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 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 3:10 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

A friend mine recently asked me to recommend 10 score albums by 10 different film composers, and it struck me as a fun challenge that I thought would be of interest here as well.

So here are the rules:

1. Using ten of your favourite composers, pick ONE album each that you want to represent said composer
2. One and ONLY ONE soundtrack album pr. composer
3. No combo albums or compilations or runner-ups allowed!
4. Feel free to choose personal favourites, not necessarily the most important or famous score by said composer
5. Feel free to add one single sentence about why you've chosen that score so that it's not just an anonymous list
6. Please note that we're talking soundtrack ALBUMS here, not necessarily how the score worked in the movie

Here are mine:

1. John Williams - JURASSIC PARK

Goosebumping awe & wonder, some suspense stuff and some excellent action music all combined into one of my alltime favourites.

2. Danny Elfman - EDWARD SCISSORHANDS

More awe & wonder with a christmassy feel. It goes straight to the emotional core.

3. Elliot Goldenthal - FINAL FANTASY: THE SPIRITS WITHIN

Normally a bit too bombastic for my taste these days, but has a massive scope in mood and styles.

4. Hans Zimmer - BEYOND RANGOON

Zimmer is best when he's in ethnic mode, and this is his most gorgeous of those.

5. Jerry Goldsmith - THE MUMMY

I love the meeting of arabic orchestrations and full-scale orchestra in a lush tonal language.

6. James Horner - AVATAR

Yeah, it has bowled me over; the adventure, the heart, the excitement.

7. James Newton Howard - WATERWORLD

It has everything - heroic action music, ethereal synths, exotic stuff, romance, religious sound.

8. Alan Silvestri - THE ABYSS

One of my alltime favs, mostly because of the majestic music towards the end

9. Basil Poledouris - CONAN THE BARBARIAN

A no-brainer.

10. Elmer Bernstein - TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

Childlike perception through music - from innocence to horror.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 3:34 AM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

John Barry - "Dances With Wolves"
Elmer Bernstein - "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Jerry Goldsmith - "First Knight"
Michael Kamen - "Mr. Holland's Opus"
Erich Wolfgang Korngold - "The Adventures of Robin Hood"
Alex North - "A Streetcar Named Desire"
Miklos Rozsa - "El Cid"
Max Steiner - "Adventures of Don Juan"
Franz Waxman - "Sunset Boulevard"
John Williams - "Memoirs of a Geisha"

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 3:43 AM   
 By:   diachenko   (Member)

In no particular order:

1. Hans Zimmer: Angels & Demons

Wonderful score overall, but the first track "BPM 160" is one of my favorite tracks of any score: the energy, drive, and menace are just fantastic.

2. James Newton Howard: Dinosaur

This was really hard to narrow down, but this remains my favorite Newton Howard score. Full of wonderful melodies, moods, and top-notch orchestration.

3. John Debney: Cutthroat Island

Super action/adventure swashbuckler score with more than a nod back to classic Williams and Korngold.

4. Trevor Rabin: Deep Blue Sea

A score that shows off Rabin's two trademarks-epic, soaring themes and pulsing, rock-driven action.

5. John Powell: How to Train Your Dragon

Another hard one to narrow down, but this new score by Powell has just blown me away. It's beautiful, powerful, and just plain fun.

6. Richard Harvey: The Great Within

Richard Harvey is sadly not very well known in the USA, but he is a fantastic composer, and this is one of his best, a wonderful blending of Western and Eastern themes and instrumentations. Plus, Harvey is one of the best orchestrators I've ever heard.

7. Harry Gregson-Williams: Sinbad-Legend of the Seven Seas

This score is the epitome of big, fun, epic music.

8. Howard Shore: Lord of the Rings (complete)

What can I say? This achievement is just staggering. There are so many highlights, but "The Lighting of the Beacons" is tops for me.

9. Basil Poledouris: For Love of the Game

If only for the opening track (though it's all good), one of the most beautiful themes ever written.

10. Thomas Newman: Oscar and Lucinda

Gorgeous, gorgeous score, with superb orchestration, and breathtaking themes.

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 3:47 AM   
 By:   MattyO   (Member)

1. The Empire Strikes Back - John Williams
2. Independence Day - David Arnold
3. Alice In Wonderland - Danny Elfman
4. CutThroat Island - John Debney
5. The Boys From Brazil - Jerry Goldsmith
6. The Legend of Zorro - James Horner
7. How To Train Your Dragon - John Powell
8. Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End - Hans Zimmer
9. El Cid - Miklos Rozsa
10. Back To The Future - Alan Silvestri

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 3:47 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

1. Ennio Morricone – ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST
Not his most inventive score, but the ultimate musical oil painting of the Maestro. Showcases his versatility nevertheless with no less than five distinct themes for the five main characters.

2. John Barry – ON HER MAJESTY'S SECRET SERVICE
It shows both sides Barry excelled in – romance and action. Big, bold, fun and melancholic and tender.

3. John Williams – THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
Includes two of his best themes from Star Wars (which his name is synonymous to in my ears). Preferably a 1CD release because someone not familiar with it will never learn to love it when starting on the 2CD version.

4. Jerry Goldsmith – UNDER FIRE
Not the most representative of his works, but catchy, rhythmic and appropriate for the picture it was made for. Risk: It feels dated to some.

5. John Powell – THE BOURNE SUPREMACY
To me, the very definition of a contemporary melancholic and yet propulsive urban soundtrack. Best soundtrack album listening experience of the 2000s.

6. Harry Gregson-Williams – SPY GAME
Modern versatility. Rich and melodic.

7. Bill Conti – ROCKY
One of the great film music classics of all time vastly contempted by the film music community. Needs no explanation to enjoy by anyone else outside the film music community.

8. Wojciech Kilar – THE NINTH GATE
Hypnotic.

9. Christian Bruhn – CAPTAIN FUTURE
Perhaps the best example of 1980s animation TV music. Similar risk as with Under Fire.

10. Charles Bernstein – MR. MAJESTYK
1970s film music at its best and a perfect example of how good film music can be even with a very limited ensemble.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Barry - The Last Valley

Goldsmith - In Like Flint

Herrmann - Journey To The Centre Of The Earth

Bernstein - The Comacheros

Korngold - The Sea Hawk

Morricone - Giu La Testa

Rozsa - Knights Of The Round Table

Moross - The War Lord

Newman - The Robe

Addison - Tom Jones

I'd be very happy with that little lot (in fact I am!).

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 5:35 AM   
 By:   tobid   (Member)

1.) David Arnold - The Musketeer

Wonderful themes and thrilling action sequences… a classic Arnold. I could have chosen ID4 too, but Musketeer is extremely underrated, so I went with this.

2.) Bernard Herrmann - The 7th Voyage of Sinbad

It takes only two seconds to remind me what a brilliant score this is

3.) Lee Holdridge - The Mists of Avalon

Creates a wonderful dreamy atmosphere

4.) James Horner - Legends of the Fall

Beautiful and powerful at the same time

5.) Trevor Jones - Aegis

An exciting score with everything that makes Jones’ scores so great

6.) Mark McKenzie - Blizzard

One of the few Christmas scores that I also enjoy in summer

7.) Javier Navarrete - Pan’s Labyrinth

My favourite score ever. Enough said.

8.) Alex North - I’ll Cry Tomorrow

It’s almost impossible to pick one single favourite score by North, so I mainly chose this because the FSM release works so great with the score and songs put together

9.) Franz Waxman - Taras Bulba

Even Bernard Herrmann called this the score of a lifetime. What else can I add?

10.) John Williams - The Empire Strikes Back

Flows perfectly even in its complete form

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:01 AM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

It was really hard but I finally choose these ones:

RANDY EDELMAN - THE MASK

DAVID MICHAEL FRANK - BEST OF THE BEST 2

JERRY GOLDSMITH - BASIC INSTINCT

JOEL GOLDSMITH - MOON 44

JAMES NEWTON HOWARD - WATERWORLD

MARK MANCINA - SPEED

HARRY MANFREDINI - ACES: IRON EAGLE 3

JOHN OTTMAN - LAKE PLACID

JOHN SCOTT - LIONHEART

JOHN WILLIAMS - SLEEPERS

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:24 AM   
 By:   David Kessler   (Member)

Well, I took Thors composers and chose my own fave soundtracks of those (I also kept some of Thors notes and added a few of my own too)

Here are mine:

1. John Williams - JAWS

Goosebumping awe & wonder, some suspense stuff and some excellent action music all combined into one of my alltime favourites.

2. Danny Elfman - BATMAN
More awe & wonder with a fantasyfeel. It goes straight to the emotional core.

3. Elliot Goldenthal - ALIEN 3

Very bombastic and has a massive scope in mood and styles.

4. Hans Zimmer - BACKDRAFT

Zimmer is best when he's in bombastic mood, and this is his most gorgeous of those.

5. Jerry Goldsmith - TOTAL RECALL

Can it be better??????????

6. James Horner - 48:HRS

What is there to say?? Play it loud smile

7. James Newton Howard - SIGNS

Emotional. eerie, moody Love it...

8. Alan Silvestri - BACK TO THE FUTURE

You become it with the music and goes back in time with it

9. Basil Poledouris - CONAN THE BARBARIAN

A no-brainer.

10. Elmer Bernstein - AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON

Sad that there isnt more music of this - from comic to horror.

 
 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:34 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

4. Hans Zimmer - BACKDRAFT

Zimmer is best when he's in bombastic mood, and this is his most gorgeous of those.


He, he...."gorgeous bombasticism", now there's a new term.

 
 Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

So here are the rules:

1. Using ten of your favourite composers, pick ONE album each that you want to represent said composer
2. One and ONLY ONE soundtrack album pr. composer
3. No combo albums or compilations or runner-ups allowed!
4. Feel free to choose personal favourites, not necessarily the most important or famous score by said composer
5. Feel free to add one single sentence about why you've chosen that score so that it's not just an anonymous list
6. Please note that we're talking soundtrack ALBUMS here, not necessarily how the score worked in the movie


  • "Battle Of The Bulge" (1965) by Benjamin Frankel was issued on Warner Bros LP, re-issued on a Japanese Soundtrack Club CD, and re-recorded with about twice as much music on the German CPO label; whichever album you listen to, one hears a masterwork from the first composer in the British film industry to utilize serial atonal techniques.

  • "Bunny Lake Is Missing" (1965) by Paul Glass can be heard only on the RCA Victor LP, but it's a masterly blend of a tonal lullaby for the absent child juxtaposed with fierce dissonances indicating all the eccentric adults and situations revolving around her disappearance (we'll have to forgive the intrusion of the 3 vocals from "The Zombies" which are also on the album).

  • "Fantastic Voyage" (1966) by Leonard Rosenman, is perhaps the best example of this composer's unique sound world, which he first introduced in the mid-'50s by incorporating serial atonal methods when no others were doing so.

  • "Africa" (1967) by Alex North. Although this is not a film, I feel this represents Mr. North's greatest achievement into the realm of contemporary concert music: he composed a 4-movement symphony based upon material he wrote for this television special.

  • "Ulysses" (1967) by Stanley Myers is available only as an LP on RCA Victor, but what an album it is - a potpourri of themes bunched together and distorted in a Charles Ives fashion.

  • "The Illustrated Man" (1969) by Jerry Goldsmith. My favorite Goldsmith score, which demonstrates all that he was capable of: lyricism, economy, atonal music, bizarre instrumental combinations, much else...

  • "Blood From The Mummy's Tomb" (1971) by Tristram Cary. This is one of the rare Hammer Film scores to have been issued on CD, and it is also one of their best: Ancient Egypt is colorfully evoked amidst the blood-n-thunder!

  • "The Mechanic" (1972) by Jerry Fielding is another highpoint in the music of cinema achieving, as it does, a post-modern sound world that not only reflects the harsh dog-eat-dog environment seen in the film, but can stand up quite well on its own in a concert hall performance.

  • "L'Imprecateur" (1977) by Richard Rodney Bennett is another album that is not available in digital format (being issued on a French LP), but its atonal music communicates a cold/icy detatched feeling to the proceedings (I have never seen the film, but it seems to be set in law firms/courtrooms of the skyscrapers in a metropolitan city).

  • "Danton" (1982) by Jean Prodromides is challenging and uncompromising music, one of the last gasps of contemporary classical music in cinema (although the recent CD of this combines to short EPs, the original LP features only music from "Danton")

  •  
     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:46 AM   
     By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

    Sounds fun!

    1. Goldsmith - ISLANDS IN THE STREAM (FSM CD)
    2. North - CLEOPATRA (Varese CDs)
    3. Rosenthal - BECKET (Intrada CD)
    4. Williams - CE3K (1998 CD version)
    5. Howard - SIGNS
    6. Fielding - LAWMAN
    7. Bernstein - HAWAII (Varese CDs)
    8. Morricone - GOOD, THE BAD & THE UGLY (original CD)
    9. Poledouris - LONESOME DOVE
    10. Gold - EXODUS

     
     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 6:56 AM   
     By:   Rick15   (Member)

    Danny Elfman: Batman

    John Williams: The Empire Strikes Back

    Jerry Goldsmith: Alien

    James Horner: Star Trek II

    Bill Conti: The Karate Kid

    Alan Silvestri: Back to the Future

    Bruce Broughton: Lost in Space

    James Newton Howard: Signs

    John Powell: Hancock

    Hans Zimmer: The Rock (Oh c'mon!!! We ALL know he had input into the main themes)

    I will get around to adding comments about why later.

    It's really interesting to see the variance in different composers.....

    for example, John Williams - Jurassic Park, CE3K, Sleepers, TESB

    That's a wide variety of styles to showcase one composer.

    Great thread


    Rick

     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 7:14 AM   
     By:   Superman   (Member)

    John Williams - Super Empire Strikes Back Man
    (sorrybig grin, but I would recommend them both)
    these are why music was written.

    Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    it presents the majesty of the written note.

    James Horner - Apollo 13 - The Wrath of Khan
    -beautifully captures the Moon Program(apollo 13).
    -says alot when you can follow up the first one(khan).

    John Barry - King Kong
    a masterpiece.

    Bill Conti - The Right Stuff
    captures the magic of the orbital space programs.

    Basil Poledouris - Conan the Barbarian
    a savage score reaching for honor! I think everybody likes this one.

    Alex North - Dragonslayer
    pure mastery.

    David Shire - The Hindenburg
    "main title" and "up ship" truly capture the miracle of flight.

    Dimitri Tiomkin - The Guns of Navarone
    sublime.

    Leonard Rosenman - Fantastic Voyage
    the score was a fantastic voyage by itself.

    So many more, but alas...

     
     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 7:15 AM   
     By:   Thor   (Member)

    No cheating, Superman! The challenge to narrow it down to one is the whole point of this thread!

     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 7:22 AM   
     By:   Superman   (Member)

    No cheating, Superman! The challenge to narrow it down to one is the whole point of this thread!

    John Williams created many icons. Ask Captain Kirk if he cheated.wink

     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 8:03 AM   
     By:   First Breath   (Member)

    Sylvester Levay - Hot Shots!
    Harold Faltermeyer - Tango & Cash
    Tangerine Dream - Dead Solid Perfect
    Hans Zimmer - Green Card
    Jonathan Elias - Vamp
    Gary Chang - 52 Pick-Up
    Giorgio Moroder - Cat People
    BT - Monster
    Patrick O'Hearn - White Sands
    Christopher Franke - Raven

     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 8:07 AM   
     By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

    1.Bernard Herrmann- Vertigo (followed closely by F451)
    2. Alex North- Spartacus (obviously)
    3. John Williams- Superman (more range of style than Star Wars IMO)
    4. Jerry Goldsmith- Papillon (once again, great range of technique and style- plaintive melodies, awesome action cues, the whole 9 yards)
    5. Akira Ifukube- Gojira (was the ever any doubt?)
    6. Elliot Goldenthal- Cobb (another complete look at a composer's range)
    7. Gabriel Yared- The Talented Mr Ripley (great score- jazz, classical, everything)
    8. James Horner- The Rocketeer (probably his most original and dynamic score for me)
    9. Thomas Newman- The Shawshank Redemption (still an outstanding achievement)
    10. James Newton Howard- Signs (completely awesome)

    Nice thread Thor. I like it!

     
     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 8:23 AM   
     By:   Taylor Fenno   (Member)

    1. Alan Menken - The Little Mermaid

    2. James Horner - Star Trek: The Wrath Of Khan

    3. Jerry Goldsmith - Hoosiers

    4. John Williams - E.T.

    5. John Powell - How To Train Your Dragon

    6. Michael Giacchino - Speed Racer

    7. Nicholas Hooper - Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince

    8. Elmer Bernstein - The Magnificent Seven

    9. Basil Poledouris - Quigley Down Under

    10. Bill Conti - Rocky

    That was kind of tougher than I thought. Many of my favorites didn't make the list...

     
     Posted:   May 15, 2010 - 8:32 AM   
     By:   Superman   (Member)

    Why recommend something to a friend if it wasn't a personal favorite? Wouldn't that be disingenuous or lacking sincerity? How can they become a fan hearing second-rate stuff? Honest question?

     
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