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We are going to examine the many scores of the science-fiction television series derived from the 1968 feature film Planet Of The Apes, composed by a quartet of artisans (leading maestro Lalo Schifrin followed by Earle Hagen, Richard LaSalle and 20th Century Fox music supervisor Lionel Newman) in 1974, by comparing the original recording and the actual music used and heard in the scenes of the series. It’s a music editor exercice and the tools of the trade are: the soundtrack CD (La-La Land Records, LLLCD 1336, 2015, Disc 1: 58 minutes 51 • Disc 2: 68 minutes 15, Disc 1: 50 tracks • Disc 2: 62 tracks, Limited Edition: 2.000 units, Liner Notes by Jeff Bond) and the DVD of the series (20th Century Fox, 644 minutes, Full Frame, 2001, English and French Languages, English and Spanish Subtitles, Scene Selection).
 
THE·COMPOSERS
 
Lalo·Schifrin
Two scores (“Escape from Tomorrow” and, especially, “The Good Seeds”) by Lalo Schifrin are an outgrowth of a Mission: Impossible score entitled “Submarine” (air date: January 16, 1970)—a powerful martial score foreshadowing the hectic and suspenseful side of Kelly's Heroes (release date: June 23, 1970)—and for the sake of the comparison, just replace the Eastern German police from “Submarine” by the gorillas mounted patrol. Some tracks from Schifrin’s Apes scores clearly follow the same MMM (Modern Military Minimalism) dominated by an extensive use of harp, strings, cimbalom, electric organ (Yamaha E-3 Electone), drum effects, fat brass section and low end piano. In the liner notes and on page 10, we learn that prior to Rosenman, Schifrin was asked to write the music for the second Apes feature film (Beneath The Planet of the Apes) but couldn’t do it because of a 1970 commission. Imagine for a moment a compromise of the experimental side of Mission: Impossible transposed into the Apes realm that I call Mission: Apes. In 1976, Schifrin will rework the Apes Urgency motif in a slower way for the 20th Century Fox actioner Sky Riders: see "The Riders" (from 05:22 to 05:49), "The Terrorists" (from 00:00 to 00:50).
 
 
The pilot score “Escape from Tomorrow” is acid and iron martial gorilla music with a touch of the bizarre (see “Spaceship” that highlights layers of sounds—produced by harp, vibraphone, flute—and ends up with the buzzing Yamaha organ a la “First Escape” from THX 1138 [release date: March 11, 1971]). Find a tight suspenseful violin-laden cue (from 00:11 to 01:46) in the track “Minefield” from Kelly's Heroes that is reworked in both the 1971 television score “Encore” from Mission: Impossible and in “Escape from Tomorrow”: see “Urko and Galen”, from 03:15 to 03:40.
 
The second score “The Gladiators” is divided in three directions: the sweet flute-oriented human side (“Wooden Area”, “Jason”—second part only—, “The Disc”, “A Beginning”), the percussion-oriented bestial game (“Brutal Fight”, “The Arena” featuring bare primitive drum rolls, “Wrestling in the Arena”) and the abstract and totalitarian apes (“Trouble with Apes”, “Planet of the Apes Mountains”, “Human Vs. Apes”—this arch-martial track contains the same intense arrangements from “Ringerman’s Chase” in the film score Coogan’s Bluff (release date: October 2, 1968). The buzzing organ sneaks into “Planet of the Apes Mountains”.
 
The last score “The Good Seeds” is the pinnacle of the Apes’ brutal style that is encapsulated in the dry crazy “Central City” (recycled in the pilot) but the score is slightly counterbalanced by a peaceful farmer leaning (“Plowing”, “Polar”, “Zanties”, “Virdon”—first part only—, “Twin Bulls”—first part only). Still in that blunt force score, Schifrin pays tribute to Rosenman’s Beneath The Planet of the Apes in the hardcore military apes march derived from “Off to War” and “Apes Soldiers Advancing” that you find in the series mounted patrol tracks “Riding for Urko”, “Travel Without Stars”, “Local Patrol” and “We Ride”—by sheer coincidence, both the second Apes feature film and the series highlight a gorilla general (Ursus, Urko). The extented version of “Riding for Urko” has again the intense arrangements from “Ringerman’s Chase” in the film score Coogan’s Bluff. The buzzing organ comes back full force in “Travel Without Stars”, “Local Patrol”, “I’ve Seen Him Before”, “We Ride”, “Discovered”.
 
 
Amongst Schifrin’s “modernistic” devices, find the following ones: the dissonant buzzing electric organ initiated in THX 1138, the weird ARP and Moog synthesizers, the echoplexed instruments, the Hungarian cibalom, minimalistic use of exotic instruments (from Brazil, Cuba, Indonesia), the suspense trick (harp and violin combo with pizzicato effect), the hard fisted strokes on a low register piano.
 
 
Earle·Hagen
After Schifrin’s masterful input, Hagen’s trio of scores are uniformally good and inspired. The first score (“The Legacy”) is rather faithful to the hard edge spirit of Schifrin’s Apes sound but it’s the companion piece to LaSalle’s “The Trap” and it also contains lovely or tender music to illustrate the surroundings of the three fugitives (the hills in “Country Style”, the ravaged Oakland in “Ruined City”) and astronaut Alan Virdon’s surrogate family: a treacherous hungry kid on the payroll for the gorillas and a poor woman cooking (“The Kid”, “Virdon and The Kid”, “The Family”, “The Kid’s Toy”, “Kids and Apes”—first part only—, “Farm Girl”, “Apes and Kids”—second part only).
 
The most poetic and ethereal score remains the unreleased “Tomorrow’s Tide” with its strange pagan fisherman feel (“The Village”—a lowkey moody track that is constantly recycled to depict human villages—, “Gato Leaves”, “Escape”) and evocative “atmospheric underwater music”: see “The Shark”, “Sharks”. Oddly enough, the composer fashions some corrida music for the aquatic ordeal: see “Fire and Fish”, “More Fine Divers”, “Peter Dives”. The main theme is upbeat, sunny and pastoral: see “Runners”, “Run Off”.
 
Earle Hagen’s mini score for “The Surgeon” is fantastic, creepy, uncanny and experimental because of the instruments’ use (scrapped cymbals and cuika, modulator and occilator, synthesizers, electric organ, hand percussions) and consists of two tracks only.
 
 
Richard·LaSalle
The next unreleased score “The Trap” is a homage to Jerry Goldsmith’s Planet of the Apes, especially in tracks like “Through The Forest” (a rework of Goldsmith’s “No Escape” that depicts the way to the human village of Numai) and “Hunted”—that both features vibraslap and guiro combined with echoplexed instruments—and “Stalk in the City” (a rework of Goldsmith’s “New Identity”) and “The Bag”. There is a recursive echoplexed harp gimmick all over.
 
The 8 tracks score “The Deception” is delicate dreamlike melancholic music dedicated to a blind farmer female ape that is declined through a variation of a character theme (“Farna Theme”) that refer to Goldsmith’s “The Revelation” (the last intimistic part) from Planet of the Apes and Herrmann’s Vertigo because of the dominating harp and woodwinds. The score is also blended in the finished episode with Schifrin’s aggressive tracks from “Escape from Tomorrow” and “The Good Seeds” that depict the criminal deeds of a masked apes’ militia. The Farna Theme is tracked once in “The Liberator” during an intimate human family meeting.
 
 
Lionel·Newman
Newman’s 4 tracks score for “The Interrogation” is a caleidoscope of mood/source music from easy listening (see “Again” as a counterpoint) to bare instruments performances, mostly percussions. Newman’s most experimental and far out track remains “Drums and Bells” fashioned for the brainwashing (a silver reflector and loud percussions) of astronaut Pete Burke who exclaims: “All those bells and drums are too loud. They’re deafening me”. As in the previous two mini scores, the story revolves again around a female ape and, here, a psychologist-torturer hence the austere music but one key scene uses two tracks back-to-back: “Again”—Pete Burke dreams of his girlfriend, lying in the meadow—and “Mish Mosh”—Pete Burke awakes and rejects the kiss of the female ape scientist posing as his girlfriend. The music supervisor even tracks Earle Hagen’s “The Surgeon” just before “Again”. Stock music-wise, the track “Drums and Bells” is perfectly recycled in the human sacrifice in the temple scene from the episode “The Liberator”.
 
 
KEY·APES·TRACKS
Some Schifrin’s tracks are over-used by the music supervisor and generally are signal cues for a gorilla soldiers mounted patrol: from “Escape from Tomorrow”, one single piece is noticeable “Apes Urgency” and from “The Good Seeds”, you find “Riding for Urko”—the most tracked piece of aggressive apes music, according to Jeff Bond on page 16—, “Travel Without Stars”, “Local Patrol”, “Apes Neutral Suspense”—a sneaky signal track dominated by Gamelan metallophone percussions and tense strings and used when one of the fugitive characters sense the arrival of a gorillas patrol; the signal returns in “Wind Mill”—, “We Ride”, “The Riding Enemy”, “Hunting Bonded Humans”. “The Soldiers”—a tribute to Schifrin’s “Apes Urgency” from “Escape from Tomorrow”—and “Apes Signals” from Earle Hagen’s “The Legacy” are other typical gorilla soldiers pieces.
 
 
The most iconic distorted piece remain “Reflections” from Richard LaSalle’s “The Trap” that is the template for signal cues that Jeff Bond describes as “the echoplex effects along with a descending tone from water drop bars to characterize the glint of the signaling reflector in use by the apes”. Hagen’s answer to LaSalle’s “Reflections” becomes “Ape Signals”—first part only—from “The Legacy” but keep in mind that Schifrin previously provides “Planet of the Apes Mountains”—first part only—from “The Gladiators”.
 
 
“The echoplex effects along with a descending tone from water drop bars to characterize the glint of the signaling reflector in use by the apes”.
About the track "Reflections" by Richard LaSalle.
 
 
 
The leading ape characters have their specific music: renegade Galen (“Urko and Galen” from “Escape from Tomorrow”), General Urko (“Riding for Urko” from “The Gladiators” and Hagen’s answer becomes “Apes Signals”—second part only—from “The Legacy”, “Urko” from “The Legacy”), scientist Zaius (“Prison Cell/Zaius” from “Escape from Tomorrow”).
 
COMPARATIVE·STUDY
 
Intrada·Edition [2005]
Two onscreen credits scores are omitted: Richard LaSalle’s “The Trap” and Earle Hagen’s “Tomorrow’s Tide”. The tracks are suites. The booklet doesn’t mention any hints of musical informations: an oddity. The only added value is in track #31 entitled “End Titles” that features the 20th Century Fox anthem at 00:29 followed by a man talking to a musican and a laconic solo of primitive horn from 00:54 to 01:57 (include in “The Gladiators” when a human villager plays to announce the game).
 
 
La-La Land·Edition [2015]
All the six onscreen credits scores are available combined with three uncredited mini scores or partial scores—these three mavericks have the generic onscreen credits “Music Supervision Lionel Newman”. All Lalo Schifrin’s scores, especially “The Good Seeds”—with more than five minutes—, and Earle Hagen’s “The Legacy” feature new and longer materials and alternate mixes: Intrada and La-La Land timings for “Escape from Tomorrow” are INT19:01 against LLL19:59, for “The Gladiators” are INT16:28 against LLL16:40, for “The Good Seeds” are INT13:16 against LLL18:18 and, lastly, for “The Legacy” are INT16:36 against LLL17:05.
 
And the sherry on top of the cake remains the two versions of the cult heavy martial “Riding with Urko” (one from the score, lasting 01:48, and one extented, lasting 01:55). The liner notes by Jeff Bond is a vast improvement and provides a wide array of musical descriptions and therefore allow people to gain an understanding of the complex mechanism of composition. The track titles have been modified: for instance, from “Escape from Tomorrow”, the track “Apes” (02:48) in 2005 turns into “Apes Urgency” (01:31) in 2015 because they have separated the cues instead of the previous suite and it means that “Apes” combines two cues (“Apes Urgency” and “Concealment”). This cue by cue listing from LLL is much more realistic and relevant.
 
Notes
For the anecdote, the label offers the list of musicians classified by the families of instruments and, as usual in most liner notes, some families of instruments would deserve to be carefully detailed: for instance Percussions and Keyboards which lead the peculiar identity of this unconventional music. Furthermore, a deep analysis on the achieved sound devices should be fully explained in that particular decade of musical composition: the subversive seventies.
 
Footnotes
INT stands for the label Intrada.
LLL stands for the label La-La Land.
 

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Well done write up, Thomas. While I haven't seen the series in decades, it would be fun to follow the re-used music as it reappears in the series (and of course, how it aids the images onscreen) I know my own appreciation of this series is largely because of the music and yes, even the creative way cues were recycled; something that many shows of this time did.

I like the comparison with scores done for Mission: Impossible ("a compromise of the experimental side of Mission: Impossible transposed into the Apes realm") during that same time period. The 1970-75 era is special and so much exceptional music was done for TV during that time. I suppose their coming to TV had to do with the fear and reality that composers believed their days were numbered in film because of the rise of pop/rock-song soundtracks.

It's interesting to learn of Schifrin's nod to Rosenman and LaSalle's rework of Goldsmith's material. I really need to watch this series (and hear it) through my (aging) adult eyes to fully appreciate everything going on.

It's great to see this appreciation for scoring like this. I tried to re-watch the series after the LLL set came out to hear this wonderful music in context but I failed. The show is simply not worth the time. Better to spend it listening to this inventive and colorful music.

It's great to see this appreciation for scoring like this. I tried to re-watch the series after the LLL set came out to hear this wonderful music in context but I failed. The show is simply not worth the time. Better to spend it listening to this inventive and colorful music.

The same for me. I actually ended up selling my DVD set. The scores are the best thing about the series and kudos to Thomas for writing this great accompaniment piece.

I really need to watch this series (and hear it) through my (aging) adult eyes to fully appreciate everything going on.

Close to the end of his life, Roddy McDowall said that the TV series was "ill-conceived." He said nothing more, and was thus being kind. For those that would seek out the TV series, I can only paraphrase Dr. Zaius from the original film, "Don't look for it; you may not like what you find."

For me personally, watching the TV show (and some parts of the sequels) is like sitting down to view the Tim Burton remake -- a masochistic exercise.

In the world of Fox's APES franchise, BEWARE EVERYTHING AFTER THE ORIGINAL!

I really need to watch this series (and hear it) through my (aging) adult eyes to fully appreciate everything going on.

Close to the end of his life, Roddy McDowall said that the TV series was "ill-conceived." He said nothing more, and was thus being kind. For those that would seek out the TV series, I can only paraphrase Dr. Zaius from the original film, "Don't look for it; you may not like what you find."

For me personally, watching the TV show (and some parts of the sequels) is like sitting down to view the Tim Burton remake -- a masochistic exercise.

In the world of Fox's APES franchise, BEWARE EVERYTHING AFTER THE ORIGINAL!


Yeah I remember when it originally aired. I found it unwatchable even back then. Saw maybe a few episodes at best. And this is someone that ate up the Apes franchise including the animated version. (Same with Logan's Run television series)

Close to the end of his life, Roddy McDowall said that the TV series was "ill-conceived." He said nothing more, and was thus being kind. For those that would seek out the TV series, I can only paraphrase Dr. Zaius from the original film, "Don't look for it; you may not like what you find."

For me personally, watching the TV show (and some parts of the sequels) is like sitting down to view the Tim Burton remake -- a masochistic exercise.

In the world of Fox's APES franchise, BEWARE EVERYTHING AFTER THE ORIGINAL!


I have some memories of the series in that some episodes were cobbled together and presented as TV movies Life, Liberty and Pursuit on the Planet of the Apes or titles of that sort. I recall the one where Burke--that was Naughton, right? Was trapped with Urko(?; Mark Lenard) in an abandoned city building and having to work together to get out. There was a horse race with the gorillas attempting to sabotage it and the humans having to stop them; the one where the human built a glider...I was about eleven or twelve when I saw them. They aired each night on the local independent channel and I awaited each one with barely-contained excitement. Perhaps it's best to just to hang on to the fond memory and not spoil it by going back.

Still, I would like to hear the music in context. After all, I am one who has those Power Records stories largely memorized. :cool:

PLANET OF THE APES POWER RECORDS
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9bz7A12fB8[/youtube]


BENEATH POTA (but for heaven's sake, don't click till you've finished the first one! MASSIVE SPOILER!]
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AviKPjH_jNc[/youtube]

I merely remember the series being a little routine, like a lesser western series. As a kid, like many others I loved it. And it caused double bills of the movies to be rushed into the cinemas which I readily took advantage of. There were also reenactments at live events featuring folks in ape outfits.

In the UK I seem to recall it being a hit, and aired on Sunday evenings on ITV, and was somewhat surprised when I read in an American magazine that it had flopped. I thought I read it only lasted a few episodes at peak time before ending up on weekday afternoons whilst still on first run. Marvel cannibalized it's US Apes comic magazine into a British weekly, and there were knitted Galen jumpers (sweaters) doing the rounds!

But nothing lingers in the memory better than being in (my nearest town) Barnsley market one Saturday afternoon. Some stall holder was having a walkabout with a tray around his neck selling Galen glove puppets shouting "come and get yer Galens!"

Surely a bigger indignity for Mr McDowall than a short lived routine show.

I merely remember the series being a little routine, like a lesser western series.

It's actually on a par with all the 20th Century-Fox Sci-Fi TV shows of that era, mostly produced by Irwin Allen, which is to say that it's entirely for kids under the age of fifteen. Viewed now as an adult, the show's biggest sin is that it's dull. I had turned fifteen three months before before the APES TV show premiered in the US in September 1974, but I guess I was still too old for it because I was disappointed with it from the very first episode. In fact, it depressed me because it wasn't "adult" enough, but then my favorite scene in the original movie is the courtroom scene. I've always been more interested in the APES concept as political satire, rather than the action/adventure aspects of men being hunted by apes on horseback. There's nothing wrong with enjoying APES just for its "violence," but it only goes so far. It's pretty crappy if that's all there is, which is why the Burton movie was such a disaster. The TV series did attempt some political satire, but it was hobbled by being aimed mostly at kids who wouldn't get it for the most part.

Here's a quick way to get caught up on the series...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNKjCxaxjS4[/youtube]

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