new environment while the art direction by Sandra Gutman captures all that is seedy, ugly and decaying about it, from their apartment, to the black-market video store and Raya’s no-frills call center. The aptly used score by Asher Goldschmidt alternates with pre-existing melancholy Russian songs."
 
Alissa Simon, Variety

HOW TO BLOW UP A PIPELINE - Gavin Brivik
 
"Elsewhere, costume designer Eunice Jera Lee’s work deserves a special shoutout in amplifying these personalities as scrappy and resourceful activists, all with their own distinctiveness and sense of self. Indeed, the portrayal of activists can go off the rails easily with overdone, hippy-ish styling choices. Through Lee’s keen eye we immediately buy these passionate fighters as plausible, flesh-and-blood contemporary people. Rounding off the film’s impressive crafts is Daniel Garber’s zippy and crystal-clear editing, as well as Gavin Brivik’s pulsating electronic score, dangerous and intimate in equal parts."
 
Tomris Laffly, The Wrap 

"An ensemble drama too diluted to meaningfully establish any characters, 'How to Blow Up a Pipeline' relies on tension-building music and chaotic flashbacks to piece together its one-trick heist narrative. Using the book as philosophical inspiration, this Gen Z eco-thriller tries to speak to young audiences plagued by climate anxiety, but it lacks the style or ingenuity to translate. As the action continues, the stakes remain at a steady hum. The tension of the beginning never really ratchets up, no matter how many times the same dramatic music plays. A minor snag is quickly resolved, with Michael muttering, 'Your wire doesn’t f*cking reach, Sean,' two seconds before apparently using it anyway and telling him, 'Good job with the wires.'Stylistically, the movie is all over the map, with no cohesive visual language or point of view. There’s one faux-artsy shot of Xochi bathed in blue light smoking a cigarette, but even this clichéd motif never returns again."
 
Jude Dry, IndieWire 

"Goldhaber has built an incredibly effective tension machine with 'How to Blow Up a Pipeline,' which was shot on warm, grainy 16mm and boasts a galvanizing electronic score by Gavin Brivik. As the group’s plan speeds past the point of no return, the film effectively melds its intimate style into the clichés of a large-scale action movie, as in the moment where two pipeline workers show up at precisely the wrong moment or in a late twist that throws one of the character’s motivations into question. There’s even a bit of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 'The Wages of Fear -- and, by extension, William Friedkin’s 'Sorcerer' -- in two unbearably anxiety-inducing sequences of the crew carefully moving their D.I.Y. bomb to its blast location."
 
Mark Hanson, Slant Magazine 
 
"It’s so evenly handled that it’s impossible to praise one star without the others; Barer’s unwavering gaze supplements Scribner’s weight-shifting unease, which allows Froseth and Gage’s comic relief to crack us up and Goodluck’s endearing glower to bring us back down. Meanwhile, Lane and Lawson’s disarmingly raw intimacy supplements Weary’s distance -- it’s finely tuned character work, with everyone rising to the occasion. The filmmaking throws back to the pacing and style of ‘70s thrillers (accordingly scored by Gavin Brivik’s too-cool synth riffs), but its excellent cast radiates as much charm as 'Ocean’s Eleven' and as much danger as 'The Dirty Dozen.'"
 
Jacob Oller, Paste Magazine 

"In 'How to Blow Up a Pipeline,' a diverse young cast, including 'American Honey' star Sasha Lane, Lukas Gage ('Euphoria'), Forrest Goodluck, Jayme Lawson (the mayor in 'The Batman') and 'black-ish''s Marcus Scribner, play a group of ideologically-driven eco-activists -- or, if you’re on the other side of the trenches, ‘eco-terrorists’-- who, inspired by Malm’s book (because meta is better) set off for a Texas oil refinery to turn theory into praxis. Along the way, flashbacks sketch in the backstory of each of the characters, and it’s a testimony to Goldhaber’s skill -- and composer Gavin Brivik’s propulsive score -- that the cut-up chronology doesn’t let the air out of the film’s narrative tyres."
 
David Hughes, Time Out 
 
"Directed and co-written by Daniel Goldhaber in collaboration with Jordan Sjol and Ariela Barer, 'How to Blow Up a Pipeline' adapts and reimagines a same-titled non-fiction book by Andreas Malm, which argues, among other things, that climate change is a rapidly accelerating threat to human life; that pacifist protests that try to appeal to the moral conscience of giant energy companies and their government proxies are doomed to failure and have done nothing to slow the disaster; and that targeted sabotage that is aimed at property and is careful to avoid hurting people is a justified next step. The film's tone, pacing, and construction evoke classic thrillers from the '70s and '80s, from the dynamic but never showy camerawork and crisp, short, flowing scenes to the retro-synth score (by Gavin Brivik) that burbles beneath even expository moments, to the way the opening plunges audiences right into action, then judiciously flashes back to fill in everyone's backstories and show the different reasons why each of them is drawn to such extreme action."
 
Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com 
 
"'How To Blow Up A Pipeline' starts like a heist movie. Set to rhythmic music, a team of activists in West Texas separately go about their tasks, then gather together. Slowly and deliberately, each character and what they do is revealed. There’s an emphasis on work and preparation. Each character is moving, doing something, or taking care of someone. Obviously, they are getting together to perform the act that’s in the movie’s title. The 'why' is held back for the time being. Propulsive and with a hint of mystery, these early scenes set the film up like a thriller."
 
Murtada Elfadl, The Onion AV Club 
 
INTRUSION - Alex Heffes
 
"It’s here that the film’s construction begins to feel half-baked, compared to what came before. In earlier scenes, where the focus is squarely on Meera’s doubts and silent realizations, the camera weaves and tilts as it moves through space or pushes in on her, magnifying her lingering sensations in the process. However, once the film takes on a mystery bent, its focus on physical details is awkward, misplaced, and worst of all, noncommittal. The camera stands mostly still as Meera reacts to addresses, logos, and other bits of information that appear to mean something to her, but few of these things are ever established for the audience, and so their meaning remains vague for unbearably lengthy stretches of time, especially as the plot begins to displace most of the character drama. Pinto is even shot in profile for at least one of these sequences, which really doesn’t help unearth what’s meant to be happening (emotionally or logistically). Were it not for the film’s suitably jagged and propulsive music by Alex Heffes, which hints at how all this information might eventually fall into place, such scenes of discovery would be entirely perfunctory."
 
Siddhant Adlakhsa, IndieWire 

KNOCKING - Martin Dirkov

"In addition to its mind-bending narrative, the visual style of 'Knocking' is equally as striking. Cinematographer Hannes Krantz luxuriates his images in burnt reds, velvety greens, and golden sunset yellows, darkening the movie’s color palette without taking away its vibrancy. Both pale fluorescent lights and sunlight seeping in through tan curtains cast a pall over Molly, as if she can never escape from clouds looming overhead. A number of camera angles and movements feel especially unsettling, not just in an off-axis tilted angle kind of way, but like when the camera pans over Molly’s head in a way that resembles the motion of a brain scan, as if the audience was sharing her out-of-body experience. Or there's the dizzying close-ups of a frantic Molly with what looks like a GoPro, which enhance what feels like a claustrophobic episode, the outside world blurring around Molly, leaving her more dazed and uneasy as ever. Martin Dirkov’s haunting score accompanies Molly’s journey, amplifying its eerie tones as her behavior becomes erratic."
 
Monica Castillo, RogerEbert.com 

"At least Kempff’s visual storytelling is all in order, making for an auspicious formal calling card. Hannes Krantz’s humid, gravy-toned cinematography and Elle Furudahl’s cramped, faintly rotting production design work in close conjunction to keep us in Molly’s anxious headspace, rather than coolly outside of it. (That said, increasing use of a Snorricam-like setup to convey her disorientation, echoing the chaotic final reels of 'Requiem for a Dream,' might be a gimmick too far.) Thomas Jaeger’s sound design, meanwhile, cleverly makes the knocking such a fixed aural motif -- layered through a score and soundscape so rife with other buzzes, screeches, whines and percussive rattles of uncertain origin -- that we’re sometimes uncertain if we’re actually hearing it or not. That’s some nifty cinematic gaslighting right there."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety 
 
"As you’d hope in a movie called Knocking, the sound design (by Thomas Jæger) is superb, accentuating the story’s chills and emotions without overpowering them. In a hospital intake room, the sound of an unseen interviewer’s typing after each question and answer is bloodcurdling, and the use of silence at key moments builds a portentous feeling of suspended animation. Martin Dirkov’s understated score is slithery and insinuating, but it’s also infused with an aching sadness. This is, at its core, a story of grief."
 
Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter 
 
MENDING THE LINE - Bill Brown
 
"The fly-fishing sequences are beautiful, and the Montana scenery is stunning. Bill Brown's score is of the old-fashioned sweeping kind, and its use is heavy-handed, insisting on the scene's emotion as opposed to supporting it. Watching Colter standing in the river, a big smile on his face when he casts out his line correctly, carries its own weight without orchestral underlining. Each character gets a lengthy monologue, where they tell their story and sum up their emotions. The cranky old-coot humor between Studi and Cox is a welcome break, and there could have been more of it. Ike, Colter, and Lucy are complex people struggling with entrenched problems which can't be wished away. They do their best to survive and sometimes fail to rise above. This dynamic saves the film from sentimentality and some of its blunter tendencies towards self-conscious 'inspiration.' Life is hard. You never heal completely. You just find ways to cope."
 
Sheila O'Malley, RogerEbert.com 

NOBODY'S HERO - Xavier Boussiron
 
"Like most of his films, the technical elements, including gritty, naturalistic cinematography by Hélène Louvart ('The Lost Daughter') and low-key music by Xavier Boussiron (who worked on Guiraudie’s 'The King of Escape'), are strong, underscoring an urban setting that’s at once mundane and constantly tense. The original French title, which is also the title of a song by late pop singer France Gall, translates to: 'Come, I’ll take you there.'"
 
Jordan Mintzer, The Hollywood Reporter 

SHOOTING STARS - Mark Isham
 
"Robinson's direction, Karsten Gopinath's cinematography, Jo Francis's editing, and Mark Isham's score work harmoniously to put across the text and subtext of each moment, large or small, while also infusing them with additional layers of meaning. Playful drone shots zoom along behind a bicyclist; zip through an open window and follow an actor through a small apartment; and (incredibly) follow the ball through a hoop after a dunk. These moments are a visual corollary for that elating feeling you get when your mind, body and spirit are are so attuned that you feel as if physics can't restrain you. Even spectacular compositions have meaning and purpose. An overhead shot of the Catholic school team and its Black players doing pre-practice stretches on a gym floor emblazoned with huge cartoon leprechauns sums up the heroes' cultural context better than dialogue could."
 
Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

July 21
APOCALYPSE NOW (Carmine Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola) [Aero]
AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY (George S. Clinton), CHARLIE'S ANGELS (Edward Shearmur) [New Beverly]
DODSWORTH (Alfred Newman) [Los Feliz 3]
THE HATEFUL EIGHT (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly]
KWAIDAN (Toru Takemitsu) [BrainDead Studios]
LA BAMBA (Miles Goodman) [Vidiots]
MIDSOMMAR (Bobby Krlic) [Nuart]
A NEW LEAF [Vidiots]
PITCH BLACK (Graeme Revell) [New Beverly]
SOUL POWER [Academy Museum]
TAXI ZUM KLO (Hans Wittstatt) [Los Feliz 3]
TIMES SQUARE [Los Feliz 3]
WHIPLASH (Justin Hurwitz) [BrainDead Studios]

July 22
AQUAMARINE (David Hirschfelder) [New Beverly]
AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY (George S. Clinton), CHARLIE'S ANGELS (Edward Shearmur) [New Beverly]
BABYLON (Justin Hurwitz) [Aero]
CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (Ernst Reijseger) [BrainDead Studios]
CRUMB (David Boeddinghaus) [Vidiots] 
HOOK (John Williams) [New Beverly]
ISLE OF DOGS (Alexandre Desplat) [Landmark Westwood]
ONCE UPON A TIME...IN HOLLYWOOD [Aero]
PADDINGTON (Nick Urata) [Vidiots]
RATATOUILLE (Michael Giacchino) [Academy Museum]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME [Academy Museum]
A SUMMER PLACE (Max Steiner) [Los Feliz 3]
SUNSET BLVD. (Franz Waxman) [Vidiots]
TIMES SQUARE [Los Feliz 3] 
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Mark Levinthal) [Los Feliz 3]
THE VIRGIN OF PESSAC '68, THE VIRGIN OF PESSAC '79 [Los Feliz 3]

July 23
AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY (George S. Clinton), CHARLIE'S ANGELS (Edward Shearmur) [New Beverly]
EARTH (live score by Luke Corradine) [Academy Museum]
HOOK (John Williams) [New Beverly]
IN A LONELY PLACE (George Antheil) [Los Feliz 3]
THE MUSIC LOVERS (Andre Previn) [Los Feliz 3]
NOPE (Michael Abels) [Aero]
RETURN TO OZ (David Shire) [Academy Museum]
YEAR OF THE DRAGON (David Mansfield) [Aero] 

July 24
BEVERLY HILLS COP (Harold Faltermeyer) [Vidiots]
THE CAR (Leonard Rosenman) [Los Feliz 3]
DON'T TELL MOM THE BABYSITTER'S DEAD (David Newman) [Vidiots]
GOOSEBUMPS 2: HAUNTED HALLOWEEN (Dominic Lewis) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SLAUGHTER (Luchi De Jesus), I ESCAPED FROM DEVIL'S ISLAND (Les Baxter), CRACK HOUSE (Michael Piccirillo) [New Beverly]
WARLORDS OF ATLANTIS [Los Feliz 3]

July 25
BREATHLESS (Martial Solal) [Vidiots]
DAYBREAKERS (Christopher Gordon) [Alamo Drafthouse]
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (Ennio Morricone), FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly]
LEGEND (Tangerine Dream) [Academy Museum]
9 TO 5 (Charles Fox) [Vidiots]
RAMROD (Adolph Deutsch), PITFALL [UCLA]

July 26
DAYBREAKERS (Christopher Gordon) [Alamo Drafthouse]
A DIRTY STORY [Los Feliz 3]
THE FACE OF ANOTHER (Toru Takemitsu) [Los Feliz 3]
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (Ennio Morricone), FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly] 
THE IRON GIANT (Michael Kamen) [Vidiots]
THE WATERMELON WOMAN (Paul Shapiro) [BrainDead Studios]

July 27
THE EXORCIST [Academy Museum]
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (Ennio Morricone), FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly] 
HEAT (Elliot Goldenthal) [Vidiots]
LICORICE PIZZA (Jonny Greenwood) [Aero]
PRISIONEROS DE LA TIERRA (Lucio Demare) [Los Feliz 3] 

July 28
ALIEN (Jerry Goldsmith) [Vidiots]
APOCALYPSE NOW (Carmine Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola) [Aero]
CONTEMPT (Georges Delerue) [Los Feliz 3]
THE FACE OF ANOTHER (Toru Takemitsu) [Los Feliz 3]
THE HATEFUL EIGHT (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly]
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 2 (Mark Mothersbaugh) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE LAST WALTZ [Academy Museum]
LISZTOMANIA (Rick Wakeman) [BrainDead Studios]
MADONNA: TRUTH OR DARE [BrainDead Studios]
THE ROOM (Mladen Milicevic) [Landmark Westwood]
SEIZURE (Lee Gagnon) [Los Feliz 3]
STARSHIP TROOPERS (Basil Poledoris) [New Beverly]
SUSPIRIA (Goblin) [Vidiots]
TRASH HUMPERS, BOARDINGHOUSE (33 and 1/3) [New Beverly]

July 29
APOCALYPSE NOW (Carmine Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola) [Aero]
THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (Tony Cora) [New Beverly]
THE COMPANY (Van Dyke Parks) [BrainDead Studios]
DAZED AND CONFUSED [Vidiots]
EASY A (Brad Segal) [Alamo Drafthouse]
FINDING NEMO (Thomas Newman) [Academy Museum]
THE KILLERS (Miklos Rozsa) [Aero]
LE COCHON [Los Feliz 3]
LILO & STITCH (Alan Silvestri) [New Beverly]
MONSTER ON THE CAMPUS [Los Feliz 3]
A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON [Academy Museum]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart] 
STEVIE (Dirk Powell) [Los Feliz 3]
THIRTEEN (Mark Mothersbaugh) [Los Feliz 3]
TOMMY (Pete Townsend) [Nuart]
TRASH HUMPERS, BOARDINGHOUSE (33 and 1/3) [New Beverly]

July 30
AMADEUS [BrainDead Studios]
CINEMA PARADISO (Ennio Morricone) [Aero]
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (Tan Dun) [Vidiots]
FANCHON THE CRICKET, ROSITA [Academy Museum]
I SAW THE DEVIL (Mowg) [Alamo Drafthouse]
LILO & STITCH (Alan Silvestri) [New Beverly]
MALCOLM X (Terence Blanchard) [Aero]
MATLIDA (David Newman) [Vidiots]
SUNDAY BLOODY SUNDAY (Ron Geesin) [Los Feliz 3]
SUPERBAD (Lyle Workman) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE TASTE OF TEA [BrainDead Studios]
TRASH HUMPERS, BOARDINGHOUSE (33 and 1/3) [New Beverly]
WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (Alan Silvestri) [Academy Museum]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
L'ultimo bacio (Buonvino); Magnifica Presenza (Catalano); Malena (Morricone); Music from the Films of Yasujiro Ozu (various); Mine vaganti (Catalano)

Read: Smoky Valley, by Donald Hamilton

Seen: "Amazing Tales from the Archives"; Thirty Day Princess; This Is the Night; The Awful Truth; Topper; Mission: Impossible - Dead Reckoning Part One; The Sweet Body of Deborah; Paranoia [1969]

Watched: The Law and Jake Wade; Stranger Things ("Holly, Jolly")

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