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 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   Adam.   (Member)

I use the Washington, DC Metrorail system five days a week to get to and from work. Every single day I see at least one person jumping/hopping over the turnstiles without paying. It's always young men doing it. Never women or older folks as far as I've observed. This happens in every major city that has rail systems, of course. They claim to lose millions every year because of this. Big cities such as New York have large metal gate bars to combat this.

A few stations in the DC system are upgrading their entry points to make it more difficult for the freeloaders to get through.

Here is what most entry gates look like. You can easily see how any able-bodied person can step over the orange colored gates (or slide under them) if you're inclined to do such a thing.



The station nearest me recently posted these signs all around to warn jumpers of upcoming changes.



The changes are here. This is what the new gates look like. They open to the side like a door. They even display a warning.."If you intentionally damage the fare gates you will be prosecuted".



There is still enough room at the bottom to slide under I think! Time will tell if this is effective. I'm sure the more athletic jumpers will still try to climb over. LOL. We will see.

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

I should have written my instructional book "The Art of the Jump!", but alas I'm to late.

 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Meanwhile, the small mountain town where I live doesn't even have a traffic light.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2024 - 11:27 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

First reports from DC weren't too promising...




But later, the numbers told the story.....




San Francisco has the same problem, and is going for a even tougher solution...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 12:02 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

That turnstile system feels so outdated now, regardless of how tall the door is.

In Oslo, the subway has no turnstiles at all. People just walk on and off as they please. Ticket is usually purchased via an app, although there are also some "boxes" around for those who still use cards. There are random checks onboard, so if you haven't purchased a ticket, you get a considerable fine if you're caught. So while it's technically easy to dodge the fare, most people won't risk it.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

That turnstile system feels so outdated now, regardless of how tall the door is.

In Oslo, the subway has no no turnstiles at all. People just walk on and off as they please. Ticket is usually purchased via an app, although there are also some "boxes" around for those who still use cards. There are random checks onboard, so if you haven't purchased a ticket, you get a considerable fine if you're caught. So while it's technically easy to dodge the fare, most people won't risk it.



We live in a less law-abiding society, although some municipal transit systems in the U.S. have gone to a gateless model.

Even so, you crafty Norwegians have developed an app for fare evaders--to track where the checks are taking place:

"Billettkonroll for the iPhone is an application that tells you where ticket inspectors are performing controls on public transportation within Norway. This gives you the chance to know about the checks that are in your proximity. The program costs NOK 17, – on the App Store."

https://www.tnp.no/norway/panorama/2188-isneak-into-public-transport-avoid-the-ticket-control-with-iphone-application/#google_vignette

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 1:37 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yeah, I've vaguely heard about that app, but I don't believe it's in much use. Maybe some students and the like. I also wouldn't trust its 100% efficiency.

 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 6:10 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

First reports from DC weren't too promising...



That's hilarious! They should electrify the doors and have an auto off switch only when they're fully open.

I find it kinda odd they showed honest commuters faces who didnt asked to be filmed or put on the internet but blurred out the criminals faces. WTF?! roll eyes

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 7:14 AM   
 By:   TheAvenger   (Member)

When it opened around twenty or so years ago the Hollywood and Highland Metro station used the honor system but it was massively abused. Turnstiles were introduced about 10 years ago.

 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   Adam.   (Member)

I'd like to see the fare jumpers get caught in a box like the AGONY BOOTH from Star Trek. Full duration as Spock said.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 2:54 PM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

Around 12 years ago I received my Freedom Pass, which means I can use any public transport in greater London & any buss in England, all for free. Lovely! And I use the hell out of it, I'm the only one in my family & my dwindling bunch of friends & acquaintances who still uses the buss, they haven't been on one for decades, I don't think my sister has used one since 1970, I'm on & off them every day.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2024 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

First reports from DC weren't too promising...



That's hilarious! They should electrify the doors and have an auto off switch only when they're fully open.


It seems like it's the handicapped (dual) gate that gets abused the most, because it's easier to slip between the double doors than around or over the single door.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 19, 2024 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

Just this morning during my subway commute when I was getting off at my final train to walk a few blocks to work, a very tall and lanky guy came through the turnstile without paying (not one of the fancy new high tech turnstiles -- just the old ones that make up the majority of the NYC subway system). He used a technique that was new to me. Instead of hopping over the turnstile (which I see literally every day when I'm riding on the subway), he pulled the turnstile rotating arms back a bit, sashayed around the gap, and then left the turnstile. He did it so quickly that it actually looked like he had legitimately paid. There were cops standing just to the side of the turnstile, and even they didn't notice what he'd done. There's always a way!

 
 Posted:   Apr 19, 2024 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

Haha! I bet the cops were saying to themselves, “If we went after…”

 
 Posted:   Apr 19, 2024 - 6:31 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

The prevalent attitude in the U.S. (well, here in southern California, at least, where I've lived all my life) is that public transportation is basically an accommodation for people who can't afford a car. Unless one lives in a major Metropolitan area, relying on public modes of transportation simply isn't practical.

Of course, in the city of San Diego, we don't even have subway systems like other Metropolitan areas as our downtown area is very small (like 12 square blocks), while San Diego County is quite expansive (4,260.9 sq mi / 11,036 km2) with extreme topographical variations (coast --> inland valleys --> mountains --> deserts) and a trolley system that extends only from downtown to some of the larger inland valley suburbs (and down the coast to the Mexican border).

I haven't ridden on a bus since I was a small child on a novelty ride into the city with my great-grandma (1910-1995), who never in her life bothered to obtain a drivers license or learn how to drive a car, but I do occasionally drive down to the suburbs and hop a trolley into downtown San Diego, since parking there is very limited (and expensive).

As I mentioned previously, it's practically impossible to rely solely on public transportation in the USA, since it's so massive and cities and towns are so far apart. For example, in the small, rural town where I live now, in the mountains of San Diego County (we get snow here, believe it or not), there is one bus that passes through town each Friday. One bus, only on Fridays. If I had to take the bus from my town to downtown San Diego, it would take about 4-5 hours one way (compared to 90 minutes or less by car), and I wouldn't be able to catch a bus home until the following Friday.

But on the rare occasion I do take the trolley, I usually pay the fare. big grin

 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2024 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)

I don't imagine they jump the turnstiles in Japan. The people have more of an honor system. Also many countries have high speed rails. The US is so far behind the times.

 
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