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 Posted:   Aug 8, 2021 - 4:47 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Before I go into that piece of George Antheil's oeuvre, let me ask you a question about two mystery tracks I'm in doubt that Antheil wrote them. Maybe it's even the same piece that I've cut earlier to avoid dialogue etc.

It's source music for a jazz dance band.

Does anybody know by chance who actually composed these two pieces of music?


Mystery track 1

https://soundcloud.com/user-815459524/not-as-a-stranger-1955-jazz-source-1


Mystery track 2

https://soundcloud.com/user-815459524/not-as-a-stranger-1955-jazz-source-2

 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2021 - 3:45 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

I think I can replay to my own question now.

After relistening to both sections, rewatching the respective film scenes, and listening to an obscure Frank Sinatra song called "Not as a stranger" I'm pretty sure these two numbers are different arrangements of that Sinatra song written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Buddy Kaye in 1955.




The song was obviously intended for the film but wasn't featured in it.
What's there in the actual film is a typical 1950's pop band arrangement, an instrumental source track prominently put on a record and on repeat playing by the Gloria Grahame character, as well as those two 'mystery tracks' performed 'live' in a later dance & drink scene.

I suppose the, in my view, very mediocre Sinatra song just didn't fit in and was considered as too intrusive, so they chose an instrumental arrangement instead. - I doubt that the uncredited orchestrator of Antheil's dramatic score, Ernest Gold, arranged those pieces.

So, that music is not Antheil's.

What do you think?


Here's the film trailer featuring snippets of Antheil's own dramatic score:

 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2021 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

“Not as a Stranger” is a 1955 American film noir drama film produced and directed by Stanley Kramer, with Olivia de Havilland and Robert Mitchum in leading roles, also starring are Frank Sinatra, Charles Bickford, Gloria Grahame, and, Broderick Crawford. The supporting cast includes Myron McCormick, Lon Chaney, Jr., Jesse White, Harry Morgan, and, Lee Marvin. There was a such a boisterous atmosphere on this shoot, that Robert Mitchum described it as “not so much a cast as a brewery!”

The film is based on the 1954 novel of the same name by Morton Thompson. The romantic melodrama novel was widely popular, topping that year's list of bestselling novels in the United States.

“Not as a Stranger” made 1.8 million. It was highest grossing film for UA that year. Even with this all-star cast this film is rarely seen, addressing several controversial themes including medical ethics, class struggles in education, antisemitism, infidelity, divorce and more. Something that modern viewers may find hard to watch are smoking doctors – not to mention the frequent drinking of alcohol. But that was more than common in the 1950's.

Synopsis: “An ego-driven, aspiring physician, intolerant of the weaknesses of others, especially those closest to him, comes to grips with his own imperfections.”

This film was Kramer's directorial debut. He hired George Antheil to score his picture. Antheil was no stranger to Kramer as he had previously composed two scores for other Kramer productions, “The Sniper” (1952) and “The Juggler” (1953). – It is interesting to note that Dimitri Tiomkin had previously scored the vast majority of Stanley Kramer’s numerous high profile film productions including the acclaimed “High Noon” classic.

George Antheil composed a very melodramatic film score for “Not as a Stranger”, and, it was one of his longest compositions for a film up to that time. Ernest Gold orchestrated Antheil’s music, and, Paul Sawtell conducted the orchestra. The music remains unreleased on record.

Interestingly, there’s a homonymous song written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Buddy Kaye. Frank Sinatra recorded the song “Not as a Stranger”, and it was released on the B side of the single “How Could You Do A Thing Like That To Me” (Capitol Records – F3130; there are various releases of that single). Nelson Riddle led his orchestra. – This lesser known Sinatra song was later reissued on LP and CD. The number was obviously not a big hit, and Sinatra’s recording not even being heard in the film. But Antheil had snippets of the song’s melody very sparsely incorporated into his own score. – Most likely, he was requested to do so. – The most prominent position of that theme in Kramer's film occurs during the second half. There you can listen to a longer arrangement for dance band (even though this piece is not written by George Antheil, it is included in Suite III of "Not as a Stranger"). – Also note that this theme song was performed in January 1955 on TV – half a year before the film’s premiere – by Andy Williams in the Steve Allen Show. But there is more, Bernadine Read recorded her own rendition with Percy Faith and his Orchestra, and other recording artists of this song include Joe Valino, Russell Arms and Darryl Stewart. Even Henri René recorded his instrumental version of the song. The releases of Sinatra, Read-Faith, Valino and Arms are furthermore interesting as they all make reference to Stanley Kramer’s film.


Suite I (with main titles and love scene) - the video contains small portions of dialogue and some sound effects:





======================

See also these George Antheil topics:

BALLET MECANIQUE (1924) - Score & Concert Music
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144905

George Antheil, Cecil B. De Mille & Boris Morros – UNION PACIFIC (1939) – The rejected score
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144656

ANGELS OVER BROADWAY (aka BEFORE I DIE) (1940)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144770

SPECTER OF THE ROSE (1946)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144602

THAT BRENNAN GIRL aka TOUGH GIRL (1946/1951) - also presenting some clips from other Antheil scores
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144512

WE WERE STRANGERS (1949)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144944

HOUSE BY THE RIVER (1950)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144679

THE SNIPER (1952)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145107

THE JUGGLER (1953)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144559

JESSIE JAMES' WOMEN (1954) - Film Song “CARELESS LOVER” performed by Lita Baron
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=144708

HUNTERS OF THE DEEP (1954)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145484

THE PRIDE AND THE PASSION (1957) – 2009 discussion concerning a possible rerecording
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=59888

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (1957-1966) – 20TH CENTURY WITH MIKE WALLACE (1994-2005)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145267

Jerome Moross on George Antheil (1979 Interview) – ONCE IN A BLUE MOON (1935)
https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=145177

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2021 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Very informative thread on a very underappreciated film composer. Thanks for posting it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 9, 2021 - 4:19 PM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Thank you, cody1949.

Generally, Antheil's film music is certainly overlooked for many decades now with the exception of Pride and the Passion.
Maybe Chandos will look into Antheil's film music oeuvre one day.
They've already recorded 3 CDs presenting some of his symphonic works.
But would it sell to more than maybe 200 people?



Here is Suite II (contains minor dialogue and some sound effects):

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2021 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Suite III (with finale and end titles, contains minor dialogue and sound effects)





Here's Jimmy Van Heusen/Buddy Kaye's theme song as performed by Bernadine Read with Percy Faith & his orchestra.
It shows that the song works better with this singer than with Sinatra's kind of voice.
But the number as such remains a mediocre piece of work in my view, especially the lyrics.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2021 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

That it would sell fewer than a few hundred copies is unfortunely true. The kiddies who collect soundtracks these days would prefer the music (actually noise) from something like Barf, The Monster That Devoured Camden,N.J.smile

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2021 - 8:12 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

That it would sell fewer than a few hundred copies is unfortunely true. The kiddies who collect soundtracks these days would prefer the music (actually noise) from something like Barf, The Monster That Devoured Camden,N.J.smile


A great problem to appreciate Antheil's film music is the fact, that the recordings of his original scores no longer exist and what's there is not sounding that good either because it's quite old and only in mono. His music should be heard at least in stereophonic sound.

A new recording of some of his best film music as suites would be a revelation for many who are oblivious to the man's film music outpout.

 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2021 - 10:52 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Here are two examples of how Antheil chose to score scenes, respectively not to use any music:


"Typhus"




"Gentlemen, this is a corpse"




Andy Williams sings the song "Not among the strangers"
The Steve Allen Show - January 1955

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2021 - 11:29 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

It is interesting to note that Dimitri Tiomkin had previously scored the vast majority of Stanley Kramer’s numerous high profile film productions including the acclaimed “High Noon” classic.


According to an 8 September 1954 Hollywood Reporter news item, Dimitri Tiomkin was originally set to write and direct the music score for NOT AS A STRANGER, but dropped out due to “conflicting commitments."

James Van Heusen and Buddy Kaye are credited onscreen with the song "Not As a Stranger."

 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2021 - 5:30 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

Thanks, Bob, for that info.

Another "what ifs" here...

I'm sure Tiomkin would have delivered a better theme song.
Tiomkin never returned to another Kramer production after that schedule conflict.


The Andy Williams date on TV, Jan. 55 - I must say I don't buy it that he performed that song this early, half a year before the film's release.

I've asked the youtuber who uploaded the video if the date is really correct.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2021 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Thanks, Bob, for that info.

Another "what ifs" here...

I'm sure Tiomkin would have delivered a better theme song.
Tiomkin never returned to another Kramer production after that schedule conflict.


Stanley Kramer must have been very pleased with George Antheil's score that George Antheil's score for THE PRIDE AND THE PASSION came next. No one could complain about that result.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2021 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The Andy Williams date on TV, Jan. 55 - I must say I don't buy it that he performed that song this early, half a year before the film's release.

I've asked the youtuber who uploaded the video if the date is really correct.



AFAIK, the only show that Steve Allen had on the air in 1955 was "The Tonight Show." Andy Williams was a frequent guest on "The Steve Allen Show," a primetime show that Allen had on NBC on Sunday nights. But that show didn't premiere until 24 June 1956.

Another clue that Williams didn't sing the song on television in January 1955 is that the song wasn't copyrighted until 7 March 1955.

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2021 - 2:21 AM   
 By:   Sehnsuchtshafen   (Member)

The Andy Williams date on TV, Jan. 55 - I must say I don't buy it that he performed that song this early, half a year before the film's release.

I've asked the youtuber who uploaded the video if the date is really correct.



AFAIK, the only show that Steve Allen had on the air in 1955 was "The Tonight Show." Andy Williams was a frequent guest on "The Steve Allen Show," a primetime show that Allen had on NBC on Sunday nights. But that show didn't premiere until 24 June 1956.

Another clue that Williams didn't sing the song on television in January 1955 is that the song wasn't copyrighted until 7 March 1955.




The youtuber who uploaded the video hasn't responded yet.

But I think it must have been "The Tonight Show" in June 1955 as you said.

I also find it peculiar that Andy Williams sang the theme on TV but apparently had no record released of that song as far as I know (no such data to be found on discogs anyway).

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2021 - 12:32 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

But I think it must have been "The Tonight Show" in June 1955 as you said.


I didn't suggest that date, but it's as good a guess as any. Andy Williams was a regular on "The Tonight Show" with Steve Allen, appearing on more than 275 episodes between 1955 and 1957. He could have sung it on any one of them, after about March 1955 when the song was copyrighted.

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2021 - 2:03 PM   
 By:   panphoto   (Member)

“This film was Kramer's directorial debut. He hired George Antheil to score his picture. Antheil was no stranger to Kramer as he had previously composed two scores for other Kramer productions, “The Sniper” (1952) and “The Juggler” (1953). – It is interesting to note that Dimitri Tiomkin had previously scored the vast majority of Stanley Kramer’s numerous high profile film productions including the acclaimed “High Noon” classic"

Thanks for posting this - very interesting. BTW, it was Fred Zinnemann that directed 'High Noon', but I'm sure you knew that.

 
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