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The 500th release from Quartet Records is an expanded score CD for director Sydney Pollack's 1968 comedy Western THE SCALPHUNTERS. This disc will feature both Elmer Bernstein's original LP re-recording of his score as well as the previously unreleased original film tracks. 

The label is also releasing a remastered edition of Ennio Morricone's music for Pier Paolo Pasolini's ARABIAN NIGHTS, and for vinyl collectors they are releasing a five-disc set of Jerry Goldsmith's scores for the first three RAMBO movies, with liner notes by our own Jeff Bond.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Arabian Nights
- Ennio Morricone - Quartet
Black Adam - Lorne Balfe - WaterTower [2-disc CD-R]
The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power - Bear McCreary - Mondo 
The Scalphunters
- Elmer Bernstein - Quartet
There's Always Hope
 - Guy Farley - Caldera 


IN THEATERS TODAY

Aftersun - Oliver Coates
The Banshees of Inisherin - Carter Burwell
Black Adam - Lorne Balfe - 2-disc score CD-R on WaterTower
The Domestic - Bradley Katzen
The Good Nurse - Biosphere
My Policeman - Steven Price
Ticket to Paradise - Lorne Balfe
Voodoo Macbeth - Jongnic Bontemps
Wendell & Wild - Bruno Coulais 


COMING SOON

October 28 
Frozen Planet II
  - Hans Zimmer, Adam Lukas, James Everingham - Silva
Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life
 - Alan Silvestri - Varese Sarabande CD Club 
Stand By For Action! Gerry Anderson in Concert 
- Barry Gray - Silva
November 4
The Godfather Suite
 - Carmine Coppola, Nino Rota - Silva
Mark Isham: Music for Film
 - Mark Isham - Silva
Stranger Things 4: Vol. 1 - Kyle Dixon, Michael Stein - Lakeshore
November 25
Archive 81 - Ben Salisbury, Geoff Barrow - Invada
Stingray
 - Barry Gray - Silva
Coming Soon
Claret
 - Oscar Martin Leanizabarrutia - Kronos
Doctor Who Series 13: Flux/Revolution of the Daleks
 - Segun Akinola - Silva
Don't Worry Darling - John Powell - Mondo/WaterTower
Il Conte Dracula
 - Bruno Nicolai - Digitmovies
Jack Mimoun et les secrets de Val Verde
 - Mathieu Lamboley - Music Box
La scarlatine/Tir a vue
 - Gabriel Yared - Music Box
Le rouge et le noir
 - Philippe Sarde - Music Box
Motorcycle Gang
 - Albert Glasser - Kronos
Nati Morti 
- Danielle Marinelli, Riccardo Adamo - Digitmovies 
Nino Rota: Bandes Originales De Films 1956-1961
 - Nino Rota - Music Box
Notre-Dame
 - Eric Demarsan - Music Box
The Proud and Damned
 - Gene Kauer, Douglas M. Lackey - Kronos 
Suoni Velati
 -  Matteo Cremolini - Kronos  
Une Belle Course
 - Philippe Rombi - Music Box


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

October 21 - Joseph Mullendore born (1914)
October 21 - Malcolm Arnold born (1921)
October 21 - John W. Morgan born (1946)
October 21 - Brian Banks born (1955)
October 21 - Lyle Workman born (1957)
October 21 - Jerry Goldsmith records his replacement score for Seven Days in May (1963)
October 21 - David Newman begins recording his score for Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure (1987)
October 21 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Melora” (1993)
October 21 - Gregory Smith records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “The Assignment” (1996)
October 21 - David Shire begins recording his score for Rear Window (1998)
October 21 - Gianni Ferrio died (2013)
October 22 - Joseph Kosma born (1905)
October 22 - Giorgio Gaslini born (1929)
October 22 - Ed Welch born (1947)
October 22 - Greg Hawkes born (1952)
October 22 - Hans J. Salter begins recording his score for The Far Horizons (1954)
October 22 - Miklos Rozsa begins recording his score to Bhowani Junction (1955)
October 22 - Marc Shaiman born (1959)
October 22 - Hugo Friedhofer begins recording his score to Never So Few (1959)
October 22 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode "Body in the Barn" (1963)
October 22 - Nuno Malo born (1977)
October 23 - Manos Hadjidakis born (1925)
October 23 - Gary McFarland born (1933)
October 23 - Recording sessions begin for Dimitri Tiomkin’s score for Lost Horizon (1936)
October 23 - Graeme Revell born (1955)
October 23 - Jonathan Wolff born (1958)
October 23 - David Kitay born (1961)
October 23 - Duane Tatro’s score for The Invaders episode “The Prophet” is recorded (1967)
October 23 - Duane Tatro records his only Mission: Impossible score, for the episode “Ultimatum” (1972)
October 23 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Rejoined” (1995)
October 23 - David Bell records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Treachery, Faith and the Great River” (1998)
October 23 - Paul Baillargeon records his score for the Enterprise episode “The Andorian Incident” (2001)
October 23 - Ray Ellis died (2008)
October 24 - Bill Wyman born (1936)
October 24 - Ernest Irving died (1953)
October 24 - John Frizzell born (1966)
October 24 - David Bell records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Sacrifice of Angels” (1997)
October 24 - Merl Saunders died (2008)
October 25 - Konrad Elfers born (1919)
October 25 - Don Banks born (1923)
October 25 - Recording sessions begin for Alex North's score to I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955)
October 25 - Bronislau Kaper begins recording his score to The Brothers Karamazov (1958)
October 25 - Alexander Courage's "Plato's Stepchildren," the last score composed for the original Star Trek series, is recorded (1968)
October 25 - Billy Goldenberg begins recording his score for Duel (1971)
October 25 - Benny Golson records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Blues” (1971)
October 25 - David Shire begins recording his score for Max Dugan Returns (1982)
October 25 - Richard Hazard begins recording his score for Airplane 2: The Sequel (1982)
October 25 - Recording sessions begin for W.G. Snuffy Walden’s score for The Stand (1993)
October 25 - Recording sessions begin for Danny Elfman’s score for Good Will Hunting (1997)
October 26 - Bob Cobert born (1924)
October 26 - Jacques Loussier born (1934)
October 26 - Victor Schertzinger died (1941)
October 26 - Recording sessions begin for Roy Webb's score to Fixed Bayonets (1951)
October 26 - Curt Sobel born (1953)
October 26 - Richard La Salle records his score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “Unchained Woman” (1979)
October 26 - Howard Shore begins recording his score for She-Devil (1989)
October 27 - Samuel Matlovsky born (1921)
October 27 - Recording sessions begin for Hugo Friedhofer's score for Ace in the Hole (1950)
October 27 - Recording sessions begin for Hugo Friedhofer’s score for The Rains of Ranchipur (1955)
October 27 - Richard Markowitz records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Green Terror” (1966)
October 27 - John Williams begins recording his score for Pete ‘n’ Tillie (1972)
October 27 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for The Enforcer (1976)
October 27 - Frank DeVol died (1999)
October 27 - James Newton Howard begins recording his score to Peter Pan (2003)
October 27 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Cold Station 12” (2004)
October 27 - Hans Werner Henze died (2012)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

CATHERINE CALLED BIRDY - Carter Burwell
 
"But the star performer here is Bella Ramsey, and she’s delightful, funny, and odd, striking a perfect balance between contemporary attitudes and period style. And frankly, that description fits the film as well. Dunham displays real growth as a filmmaker, not just in obvious, surface ways like the striking look (Laurie Rose is the cinematographer), sound (the music is by the great Carter Burwell), period settings, and dress. It’s the smoothness of the camerawork, the clarity of the compositions, the consistency of the performances, and most of all -- and this has always been a tricky element for Dunham, up to and including the mostly successful 'Sharp Stick' -- the evenness of tone."
 
Jason Bailey, The Playlist 

"Still, Dunham’s brave move out of her contemporary comfort zone isn’t an unalloyed success. Occasionally flummoxed by the scale of the period canvas, she slathers too many somewhat shapeless scenes in Carter Burwell’s incessantly cheery a capella score, and gets stuck in a plodding pace that makes the movie seem longer than it actually is."
 
Trevor Johnston, Time Out 
 
ONE WAY - Raffertie
 
"There are some pieces of 'One Way' that work well. Baker is a convincing lowlife, his supporting cast is outstanding, and the composer Raffertie’s distorted electric guitar score brings an edgy energy. But despite director Andrew Baird’s best efforts, this movie -- written by Ben Conway -- still mostly consists of a guy making phone calls on a dark bus. Although Baird shows what’s happening on the other end of those calls, the action remains largely static. The film is a case study in why critics say 'show, don’t tell.' It’s 90 minutes of people talking about routine gangster stuff, peppered with occasional gunfire."
 
Noel Murray, Los Angeles Times 
 
PEARL - Tyler Bates, Tim Williams
 
"West's film takes place in a world that is sick, as the Spanish Flu has reached the states, causing people to wear masks and be isolated. That’s a stronger period element than the movie’s presentation; there’s a nagging effect that in spite of the production design -- those cars, dresses, and even a full-out dance sequence—that the movie is so self-amused it’s practically baiting people who go to old movies in theaters to laugh at the niceties and mannerisms of earlier eras. It can be accomplished in other facets, like the gorgeous wall-to-wall score by Tyler Bates and Tim Williams that kicks off with a sumptuous main theme, but the aesthetic gambit of 'Pearl' registers more as being cute than immersive."
 
Nick Allen, RogerEbert.com 

"Where 'X' was heavily inspired by the cheap, DIY aesthetic of early indie slashers, 'Pearl' is aimed at replicating colorful visions in the vein of 'Mary Poppins.' Cinematographer Eliot Rockett imbues the film with bright, vivid colors, a soft palette, and a dreamlike quality, while Tyler Bates and Tim Williams’ score gives the film a rousing symphonic sound that makes Pearl’s journey feel as grand as Maria’s in 'The Sound of Music.' 'Pearl' is pure pastiche in style, but it works wonderfully, and it resonates as something that expresses West’s reverence, rather than as a parody or simple imitation."
 
Rafael Motamayor, Polygon 
 
"If 'X' is a loving homage to the slasher/sexploitation genre, 'Pearl' is a loving homage to early Hollywood films, from the sweeping score to the bathed-in-Technicolor nightmare. When the movie starts there is a black screen and then … the sound of a 'projector' starts up … whirr. Yeah, that’s right, West put that in. Then for the rest of the run time, he serves us a veritable feast of good old-fashioned grindhouse glory. It might be all dolled up, but we see what’s there, underneath."
 
Sarah Jane, The Austin Chronicle 

"Before that she retreats into a technicolor imaginary, vividly colorful and scored with studio-era pizzazz. Take the opening sequence: the camera dollies through big barn doors to see the family farmhouse, quaint as you like, backed by rolling hills and a cloudless sky, all with the saturation turned up to eleven. It’s a fun albeit curious choice if you think about it for more than a moment: that 'X' so readily aped the ‘70s was appropriate for a slasher set in that latter decade, where 'Pearl' locates itself a good twenty years before Dorothy was sucked out of Kansas."
 
Jack King, The Playlist 

"Now, the connection between the two women is made clear, as we learn that Pearl was also raised by ultra-conservative parents who disapproved of her desire to become a Hollywood chorus girl. Turning back the clock from 1979 to 1918, the sumptuously shot and lavishly scored film finds a far-younger Pearl, naive but not necessarily innocent, looking like some kind of demented Pippi Longstocking with her gingham dress and braided hair. Her only real escape from rural tedium is going to the pictures in town. She’d love to star in one herself and nearly loses her mind when well-meaning sister-in-law Mitzy (Emma Jenkins-Purro) mentions a local dance audition."
 
Peter Debruge, Variety 

"If the resulting series of kills stints on imagination and lacks much of a genuine scare factor, the prequel’s retro stylings are a treat. The saturated colors of cinematographer Eliot Rockett’s visuals practically leap off the screen and the big surging sounds of Tyler Bates and Tim Williams’ old-school orchestral score signal high drama and danger from the start. The vintage title font and inventive use of wipes and dissolves in scene transitions complete the winking 1950s illusion."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter 

THE RETALIATORS - Kyle Dixon, Michael Stein
 
"They’re all ready for their close-ups -- because they’re signed with the content company that also produced the film. This might not bother the headbanger crowd, but it comes across as a blatantly mercenary compromise of the overall work, and it takes precious cues away from 'Stranger Things' composers Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein. The low point comes during one of Bishop’s sermons, when dozens of middle-aged men and pre-teen girls sit approvingly in their pews as the hard rock band From Ashes To New grinds out a triple-decibel live song. When the congregants improbably leap to their feet to give the band a rousing standing ovation, we’re not sure if they’re celebrating the performance or the smattering of Amazon Music downloads that’ll result from it."
 
Mark Keizer, The Onion AV Club 

THE WOMAN KING - Terence Blanchard
 
"But when 'The Woman King' works, it’s majestic. The tactile costumes by Gersha Phillips ('Star Trek Discovery') and the detailed production design by Akin McKenzie ('Wild Life' and 'When They See Us') feel lived in and vibrant, especially in the vital rendering of the Dahomey Kingdom, which is teeming with scenes of color and community. Terilyn A. Shropshire’s slick, intelligent editing allows this grand epic to breathe. And the evocative score by Terence Blanchard and Lebo M. gives voice to the Agojie’s fighting spirit."
 
Robert Daniels, RogerEbert.com 

"'The Woman King' flirts with hokeyness and self-importance, most especially communicated through the parts of Terence Blanchard and Lebo M’s score and soundtrack that sound like they’re from a 1990s historical epic, as opposed to the parts where it feels like it’s trying to evoke a new imagination of cinematic Africa. However, the earnestness of Dana Stevens’ script and commitment of its performers -- adorned in gorgeous, authentic-feeling costumes (Gersha Phillips) and makeup (Giovanna Perry’s team) -- situate us in the beautiful Benin and South Africa locales. What puts it over the top is well-choreographed action that is simultaneously beautiful and brutal, just like the Agojie."
 
Kevin Fox Jr., Paste Magazine 

"Prince-Bythewood steers us through these sequences with terrific sweep and urgency, lingering just long enough for you to take in this world in all its rich, tactile particulars, from the straw roofs and red earthen walls of Akin McKenzie’s production design to the intricately patterned fabrics and elaborate beadwork of Gersha Phillips’ costumes. (Terence Blanchard’s moving score heightens the immersion.) At times you wish the director would linger longer still, the better to let a deeper understanding of Dahomey’s rigid rules, meticulous hierarchies and tangled alliances seep into your bones."
 
Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times
 
"Terence Blanchard’s orchestral score and Polly Morgan’s cinematography give the film an epiclike sweeping feel. The fight scenes are big, bombastic, and often brutal. Again, 'RRR' has set the bar impossibly high in that department, but 'The Woman King' holds up well. The battle scenes are an enormous undertaking for fight coordinator Daniel Hernandez and the stunt performers, who execute them with the same rigor and attention to detail even when in the background or out of focus. "
 
Martin Tsai, The Wrap

"The training of the newest cohort of fighters frames the first half of 'The Woman King', which takes great care to build a detailed portrait of Agojie life in the Dahomey Kingdom. These scenes, in addition to the action sequences, showcase Akin McKenzie and Gersha Phillips’ crisp production and costume designs. We see the youngest women doing drills within the palace’s terra cotta walls, running laps through the tall grasslands of the surrounding area and wrestling each other to improve their tactical skills. There’s also a palpable sororal energy between these women, young and old. In Amenza (Sheila Atim), Nanisca has a devoted friend; in Izogie (a wonderful Lashana Lynch), Nawi finds comfort and necessary reality checks. These montages are backed by Terence Blanchard’s exuberant score."
 
Lovia Gyarkye, The Hollywood Reporter 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

October 21
BASIC INSTINCT (Jerry Goldsmith) [New Beverly]

BLACK ORPHEUS (Luis Bonfa, Antonio Carlos Jobim) [BrainDead Studios]
BURNING (Mowg) [Alamo Drafthouse]
GRINDHOUSE: DEATH PROOF [New Beverly]
LA BRUJA (Raul Lavista), SANTA SANGRE (Simon Boswell) [Academy Museum]
LA GUERRE EST FINIE (Giovanni Fusco) [Los Feliz 3] 
MAGHADEERA (M.N. Keeravani) [Aero]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SHAUN OF THE DEAD (Daniel Mudford, Pete Woodhead) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
28 DAYS LATER (John Murphy) [BrainDead Studios]
VERTIGO (Bernard Herrmann) [New Beverly]

October 22
BEDEVILLED (Kim Tae-seong) [Academy Museum]
THE BOXTROLLS (Dario Marianelli) [Academy Museum]
THE CRAFT (Graeme Revell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
CRAZY MAMA [Los Feliz 3]
EL ESCAPULARIO (Gustavo Carreon), MISTERIOS DE ULTRATUMBA (Gustavo Carreon) [Academy Museum]
HEARTBREAKERS (John Debney) [Los Feliz 3]
MAD MONSTER PARTY? (Maury Laws) [New Beverly]
A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (Charles Bernstein) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse]
RE-ANIMATOR (Richard Band) [New Beverly]
SHAUN OF THE DEAD (Daniel Mudford, Pete Woodhead) [Alamo Drafthouse]
STOLEN KISSES (Antoine Duhamel) [Los Feliz 3]
TURNING RED (Ludwig Goransson) [Aero]
VERTIGO (Bernard Herrmann) [New Beverly]

October 23
BED AND BOARD (Antoine Duhamel) [Los Feliz 3]

BEETLEJUICE (Danny Elfman) [Alamo Drafthouse]
BELOVED (Rachel Portman) [Academy Museum]
BURNING (Mowg) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE CRAFT (Graeme Revell) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE FACULTY (Marco Beltrami) [BrainDead Studios]
THE HAUNTED MANSION (Mark Mancina) [Los Feliz 3] 
MAD MONSTER PARTY? (Maury Laws) [New Beverly]
MUNECOS INFERNALES, HASTA EL VIENTO TIENE MIEDE (Raul Lavista) [Academy Museum]
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (Walter Schumann) [BrainDead Studios]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
RESIDENT EVIL (Marco Beltrami, Marilyn Manson) [Los Feliz 3]
TEOREMA (Ennio Morricone) [BrainDead Studios]
VERTIGO (Bernard Herrmann) [New Beverly] 

October 24
THE CHANGELING (Ken Wannberg, Rich Wilkins) [Los Feliz 3]
THE CRAFT (Graeme Revell) [Los Feliz 3]
DRACULA: DEAD AND LOVING IT (Hummie Mann), REPOSSESSED (Charles Fox) [New Beverly]
THE GUEST (Steve Moore) [Alamo Drafthouse]
INCEPTION (Hans Zimmer) [Academy Museum]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse]  

October 25
BURNING (Mowg) [Alamo Drafthouse]  
FINAL DESTINATION (Shirley Walker) [Los Feliz 3]
LOVE ON THE RUN (Georges Delerue) [Los Feliz 3]
PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK (Bruce Smeaton) [New Beverly]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse]  
SPOOKIES (James Calabrese, Kenneth Higgins) [Alamo Drafthouse]

October 26
THE GUEST (Steve Moore) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
INFERNAL AFFAIRS III (Chan Kwong Wing) [Los Feliz 3]
PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK (Bruce Smeaton) [New Beverly]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
SCARY MOVIE (David Kitay) [Los Feliz 3]
SPOOKIES (James Calabrese, Kenneth Higgins) [Alamo Drafthouse]

October 27
ALICE, SWEET ALICE (Stephen Lawrence), HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME (Bo Harwood, Lance Rubin) [New Beverly]
LAS AMANTES DEL SENOR DE LA NOCHE (Pedro Plasencia, Pancho Saenz), ALUCARDA (Tony Guefen) [Academy Museum]
A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (Charles Bernstein) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (Carter Burwell) [Los Feliz 3]
SLEEPY HOLLOW (Danny Elfman) [Los Feliz 3]
TARGETS (Charles Greene, Brian Stone) [Aero]

October 28
ALICE, SWEET ALICE (Stephen Lawrence), HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME (Bo Harwood, Lance Rubin) [New Beverly] 
BONES (Elia Cmiral) [Los Feliz 3]
BREAKDOWN (Basil Poledouris) [New Beverly]
CASPER (James Horner) [Los Feliz 3]
THE CHASER (Yong-rock Choi, Jun-seok Kim), EPITAPH [Academy Museum]
GRINDHOUSE: DEATH PROOF [New Beverly]
MELANCHOLIA [BrainDead Studios]
MISERY (Marc Shaiman), THE DARK HALF (Christopher Young) [aero]
THE QUIET EARTH (John Charles) [BrainDead Studios]
RESIDENT EVIL (Marco Beltrami, Marilyn Manson) [Los Feliz 3]
SHAUN OF THE DEAD (Daniel Mudford, Pete Woodhead) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE SHINING (Wendy Carlos, Rachel Elkind) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TALES FROM THE CRYPT PRESENTS: DEMON KNIGHT (Edward Shearmur) [Los Feliz 3]

October 29
THE BAD SEED (Alex North) [Los Feliz 3]
BEETLEJUICE (Danny Elfman) [New Beverly]
BELLADONNA OF SADNESS (Masahiko Sato)  [BrainDead Studios]
THE EXORCIST [New Beverly]
THE FACULTY (Marco Beltrami) [Los Feliz 3]
HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE (Joe Hisasihi) [Alamo Drafthouse]
I SAW THE DEVIL (Mowg) [Academy Museum]
PARANORMAN (Jon Brion) [Academy Museum]
THE RING (Hans Zimmer) [Los Feliz 3]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SCREAM 2 (Marco Beltrami) [Los Feliz 3]
THE SHINING (Wendy Carlos, Rachel Elkind) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SON OF SAUL [BrainDead Studios] 
TASTE THE BLOOD OF DRACULA (James Bernard), FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (James Bernard) [New Beverly]
THIRST (Cho Young-Wuk) [Academy Museum]
TRICK 'R' TREAT (Douglas Pipes) [Alamo Drafthouse]
VAMPYR [BrainDead Studios]

October 30
ABBOTT & COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (Frank Skinner) [Los Feliz 3]
BEETLEJUICE (Danny Elfman) [Academy Museum]
BEETLEJUICE (Danny Elfman) [New Beverly]
BILL & TED'S BOGUS JOURNEY (David Newman) [BrainDead Studios]
CORALINE (Bruno Coluais) [Academy Museum]
FRANKENSTEIN [Los Feliz 3]
THE GANGSTER, THE COP, THE DEVIL (Yeong-wook Jo) [Alamo Drafthouse]
GREMLINS (Jerry Goldsmith), THE HOWLING (Pino Donaggio) [Hollywood Legion]
HOUSE OF 1000 CORPSES (Rob Zombie) [Los Feliz 3]
HOWL'S MOVING CASTLE (Joe Hisasihi) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PARANORMAN (Jon Brion) [Academy Museum]
SCREAM 2 (Marco Beltrami) [Los Feliz 3]
SHAUN OF THE DEAD (Daniel Mudford, Pete Woodhead) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TALES FROM THE CRYPT PRESENTS: DEMON KNIGHT (Edward Shearmur) [BrainDead Studios]
TASTE THE BLOOD OF DRACULA (James Bernard), FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (James Bernard) [New Beverly]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
The Chairman (Goldsmith); The Woman in Black 2: Angel of Death (Beltrami/Roberts/Trumpp); Chinatown (Goldsmith); Fibs (Meredith); Chinese Box (Revell, various); Varmints (Meredith); Crazy Rich Asians (Tyler); Orbitones, Spoon Harps & Bellowphones (various); Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Tan Dun); The Neverending Story II (Folk); Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story (Edelman); Valley of the Dolls (Williams/Previn)

Read: The Patriot Game, by George V. Higgins

Seen: The Wicker Man [1973]; El vampiro sangriente; La invasion de los vampiros; TAR; Triangle of Sadness; Museo del horror; El baron del terror; Kwaidan; The Host [2006]; La Cienaga; Amsterdam; Dressed to Kill [1980]; Eyes of Laura Mars

Watched: Penny Dreadful ("Predators Far and Near"); You're the Worst ("Try Real Hard"); True Detective ("The Great War and Modern Memory"); Silicon Valley ("Fiduciary Duty"); Fury [1936]; Justified ("The Devil You Know"); Creatures the World Forgot; Law & Order ("Poison Ivy")


If you have the feeling that fewer scores for new films are getting released on physical media these days, you're probably right. As far as I can tell, these are all the major release 2022 English-language films that have had score CDs released or announced:

The Batman
Don’t Worry Darling
Downton Abbey: A New Era
Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore
Firestarter
Halloween Ends
Jurassic World: Dominion
Moonfall
Nope
The Northman
Operation Mincemeat
The Outfit 
Scream
Sonic the Hedgehog 2
Top Gun: Maverick
Turning Red
Uncharted
Where the Crawdads Sing
 
And these are all the 2022 scores getting vinyl-only releases:
 
The Black Phone
Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness*
Hustle
Lightyear
Smile
Thor: Love and Thunder
X

*A limited edition which sold out within hours and has still not been re-pressed, despite what one might assume is some pretty high demand. I know I'd sure like to have one.
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Comments (9):Log in or register to post your own comments
I love Quartet, but who was asking for the LP versions of Rambo?

I love Quartet, but who was asking for the LP versions of Rambo?

Nobody here, but Quartet has been releasing vinyl for about four years now, quite a few of which have sold out, so I would assume they know their audience better than we do.

I love Quartet, but who was asking for the LP versions of Rambo?

Nobody here, but Quartet has been releasing vinyl for about four years now, quite a few of which have sold out, so I would assume they know their audience better than we do.


Your comment in another recent thread: "Nobody knows what the audience will want."

I'm one of those people who still prefer CDs to vinyl, but I'm also one who would rather watch a scratchy 35mm print of an older film than a crisp modern digital version, so I can't really judge other people's format preferences.

I still find the unpredictability of vinyl quality a little maddening. I had a lot of time to play vinyl during the shutdown, and in short succession I played a decades-old, used vinyl copy of Forbidden World which sounded flawless, and a new, sealed copy of The Devil's Candy which had notable surface noise.

Your comment in another recent thread: "Nobody knows what the audience will want."

Ha! I think you're just teasing me, but just in caseā€¦

Quartet knows that vinyl, in general, sells for them. They do not know if any specific vinyl will sell for them.

Just as Disney+ knows that Star Wars, in general, is successful for them. They do not know if any specific show will be. Warner Bros. Discovery knows that comic book films, in general, are successful. They do not know if Black Adam will be.

I love Quartet, but who was asking for the LP versions of Rambo?

Nobody here, but Quartet has been releasing vinyl for about four years now, quite a few of which have sold out, so I would assume they know their audience better than we do.


Your comment in another recent thread: "Nobody knows what the audience will want."



I like LP for the cover art, other than that, I do not see the point. I wonder how many units of the sold out LP are really because the like the packaging and they never actually plan the album itself.

I'm one of those people who still prefer CDs to vinyl, but I'm also one who would rather watch a scratchy 35mm print of an older film than a crisp modern digital version, so I can't really judge other people's format preferences.

I still find the unpredictability of vinyl quality a little maddening. I had a lot of time to play vinyl during the shutdown, and in short succession I played a decades-old, used vinyl copy of Forbidden World which sounded flawless, and a new, sealed copy of The Devil's Candy which had notable surface noise.


Yes, agree. And, likely I am one of the few people that knows what your avatar picture is from.
I like that film very much.

I'm also a big Metropolitan fan (and of Whit Stillman in general), but I mostly chose that avatar because the actor looks like a younger, better looking version of me.

I'm also a big Metropolitan fan (and of Whit Stillman in general), but I mostly chose that avatar because the actor looks like a younger, better looking version of me.

Funny Scott, I love Stillman films, but I think Metropolitan is my personal favorite. There is something about the rawness of his talent and shooting that film with scrapped together locations at parents apartments and without permits in the streets of New York. And all of his young cast were really quite good, especially your doppelganger.

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