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 Posted:   Oct 9, 2020 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

What did you think of Bergman's use of color in C&W (or Whispers and Cries, as Bergman authority John Simon thought should be the title's proper translation)?

Visually, the cinematography and set design were obviously striking and set up the atmosphere. It's just that I don't go in for "sledgehammer symbolism", but that's my baggage. However, I still appreciated the "journey" as I made my way through the film. I can't praise the performances enough. Harriet Andersson is on my shortlist of greatest-ever actors.

I get the sense that my appreciation of C&W--as opposed to "enjoyment"--will continue to grow.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2020 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

What did you think of Bergman's use of color in C&W (or Whispers and Cries, as Bergman authority John Simon thought should be the title's proper translation)?

Visually, the cinematography and set design were obviously striking and set up the atmosphere. It's just that I don't go in for "sledgehammer symbolism", but that's my baggage. However, I still appreciated the "journey" as I made my way through the film. I can't praise the performances enough. Harriet Andersson is on my shortlist of greatest-ever actors.

I get the sense that my appreciation of C&W--as opposed to "enjoyment"--will continue to grow.


I like the fades to red - quite startling.

I perversely prefer 1970s Bergman's offbeat films (like The Serpent's Egg with its weird blend of Berlin decadence with science fiction and action movie elements) and From the Life of the Marionettes (with its Fassbinder-ish mood and its end credits set to electronic dance music. Techno beats in a Bergman film??!!) to his more "regular" Bergman stuff like C&W and Autumn Sonata.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2020 - 2:33 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I watched The Serpent's Egg back in July or August, but I need to watch it again before commenting; I really enjoyed it, though.

 
 Posted:   Oct 9, 2020 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Guess I'll watch Cries & Whispers again this weekend.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2020 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Bergman Unpublished: Style

There are several clips by Marie Nyreröd presumably taken from the longer cut of her Bergman Island documentary, which is sadly not the one on the Criterion box.

This video is not about Bergman's cinematic style, but rather his style of clothing and how it changed--or hadn't--over the years. Most FSMers would dress like Bergman, had it not been for the invention of Star Wars t-shirts and jeans.



While the longer cut of Bergman's Island is not included on Criterion's Bergman box, the Unpublished featurettes are on the Criterion box's "Additional Supplements" disc under the title 17 Short Stories; it runs 70 minutes.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2020 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Making my way once again through the Criterion box's "Additional Supplements" disc. The South Bank Show with presenter Melvyn Bragg includes a 1978 interview with Bergman, who was always an engaging interview subject. It's charming that Bergman "directs" those who interview him, but he always gives himself enthusiastically to the interview. Melvyn Bragg--whom I remember from some vintage Dr Who bonus features--isn't exactly a "hard-hitting" interviewer, but he is still miles ahead of any "well-regarded" interviewer today; Bragg allows his interview subject to speak, which almost never happens with the dopes of today.

 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2020 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

This was also posted in the "Current Favorite Cheese" thread, but it really belongs here:

As if I needed yet another reason to think highly of Ingmar Bergman:

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2020 - 3:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

If only Ingmar Bergman had directed Star Wars, then every FSMer would be enthusiastically discussing his work.

"If only..."

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2020 - 7:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

1996 was also the year I watched my first Bergman film (The Seventh Seal).

How do you remember something like that?


In his interview on The Seventh Seal bonus features, critic Peter Cowie says that many people can remember the first time they saw the film, so my experience--for once--isn't a solitary one. Cowie even compares the vividness of the memory to those (old enough) to say where they were when President John F. Kennedy was shot(!).

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2020 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

If only Ingmar Bergman had directed Star Wars, then every FSMer would be enthusiastically discussing his work.

"If only..."


Amusingly, Bergman's film from 1977, The Serpent's Egg, contains some science fiction elements. So why aren't we getting Serpent's Egg: The Reboot these days?

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2020 - 8:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Amusingly, Bergman's film from 1977, The Serpent's Egg, contains some science fiction elements. So why aren't we getting Serpent's Egg: The Reboot these days?

I liked the film a lot more than I was led to believe I would. wink Obviously, I loved the film's Weimar setting, the cold, wet weather, the shitty surroundings, Liv Ullmann as a nightclub entertainer, and the creepy Kafkaesque government apparatus. It really didn't feel much like Bergman, though his trademark touches and themes will no doubt be more obvious to me the next time I watch it.

 
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