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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: Film Score Friday 1/13/23 by Scott Bettencourt
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 3:00 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

Re: the Fabelmans

I beg forgiveness but during the film scenes with Sammy's movies shown I noticed that during his western movie the score to Magnificent Seven was used. In another I think I heard the music from Ben-Hur and others I could not recognize.

Perhaps someone else on this website saw the film and can help me out. Hey Dogplant help

I am chagrined I could not recognize the others.

Only saw it once and as usual I will watch Mr. Spielberg's movie more times then that.



 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

Re: the Fabelmans

I beg forgiveness but during the film scenes with Sammy's movies shown I noticed that during his western movie the score to Magnificent Seven was used. In another I think I heard the music from Ben-Hur and others I could not recognize.

Perhaps someone else on this website saw the film and can help me out. Hey Dogplant help

I am chagrined I could not recognize the others.

Only saw it once and as usual I will watch Mr. Spielberg's movie more times then that.


Magnificent Seven was definitely used - which I noticed particularly because when that scene took place (early 1960s), Bernstein's M7 music was not yet actually available on LP (it would not be released until the Return of the Seven LP in 1966, a few years after when that scene was set). I suspect there was at least one person involved with the production nerdy enough to notice that, but obviously it's the kind of minor detail that only people on this site would care about.

Captain From Castile is also heard, possibly during the scene of the beach party movie.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

Re: the Fabelmans

I beg forgiveness but during the film scenes with Sammy's movies shown I noticed that during his western movie the score to Magnificent Seven was used. In another I think I heard the music from Ben-Hur and others I could not recognize.

Perhaps someone else on this website saw the film and can help me out. Hey Dogplant help

I am chagrined I could not recognize the others.

Only saw it once and as usual I will watch Mr. Spielberg's movie more times then that.


Magnificent Seven was definitely used - which I noticed particularly because when that scene took place (early 1960s), Bernstein's M7 music was not yet actually available on LP (it would not be released until the Return of the Seven LP in 1966, a few years after when that scene was set). I suspect there was at least one person involved with the production nerdy enough to notice that, but obviously it's the kind of minor detail that only people on this site would care about.

Captain From Castile is also heard, possibly during the scene of the beach party movie.


Yes, Captain From Castile was absolutely used in his beach party movie, I recall humming along with that music while sitting in the theater and sad when it was cut short!

Regarding the Mag 7 score, I also had the same realization, that the score wasn't available on LP at all during its release so it wouldn't have been possible for Sammy to own it, not until 1966 with the Return of the Mag 7 LP recording. But it didn't at all ruin my utter enjoyment of hearing this music used in this context and enjoyment of The Fabelmans overall! Maybe... was Mag 7 aired on broadcast TV at all in the early 60's? Could be that Sammy used his reel-to-reel recording device to record the music from a TV broadcast?

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Here are the film music source cues – not including folk songs, classical repertoire, and pop songs – as they are listed in "The Fablemans" end credits:

"The Greatest Show on Earth" by Victor Young, Ned Washington
'Overland Stage' from "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" by Cyril Mockridge
"The Magnificent Seven" by Elmer Bernstein
'Buffalo Stampede' and 'This is the West' from "How the West Was Won" by Alfred Newman
'Ethan Returns' from "The Searchers" by Max Steiner
'Raw-Hide' by Fred Lincoln Wray Jr. and Milton Grant
'Captain from Castile Suite' from "Captain from Castile" by Alfred Newman

From memory, not all of these accompany Sammy's films (I believe "Greatest Show" and "Valance" were diegetic to Sammy's cinema experiences) but I enjoyed the whimsical way they showed Sammy with his LP turntable and reel-to-reel tape deck tucked in beside his projector. An amusing nod to any wannabe filmmaker who has struggled to bring home-made epics to life.

For anyone that missed it, Spielberg gave a terrific encapsulation of his musical tastes, sharing 'the soundtrack of his life' with BBC Desert Island Discs journalist Lauren Laverne, at the link below (43 minutes, expires Sunday, Jan. 15):

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m001g8m4

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)

Check out the non-chronological release of films in the dreadful EMPIRE OF LIGHT.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   mark.bagby.19   (Member)

Here are the film music source cues – not including folk songs, classical repertoire, and pop songs – as they are listed in "The Fablemans" end credits:

"The Greatest Show on Earth" by Victor Young, Ned Washington
'Overland Stage' from "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" by Cyril Mockridge
"The Magnificent Seven" by Elmer Bernstein
'Buffalo Stampede' and 'This is the West' from "How the West Was Won" by Alfred Newman
'Ethan Returns' from "The Searchers" by Max Steiner
'Raw-Hide' by Fred Lincoln Wray Jr. and Milton Grant
'Captain from Castile Suite' from "Captain from Castile" by Alfred Newman

From memory, not all of these accompany Sammy's films (I believe "Greatest Show" and "Valance" were diegetic to Sammy's cinema experiences) but I enjoyed the whimsical way they showed Sammy with his LP turntable and reel-to-reel tape deck tucked in beside his projector. An amusing nod to any wannabe filmmaker who has struggled to bring home-made epics to life.



This is correct. Magnificent Seven was used for Fabelman's Western screening; How the West Was Won cues underscore his war movie; and the Conquest March from Captain from Castile is the concluding slow motion race sequence at his senior class movie screening. Ethan Returns, I think, was used briefly near the end of the film when Fabelman meets a certain noted director of Westerns.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

Check out the non-chronological release of films in the dreadful EMPIRE OF LIGHT.

At first I thought it was just because of some films getting released in the UK much later than in the US, but by the end the timing seemed pretty random, or at least scheduled for dramatic impact as opposed to reality (for example, I suspect BEING THERE, released in the U.S. at the very end of 1979, would not be playing in the UK in mid-late 1981.)

I did like hearing John Morris' ELEPHANT MAN theme playing faintly in the background in one scene, presumably from the auditorium.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 7:06 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

I haven't seen THE FABELMANS yet, so I haven't heard the specific MAGNIFICENT SEVEN track used in the picture. While it's (amazingly) true that there was no MAGNIFICENT SEVEN soundtrack LP, the main title was included on a very popular United Artists LP anthology of movie hits of the day, (EXODUS, et al). Might that be the track utilized in FABELMANS?

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 7:14 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)


At first I thought it was just because of some films getting released in the UK much later than in the US, but by the end the timing seemed pretty random, or at least scheduled for dramatic impact as opposed to reality (for example, I suspect BEING THERE, released in the U.S. at the very end of 1979, would not be playing in the UK in mid-late 1981.)


Forty years ago, movies played for a LOT longer in cinemas, and the theater in Empire Of Light was clearly a second-run one that had seen better days (with an entire third floor left boarded up and unused). Go read the Arts section for a newspaper from the early 80s, and you'll often see movies showing at specific theaters years after the fact.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 8:11 PM   
 By:   NSBulk   (Member)

Magnificent Seven was definitely used - which I noticed particularly because when that scene took place (early 1960s), Bernstein's M7 music was not yet actually available on LP (it would not be released until the Return of the Seven LP in 1966, a few years after when that scene was set). I suspect there was at least one person involved with the production nerdy enough to notice that, but obviously it's the kind of minor detail that only people on this site would care about.

Perhaps a movie that establishes it's opening as January 10, 1952 and then follows it up with a scene showing houses decorated with Christmas lights and discussions of Hanukkah presents isn't that interested in real world chronology. smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2023 - 8:53 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)



Perhaps a movie that establishes it's opening on January 10, 1952 and then follows it up with a scene showing houses decorated with Christmas lights and discussions of Hanukkah presents isn't that interested in real world chronology. smile


A lot of people keep their Christmas lights up until the end of January.

 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2023 - 12:48 AM   
 By:   No Respectable Gentleman   (Member)


At first I thought it was just because of some films getting released in the UK much later than in the US, but by the end the timing seemed pretty random, or at least scheduled for dramatic impact as opposed to reality (for example, I suspect BEING THERE, released in the U.S. at the very end of 1979, would not be playing in the UK in mid-late 1981.)


Forty years ago, movies played for a LOT longer in cinemas, and the theater in Empire Of Light was clearly a second-run one that had seen better days (with an entire third floor left boarded up and unused). Go read the Arts section for a newspaper from the early 80s, and you'll often see movies showing at specific theaters years after the fact.


I'd marked as the most flagrant example CHARIOTS OF FIRE, which I remembered as coming out at the end of 1981. However, I see on IMDb that it premiered in Britain six months earlier, so my mistake. Still think EMPIRE OF LIGHT is Sam Mendes' worst film by a long shot.

 
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