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 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 12:11 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Here's the big kahuna. This is in my opinion Goldsmith's greatest unused cue. The big climax. It's over 10 minutes of non-stop action utilizing all of the major themes he developed up to this point in the film.
There's the heroic theme for the French, a theme for the baddies, the love theme (which is absolutely beautiful) and the "tick-tock" motif for the flash-forwards to the present.

This is without a doubt the most exciting piece he wrote towards the end of his career and it's an absolute travesty that it went unused.

At least you can see how it was meant to work in this clip. I spent many hours mixing this one as best as I could and pinpointing exactly where the beats fit. From putting it together I deduced there were roughly 4 edits made to this scene after he initially scored it. I was able to edit the music discreetly in some places to accommodate for this.

I can't post this one on Youtube because the length is over ten minutes, so it will be exclusive to my Vimeo account.

Enjoy.

Prepare for Battle/Victory For Us/Where's Marek:
https://vimeo.com/347457247

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

That tick-tock motif, as you call it, is the best part of the whole cue. I LOVE that. It's similar in style to the hair-raising end of "Bloody Floor" from Hollow Man.

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   Spinmeister   (Member)

Despite your valiant efforts to place it all in context, this score has simply never registered with me.

It, along with the likes of The Last Castle and Nemesis (and a fair chunk of his 90s output), rank amongst Goldsmith at his least interesting (to me).

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 6:49 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Despite your valiant efforts to place it all in context, this score has simply never registered with me.

It, along with the likes of The Last Castle and Nemesis (and a fair chunk of his 90s output), rank amongst Goldsmith at his least interesting (to me).


That weird synth noise ruined much of the score for me as well, but getting to see the cues in context helps (even though that synth noise still sucks and is completely wrong for the movie).

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 8:02 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

This might Help ....Also I remember Richard Donner saying in a interview that he was wrong about all the re-edits..Studio And Michael Crichton were 100% Pissed off of the Donner Effort...While all this massive junk was happening Jerry Goldsmith was battling Cancer. From IMDB....

The film was originally slated to be released in the fall of 2002, however the studio was not happy with the Richard Donner's cut of the film, which included a prologue explaining the disappearance of the Billy Connolly character in the film and contained Jerry Goldsmith's original score for the film. Donner was then forced to re-cut the film by Paramount and asked Goldsmith to edit down his score to the re-cut version of the film, which also prompted another release date by the studio to March 2003. Paramount, particularly studio head Sherry Lansing, was again unhappy with Donner's second cut of the film that he had delivered which completely had eliminated the Billy Connolly prologue, which was essential to the both the Michael Crichton novel and the film's backstory, which was originally scored by Goldsmith as a cue called "The Dig" and the musical recording slate number of 1M1. Donner was forced to re-cut the film once more and the film was again delayed to unspecified date and again Goldsmith was asked to return to the project. At this point, Goldsmith's health was deteriorating due to cancer and had recently begin to score Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) for his friend Joe Dante, a project which required the assistance of composer John Debney for additional music and would also be his last score as he would pass away on July 28, 2004. Donner really wanted Goldsmith to stay on, but could not for those reasons and liked the score that he had written for the first cut of the film. Paramount then hired composer Brian Tyler, who had written the music for the film, The Hunted (2003), which was released that March in place of Timeline. Tyler would score almost all the identical scenes in which Goldsmith originally scored and each score recorded by both Goldsmith and Tyler are the same length at 74 minutes. The final cut of the film would be 116 minutes from its original 136 min cut, mainly the Billy Connolly prologue clearly absent from re-cut version and the final cut, which proves that the film was clearly interfered with by the studio. Goldsmith's and Tyler's music would be released respectively by Varese Sarabande Records.

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2019 - 8:28 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Interesting. Thanks.

 
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