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IN THEATERS TODAY

The Card Counter - Robert Levon Been, Giancarlo Vulcano 
Dating & New York - Grant Fonda
Everybody's Talking About Jamie - Dan Gillespie Sells, Anne Dudley - Song CD due Oct. 1 on Republic
The Jenkins Family Christmas - Mark Leggett
Kate - Nathan Barr
Language Lessons - Gaby Moreno
Malignant - Joseph Bishara
Mogul Mowgli - Paul Corley
Queenpins - Siddhartha Khosla
Small Engine Repair - Kathryn Kluge, Kim Allen Kluge 


COMING SOON

September 17
The David Spear Collection Vol. 2
 - David Spear - Dragon's Domain
Glory - James Horner - La-La Land
Meetings with Remarkable Men
 - Laurence Rosenthal, Thomas De Hartmann - Dragon's Domain
Stripes - Elmer Bernstein - La-La Land
Webs and Other Wonders
 - John Scott - Dragon's Domain
October 1
No Time to Die - Hans Zimmer - Decca
October 15 
Halloween Kills
 - John Carpenter, Cody Carpenter, Daniel Davies - Sacred Bones
November 19
Without Remorse - Jonsi - Krunk
Date Unknown
The Bra
- Cyril Morin - Saimel
Man of God
 - Zbigniew Preisner - Caldera
The Time Traveler
 - Stanley Myers - Notefornote 


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

September 10 - Arnold Schwarzwald born (1918)
September 10 - Johnny Keating born (1927)
September 10 - Hugo Riesenfeld died (1939)
September 10 - Roy Ayers born (1940)
September 10 - Jack Beaver died (1963)
September 10 - Les Baxter records his score for the U.S. release of Black Sabbath (1963)
September 10 - Richard Shores records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Sedgewick Curse” (1968)
September 10 - Richard LaSalle records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “The Unsuspected” (1969)
September 10 - Allan Gray died (1973)
September 10 - Laurence Rosenthal records his score for 21 Hours at Munich (1976)
September 10 - Bruce Broughton records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Welcome to My Nightmare" (1986)
September 10 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his sixth Emmy, for Young Indiana Jones and the Hollywood Follies; Don Davis wins his second Emmy, for the SeaQuest DSV episode “Daggers;” Jerry Goldsmith wins his fifth and final Emmy, for the Star Trek: Voyager theme (1995)
September 10 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “A Time to Stand” (1997)
September 10 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Enterprise episode “Shockwave, Part 2” (2002)
September 10 - Carter Burwell wins the Emmy for part 5 of Mildred Pierce; Trevor Morris wins his second Emmy, for The Borgias’ main title theme; Garth Neustadter wins for the American Masters episode “John Muir in the New World” (2011)
September 10 - Gert Wilden died (2015)
September 10 - Sean Callery wins his fourth Emmy, for the theme to Marvel’s Jessica Jones; Mac Quayle wins his first Emmy, for the Mr. Robot episode score “eps1.0_ hellofriend.mov;” Danny Elfman wins his second Emmy, for his music direction of Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton; Victor Reyes wins his first Emmy, for The Night Manager episode 2 (2016)
September 11 - Herbert Stothart born (1885)
September 11 - Arvo Part born (1935)
September 11 - Leo Kottke born (1945)
September 11 - Hugo Friedhofer begins recording his score to Between Heaven and Hell (1956)
September 11 - Stu Philips begins recording his replacement score to The Appointment (1969)
September 11 - Gerald Fried and Quincy Jones win the Emmy for Part 1 of Roots; Leonard Rosenman and Alan & Marilyn Bergman win for Sybil (1977)
September 11 - Fred Steiner records his only Star Trek: The Next Generation episode score, for “Code of Honor” (1987)
September 11 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his fifth Emmy, for the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Vienna, 1908;” Lennie Niehaus wins for the cable movie Lush Life; John Debney wins for his SeaQuest DSV main title theme (1994)
September 11 - Bruce Broughton wins his ninth Emmy, for Warm Springs (2005); Michael Giacchino wins for the Lost pilot score; Danny Elfman wins for Desperate Housewives’s main title theme (2005)
September 11 - Antoine Duhamel died (2014)
September 12 - Wolfgang Zeller born (1893)
September 12 - Gavriil Popov born (1904)
September 12 - David Raksin begins recording his score for Laura (1944)
September 12 - Christopher Dedrick born (1947)
September 12 - Hans Zimmer born (1957)
September 12 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “Terror at Northfield” (1963)
September 12 - Lalo Schifrin begins recording his score to Bullitt (1968)
September 12 - Nathan Larson born (1970)
September 12 - Jerry Goldsmith wins his fourth Emmy, for part 2 of Masada; Bruce Broughton wins his first Emmy, for “The Satyr” episode of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1981)
September 12 - Franz Grothe died (1982)
September 12 - Patrick Williams wins his second Emmy, for the TV movie The Princess and the Cabbie; David Rose wins for the Little House on the Prairie episode score “He Was Only Twelve – Part 2” (1981)
September 12 - Recording sessions begin for Pino Donaggio's Body Double score (1984)
September 12 - William Alwyn died (1985)
September 12 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Darmok” (1991)
September 12 - Bruce Broughton wins his eighth Emmy, for Eloise at Christmastime; Velton Ray Bunch wins for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Similitude;” Randy Newman wins for Monk’s second season main title theme (2004)
September 12 - John Willliams wins the Main Title Theme Emmy for Great Performances; Howard Goodall wins for the cable movie Into the Storm; Joseph LoDuca wins for the Legend of the Seeker episode “The Prophecy” (2009)
September 12 - Rachel Portman wins her first Emmy, for Bessie; Jeff Beal wins for House of Cards, “Chapter 32;” Dustin O’Halloran wins for Transparent’s main title theme (2015)
September 13 - Leith Stevens born (1909)
September 13 - Maurice Jarre born (1924)
September 13 - Gene Page born (1939)
September 13 - Harvey R. Cohen born (1951)
September 13 - Don Was was born (1952)
September 13 - David Mansfield born (1956)
September 13 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Beloved Infidel (1959)
September 13 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode "A Home Away from Home" (1963)
September 13 - Evan Evans born (1975)
September 13 - James Guymon born (1977)
September 13 - Billy Goldenberg wins his fourth Emmy, for Rage of Angels; Bruce Broughton wins his second Emmy, for the Dallas episode “The Ewing Blues” (1983)
September 13 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy” (1999)
September 13 - Bruce Broughton wins his seventh Emmy, for Eloise at the Plaza; Sean Callery wins for the 24 episode “10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.”; Jeff Beal wins his first Emmy, for Monk’s main title theme (2003)
September 13 - Jeff Beal wins his third Emmy, for part 1 of The Company; Jim Dooley wins for the Pushing Daisies episode “Pigeon;” Russ Landau wins for Pirate Master’s main title theme (2008)
September 14 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Cimarron (1960)
September 14 - John Williams records his score for the Lost in Space episode "Island in the Sky" (1965)
September 14 - Sol Kaplan's score to the Star Trek episode "The Enemy Within" is recorded (1966)
September 14 - Gerald Fried records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Odds on Evil” (1966)
September 14 - Recording sessions begin for Danny Elfman’s score for Scrooged (1988)
September 14 - Alan Silvestri begins recording his score for Back to the Future Part II (1989)
September 14 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his seventh Emmy, for The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Travels with Father;” John Debney and Louis Febre win for the pilot episode to The Cape; Mark Isham wins for his main title theme to EZ Streets (1997)
September 14 - George Fenton wins his first Emmy, for the Blue Planet episode “Seas of Life: Ocean World;” Adrian Johnston wins for Shackleton Part II; Thomas Newman wins for the Six Feet Under main title theme (2002)
September 14 - Marco Beltrami and Brandon Roberts win the documentary score Emmy for Free Solo (2019)
September 15 - Gail Kubik born (1914)
September 15 - Shinichiro Ikebe born (1943)
September 15 - Recording sessions begin for Bronsislau Kaper's score for The Naked Spur (1952)
September 15 - Leigh Harline begins recording his score for Visit to a Small Planet (1959)
September 15 - Oliver Wallace died (1963)
September 15 - Sol Kaplan begins recording his score for The Spy Who Came in from The Cold (1965)
September 15 - Alexander Courage records his score for the Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea episode “The Cyborg” (1965)
September 15 - Artie Kane records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “Collector’s Item” (1969)
September 15 - Don Ellis begins recording his score for The Deadly Tower (1975)
September 15 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for The Black Bird (1975)
September 15 - Bruce Montgomery died (1978)
September 15 - Leonard Rosenman begins recording his score for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)
September 15 - Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Evolution" (1989)
September 15 - Don Davis wins his first Emmy, for the Beauty and the Beast episode score “A Time to Kill; James Di Pasquale wins for the TV movie The Shell Seekers (1990)
September 15 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Non Sequitur” (1995)
September 15 - Aldemaro Romero died (2007)
September 15 - Javier Navarrete wins the Emmy for Hemingway & Gellhorn; John Lunn wins for episode 6 of Downton Abbey; Paul Englishby wins for Page Eight’s main title theme (2012)
September 15 - Bear McCreary wins his first Emmy, for Da Vinci’s Demons’ main title theme; John Lunn wins for episode 3.6 of Downton Abbey; Mychael Danna wins for the World Without End episode “Medieval Life and Death” (2013)
September 15 - Hildur Guonadottir wins the Emmy for her Chernobyl score; Ramin Djawadi wins for the Game of Thrones episode score “The Long Night” (2019)
September 16 - J. Peter Robinson born (1945)
September 16 - Alfred Newman begins recording his score to The Best of Everything (1959)
September 16 - Lyn Murray records his score for the Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “Triumph” (1964)
September 16 - Robert Drasnin records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “My Friend, My Enemy” (1970)
September 16 - John Barry begins recording his score for The Day of the Locust (1974)
September 16 - Bruce Broughton wins his third and fourth Emmys, for The First Olympics: Athens 1896 and for the Dallas episode score “The Letter” (1984)
September 16 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “The Circle” (1993)
September 16 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Storm Front, Part 1” (2004)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

AWAKE - Antonio Pinto
 
"Raso’s touch with score can feel heavy, but he more than makes up for it with honest emotional moments and well-executed plot points. Jill makes good decisions -- a major relief to those exhausted by the horrible-choices-for-plot-convenience trope. A word to the interested: Avoid the trailer, as it contains a fair number of spoilers."
 
Michael Ordona, Los Angeles Times 

"For good measure, Raso shrugs his way through one of the most annoying visual tropes in recent horror -- old, silent, naked people, seen as a brief roadside attraction in a sequence that means nothing, and only registers as 'scary' because the droning score is telling us so."
 
Nick Allen, The Playlist 
 
BLUE MIRACLE - Hanan Townshend
 
"That Quintana rose through the ranks as a protégé to Terrence Malick -- who executive-produced his 2016 debut 'The Vessel' -- is less obvious, given the film’s Disney-inflected storytelling and bright, straightforward filmmaking. It’s in the orphanage scenes, surprisingly, that he and cinematographer Santiago Benet Mari are most visually imaginative, painting its dank, under-funded interiors in enough shades of shadowed blue to rival the ocean itself, though the metaphorical parallel just lies there. The film’s waterborne sequences, by comparison, are more prosaic, assisted by digital effects that fall somewhat short at climactic angling moments. The generic swells and swoops of Hanan Townshend’s traditional scoring give way only in the closing credits to the punchier uplift of Christian Latino hip-hop artist GAWVI: 'Blue Miracle' would benefit from more such flavor, but it knows what works."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety 

CAVEAT - Richard G. Mitchell
 
"Richard G. Mitchell's superb score pulses and sweeps underneath the action, making something as benign as opening a door into a hair-raising event. The score is not over-used. On the contrary: there are long periods where the music drops out entirely. The music's absence is almost as unnerving as its presence."
 
Sheila O'Malley, RogerEbert.com

FLASHBACK - Pilotpriest (Anthony Scott Burns)

"Nevertheless, MacBride is always in full control of the modestly scaled feature’s refined aesthetics and storytelling focus, smoothly maintaining viewer interest if not always our full involvement. Brendan Steacy’s atmospheric widescreen cinematography and the spectral melancholy of Anthony Scott Burns aka Pilotpriest’s original score are binding elements in a movie whose ever-more-splintered narrative needs all the glue it can get."
 
Dennis Harvey, Variety 

MY HEART CAN'T BEAT UNLESS YOU TELL IT TO - Andrew Rease Shaw
 
"There are many Cuartases involved here, cinematographer Michael and production designer Rodrigo orchestrating the film’s warm, artful yet deliberately claustrophobic look within a near-square aspect ratio. Andrew Rease Shaw’s original score likewise applies a less-is-more discretion to heightening the limited."
 
Dennis Harvey, Variety

THE ONE AND ONLY DICK GREGORY - Kyle Townsend
 
"The editing, by Cinque Norton, Ron Eigen, and Patrick Murphy, achieves an essay-film suppleness and subtlety, making arguments through clever arrangement of images, not just by illustrating whatever a person happens to be talking about. The score, by Kyle Townsend, covers an impressive array of genres, variously situating Gregory within the contexts of blues, funk, Americana/folk, even symphonic classical, and musically driving home the idea that he was not simply a Black American but an American, and a citizen of the world. This approach resonates with King's comment that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
 
Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com 

RISE AGAIN: TULSA AND THE RED SUMMER - Paul Brill
 
"The way the documentary handles the moment leaves no room for feeling angry. In general, perhaps in seeking to encourage engagement, to handhold and not alienate or make uncomfortable, 'Rise Again' allows minimal room for anger, even when very earned. I often wish it would have. In avoiding that emotion, though, the rare mentions of such realities really stand out. At one point, J. Kavin Ross, a photojournalist and descendant of a Tulsa massacre survivor, recounts how his great-grandfather was unable to rebuild after his home was destroyed -- or sell his remaining land to save his business -- and lost everything after building a comfortable life for his family. 'He left the state of Oklahoma, never to return, and died angry' Ross states simply. It’s one of the most effecting lines in the entire documentary, due in part to how the documentary seems to consider it more of a throwaway and therefore doesn’t make Ross compete with a swell of ham-fisted dramatic stock music (this, unfortunately, does prove an issue elsewhere.)"
 
Ciara Wardlow, RogerEbert.com 

SCALES - Mike and Fabien Kourtzeer
 
"The position of Saudi women as second-class citizens receives a potent metaphoric visualization in Saudi helmer-writer Shahad Ameen’s parable-like debut drama, 'Scales.' Revealing more through imagery than dialogue, the tale unfolds on a barren island where tradition dictates that each family sacrifice a daughter to the sea maidens to ensure the local fishermen a good catch. With its glittering black-and-white cinematography, immersive sound design, eerie score and creepy reveal, the film taps into something primal and chilling, with the taut first third particularly strong. But the narrative’s momentum and clarity dissipate in the middle and final sections even as the visuals continue to impress. Still, the boldly inventive 'Scales' marks Ameen as a talent to watch."
 
Alissa Simon, Variety 
 
SEQUIN IN A BLUE ROOM - Brent Williams
 
"The director and his editor Tim Guthrie have inserted title cards demarcating the various spaces that Sequin encounters, though they’re hardly necessary. Tech credits are first-rate across the board, with Brent Williams providing an atmospheric soundscape for this particular descent into the underworld, ably balancing menace with a sense of wonder."
 
Harry Windsor, The Hollywood Reporter 

UNDER THE STADIUM LIGHTS - Erick Schroder
 
"Those 'Friday Night Lights' echoes are inevitable, and occasionally deliberately invoked: from the title (changed from its original name of 'Brother's Keeper') to parts of Erick Schroder's score that sound like Explosions in the Sky outtakes. But it's blitzed by the comparison. Between the cardboard characterization, the heavy-handed emotional outbursts, the intrusive murder subplot, locker room morale-boosting speeches that should have stayed in the locker room, a strange lack of meaningful emotional beats, and the utter inability to tackle its white-savior subtext, 'Under the Stadium Lights' is pee wee by comparison to Peter Berg's All-American."
 
Richard Whitaker, The Austin Chronicle 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

September 10
DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS (Elmer Bernstein) [New Beverly]
NIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH, BERLIN EXPRESS (Frederick Hollander) [Aero]
PLAY MISTY FOR ME (Dee Barton) [Landmark Westwood]
PULSE (Takefumi Haketa) [Los Feliz 3]
PULP FICTION [New Beverly]
SHAFT (Isaac Hayes) [Fairfax Cinema]
SHAFT (David Arnold) [Fairfax Cinema]
TERROR TRAIN (John Mills-Cockell) [Los Feliz 3]
2046 (Shigeru Umebayashi) [Los Feliz 3]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Marc Levinthal), CLUELESS (David Kitay) [New Beverly]
XANADU (Jeff Lynne, John Farrar, Barry DeVorzon) [Los Feliz 3]

September 11
BOOGIE NIGHTS (Michael Penn) [New Beverly]
ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (Jerry Fielding) [Landmark Westwood]
THE KARATE KID (Bill Conti) [New Beverly]
THE LATE SHOW (Ken Wannberg) [Los Feliz 3]
PERSONA [Fairfax Cinema]
POINT BREAK (Mark Isham) [Los Feliz 3]
POLYESTER (Chris Stein, Michael Kamen), CRY-BABY (Patrick Williams) [Aero]
ROLLER BOOGIE (Bob Esty, Craig Safan) [Los Feliz 3]
THE SECRET OF NIMH (Jerry Goldsmith) [Los Feliz 3]
SWEPT AWAY (Piero Piccioni) [Fairfax Cinema]
SWEPT AWAY (Michel Colombier) [Fairfax Cinema]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Marc Levinthal), CLUELESS (David Kitay) [New Beverly]

September 12
AS TEARS GO BY (Ting Yat Chung, Teddy Robin Kwan) [Aero]
BARB AND STAR GO TO VISTA DEL MAR (Christopher Lennertz, Dara Taylor) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DESERT HEARTS, THE WATERMELON WOMAN (Paul Shapiro) [Aero]
FALLEN ANGELS (Frankie Chan, Roel A. Garcia) [Los Feliz 3]
HORSE FEATHERS, DUCK SOUP [Los Feliz 3]
THE KARATE KID (Bill Conti) [New Beverly]
LES RENDEZ-VOUS D'ANNA [Los Feliz 3]
PAN'S LABYRINTH (Javier Navarrete) [Alamo Drafthouse]
POTO AND CABENGO [Fairfax Cinema]
SCARFACE [Fairfax Cinema]
SCARFACE (Giorgio Moroder) [Fairfax Cinema]
TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA (Ennio Morricone) [Landmark Westwood]
VALLEY GIRL (Scott Wilk, Marc Levinthal), CLUELESS (David Kitay) [New Beverly] 

September 13
CRY-BABY (Patrick Williams) [Los Feliz 3]
FALLEN ANGELS (Frankie Chan, Roel A. Garcia) [Los Feliz 3] 
FOXES (Giorgio Moroder), SUBURBIA (Alex Gibson) [New Beverly]
UNCUT GEMS (Daniel Lopatin) [Alamo Drafthouse]

September 14
FOXES (Giorgio Moroder), SUBURBIA (Alex Gibson) [New Beverly]
PULSE (Takefumi Haketa) [Los Feliz 3] 
TOKYO SONATA (Kazumasa Hashimoto) [Los Feliz 3]

September 15
BORN IN FLAMES [Los Feliz 3]
COMING TO AMERICA (Nile Rodgers) [Alamo Drafthouse]
HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER (Dee Barton) [Landmark Westwood]
KILLER OF SHEEP, THE EXILES (Anthony Hilder, The Revels, Robert Hafner, Eddie Sunrise) [New Beverly]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS (Howard Shore) [IPIC Westwood]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann) [Fairfax Cinema]
PSYCHO (Bernard Herrmann, Danny Elfman, Steve Bartek) [Fairfax Cinema]
WORKING GIRLS (David Van Tieghem) [Los Feliz 3]

September 16
DOG DAY AFTERNOON [Alamo Drafthouse]
GIRLFRIENDS (Michael Small) [Los Feliz 3]
KILLER OF SHEEP, THE EXILES (Anthony Hilder, The Revels, Robert Hafner, Eddie Sunrise) [New Beverly] 
MILLION DOLLAR BABY (Clint Eastwood) [Landmark Westwood]
MYSTERY TRAIN (John Lurie) [Los Feliz 3]
THE TRAIN (Maurice Jarre) [Aero]

September 17
ALPHABET CITY (Nile Rodgers) [Los Feliz 3]
BLADE RUNNER (Vangelis) [New Beverly]
THE HAUNTING (Humphrey Searle) [Fairfax Cinema]
THE HAUNTING (Jerry Goldsmith) [Fairfax Cinema]
JACKIE BROWN [New Beverly]
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (John Phillips) [Los Feliz 3]
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Leonard Rosenman), HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL! [New Beverly]
ROLLER BOOGIE (Bob Esty, Craig Safan) [Los Feliz 3]
TOKYO SONATA (Kazumasa Hashimoto) [Los Feliz 3]

September 18
AN AMERICAN TAIL (James Horner) [Los Feliz 3]
BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA (Wojciech Kilar) [Alamo Drafthouse]
CAT PEOPLE (Roy Webb) [Fairfax Cinema]
CAT PEOPLE (Giorgio Moroder) [Fairfax Cinema]
FRIDAY (Hidden Faces) [New Beverly]
THE GENERAL, SUPERCOP [Aero]
THE GRIFTERS (Elmer Bernstein) [Los Feliz 3]
JOE VS. THE VOLCANO (Georges Delerue) [Los Feliz 3]
THE MITCHELLS VS. THE MACHINES (Mark Mothersbaugh) [Aero]
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Leonard Rosenman), HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL! [New Beverly]
SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (Nacio Herb Brown, Lennie Hayton) [New Beverly]
SKATETOWN, U.S.A (Miles Goodman) [Los Feliz 3]
WHITE PEOPLE (Teddy Castellucci) [Fairfax Cinema]

September 19
ADAPTATION (Carter Burwell) [Fairfax Cinema]
BARB & STAR GO TO VISTA DEL MAR (Christopher Lennertz, Dara Taylor) [Alamo Drafthouse]
BRIGHT FUTURE (Pacific 231) [Los Feliz 3]
CHUNGKING EXPRESS (Frankie Chan, Michael Galasso, Roel A. Garcia) [Los Feliz 3]
FLATLINERS (James Newton Howard) [Los Feliz 3]
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE (Michael Galasso, Shigeru Umebayashi), THE HAND [Aero]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [IPIC Westwood]
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (Walter Schumann) [Los Feliz 3]
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Leonard Rosenman), HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL! [New Beverly]
SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (Nacio Herb Brown, Lennie Hayton) [New Beverly]
WANDA (Don Mullaney) [Aero]
THE WICKER MAN (Paul Giovanni) [Fairfax Cinema]
THE WICKER MAN (Angelo Badalementi) [Fairfax Cinema]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard: Son of a Lion (Brown), The Secret World of Arrietty (Corbel), Legion: Season Two (Russo), Driver X (Haydn), The Film & Television Music of Angela Morley (Morley), Watermelon Cookies: The Film Music of Zoe Poledouris-Roche (Poledouris-Roche)

Read: Picture, by Lillian Ross

Seen: Sunset Blvd., What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, Respect, A Star Is Born [1954], The List of Adrian Messenger, Together

Watched: The Magnetic Monster; Mahanagar (The Big City); Charulata (The Lonely Wife); Nayak (The Hero); Quantum of Solace; The Gotham Rhythm Boys [1929]; The Good Place ("Jason Mendoza," "Category 55 Emergency Doomsday Crisis"); Poor Aubrey [1930]

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Today in Film Score History:
September 19
Alfred Newman begins recording his score for How Green Was My Valley (1941)
Arthur Benjamin born (1893)
Daniel Lanois born (1951)
Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “The Search - Part 1” (1994)
Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Powder (1995)
Joel McNeely wins the Emmy for The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Young Indiana Jones and the Scandal of 1920;” Dennis McCarthy wins for his Star Trek: Deep Space Nine main title theme (1993)
Johann Johannsson born (1969)
Johnny Harris begins recording his score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “Planet of the Slave Girls” (1979)
Nile Rodgers born (1952)
Paul Williams born (1940)
Vladimir Horunzhy born (1949)
Willie Hutch died (2005)
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