Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2021 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Excluding re-recordings, one.

No one should really need more than one, and it continues to baffle me why people keep the redundant issues. Buying a new one with more music/better sound/whatever to replace the old one? Sure. But why keep the old one?
I *kinda* understand when one is an 'album' with unique tracks or whatever, but like, when I see people show their Superman The Movie collection of like the original CD, the Rhino, the FSM box and the LLL I can't even comprehend the reasoning.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2021 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   Jurassic T. Park   (Member)

Excluding re-recordings, one.

No one should really need more than one, and it continues to baffle me why people keep the redundant issues. Buying a new one with more music/better sound/whatever to replace the old one? Sure. But why keep the old one?
I *kinda* understand when one is an 'album' with unique tracks or whatever, but like, when I see people show their Superman The Movie collection of like the original CD, the Rhino, the FSM box and the LLL I can't even comprehend the reasoning.


For me it all stems from archiving. Like, I trust that Die Hard has been competently put together, but I can't verify for certain that every note from that first Varese release was replicated and remastered on subsequent releases.

Plus it's just commitment - I happily bought that first Die Hard release and appreciated it at the time. It had value. Getting an expanded version doesn't take the value away, it's just another addition to the family.

And why not keep all the different versions of the album booklets?!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2021 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   Jurassic T. Park   (Member)

But that's an informal social contract that can be broken over time. Let's say for example that Varese had these Matrix elements and could have released them on 2-discs back in 2010... that would make me think they're shady and untrustworthy.

I'm sure that for most of their older Deluxe Editions Varese could have included the complete score (The Omen, The Final Conflict, Poltergeist II, Justine...) I don't think I'd describe them as shady and untrustworthy for not doing so; it was a different time when "Deluxe Edition" merely meant "expanded", not necessarily "complete". Goldsmith himself was also still alive and I've heard he nixed cues from some expanded releases he had input on, like the Omen expansions. Other composers do that too (Christopher Young and David Shire are often opposed to complete and chronological presentations of their scores).

Also, the Varese Deluxe Matrix from 2008 was not even close to the complete score, much further than say the old Deluxe Edition of The Omen was (missing about six minutes). It was merely everything they could fit on a single disc. If you look at this spreadsheet you'll see that the previously unreleased cues total between 12-13 minutes, but there's even more music premiering here than that because both the OST and 2008 Deluxe Edition had tons of micro-edited cues which were shorter than the versions as recorded for the film. All of those cues are now here untruncated. I'll be curious to see how the final running times compare, but for now here's a comparison document:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1a6O7S8txNoETkuSihPuOBZfFCQEtdaVStJBBUZ4xWZg/edit#gid=0

Yavar


Thanks for the googledoc! And it's a good set of points you make about the composers themselves not wanting to release certain cues and the market itself shifting.

My perception is the market expectations have now shifted pretty clearly to "COMPLETE" releases (I'd say they've always kind of been there), especially with the wonderful Williams and Goldsmith releases by LLL and Intrada respectively that include the complete score + alternates + album versions.

Those are pretty much the gold standards now IMO.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2021 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Note: I used Jerry Goldsmith as an example because of his perennial popularity (who am I kidding, he has no peers), but any composer will do.



I agree with this statement; he has no peers. There are some who aren’t as good, there are some better, but none was his exact equal.

My answer would involve one of the latter, as I’ve bought The Good, the Bad and the Ugly four times that I remember. The original LP, the equivalent CD, the expanded edition, the three-disc set. I’ve also had the film on dvd and Blu-ray.

Once Upon a Time in the West may be close behind, with the LP, CD, 50th anniversary CD in a wooden box, dvd and Blu-ray.

Of other composers (again from the latter of the two categories above in my opinion) I’ve had OHMSS on LP, cd, expanded cd, video, dvd and Blu-ray.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2021 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)


How many iterations are enough for you?




I bought David Arnold's Enough once ... once is enough.

As for iterations ... could you please repeat that? I didn't quite get the whole thing its first time around. big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2021 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

If you are talking about very old recordings, sometimes you can justify having two versions.

For example, I have two editions of RCA's Duke Ellington Blanton/Webster band set.

One has lots of noise reduction, the other has little if any. I find that neither set is ideal, and some tracks sound better on one set than they do the other.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2021 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...