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 Posted:   Apr 6, 2021 - 6:48 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Tuesday Trivia: The photo below depicts the earliest examples of Godzilla music on CD, released in late 1986. All four albums started out as LPs in the early 80s, and interestingly, none of them contain original film cues. The two "Godzilla Legend Chronology" volumes present synthesizer arrangements of Showa-era themes, not only from Godzilla films but related monster flicks as well. The bottom left CD features the 1983 concert premiere of Akira Ifukube's "Symphonic Fantasia", a presentation of his most famous kaiju themes in three movements. The final CD, "Ostinato" consists of re-recordings of Toho monster themes, initially commissioned to accompany a video of Toho outtakes.

All of these CDs have since been repressed and/or reissued in various forms, but the curious attribute of these first editions is their flexible plastic, adhesive-backed obi's.




Nice trivia there! I don't think many know about that. I sure hope some are familiar with the albums at least.

 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2021 - 6:54 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Complete Recordings 9 arrived this morning. It's in beautiful condition too! I tried to take a photo of the back side, but my phone's camera went screwy with the light settings.


 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2021 - 7:27 PM   
 By:   increbula   (Member)

It's quite possible I confused the sonosheet as an LP release at one point. LOL! I've always been curious as to what is exactly on the sonosheet. There's actually one listed at Yahoo Japan Auction for $5.


The sonosheet has one audio track, about 6 1/2 minutes long. It starts out with what sounds like a strummed Spanish guitar, followed by brief excerpts from "Storm", "Volcano" and most (if not all) of the other cues from the score. A female Japanese voice occasionally talks over the music, presumably to entice the listener into visiting the exhibit.

Below is a photo of the sonosheet and its sleeve, as well as the larger program booklet and envelope.




And here is a more detailed scan of the sonosheet.




 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2021 - 7:37 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

It's quite possible I confused the sonosheet as an LP release at one point. LOL! I've always been curious as to what is exactly on the sonosheet. There's actually one listed at Yahoo Japan Auction for $5.


The sonosheet has one audio track, about 6 1/2 minutes long. It starts out with what sounds like a strummed Spanish guitar, followed by brief excerpts from "Storm", "Volcano" and most (if not all) of the other cues from the score. A female Japanese voice occasionally talks over the music, presumably to entice the listener into visiting the exhibit.

Below is a photo of the sonosheet and its sleeve, as well as the larger program booklet and envelope.




And here is a more detailed scan of the sonosheet.




Thanks for the information! It sounds (and looks) wonderful.

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2021 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

These beauties have arrived! I'm more than thrilled to now have them in my collection.


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2021 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Comment removed because previous post was removed.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2021 - 1:05 AM   
 By:   Ifukube   (Member)

These beauties have arrived! I'm more than thrilled to now have them in my collection.




Nice pick ups! I no longer have the Terror of Mechagodzilla Futureland CD, but I always liked that front poster art a lot!

I just think it's a very cool, and now an extremely rare Godzilla soundtrack CD - this one doesn't show up too much anymore.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2021 - 2:22 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Nice pick ups! I no longer have the Terror of Mechagodzilla Futureland CD, but I always liked that front poster art a lot!

I just think it's a very cool, and now an extremely rare Godzilla soundtrack CD - this one doesn't show up too much anymore.



Thanks! Come to think of it, I too don't see that particular album pop up all that much. Many of the Godzilla Complete Works Collection albums show up quite often, but that particular one not so much.

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2021 - 12:31 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

A bit of an update for those interested. My copy of Toho Music's Osaka Castle Story Original Soundtrack (TMSA-001) has shipped from Arksquare. I also have Columbia Sound Treasure Series: Treasure Island Original Soundtrack (COCX-40581-2) on the way.

In addition, I placed an offer for the following items:

Complete Recordings: Akira Ifukube Special Effects Film Music Toho Edition 2 (LD25-5035·36)
Godzilla Complete Works Collection 18 - Godzilla VS King Ghidorah (TYCY-5362)
Complete Recordings: Akira Ifukube Special Effects Film Music Toho Edition 11 - Godzilla vs. Destroyer (TYCY-5469·70)

I placed the offer for the original issue of Complete Recordings 2 in hopes to replace the copy I once had. After placing my offer for Complete recordings 11 (which is still sealed), I realized that it's a sample/not for sale copy after translating the sticker on the back of the album. Hopefully the offers for all three are accepted.


Update: The seller accepted my offers. The three albums are now mine!

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2021 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   increbula   (Member)

The seller accepted my offers. The three albums are now mine!

Nice work - you're racking up some choice rarities!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2021 - 12:04 AM   
 By:   Ifukube   (Member)

A bit of an update for those interested. My copy of Toho Music's Osaka Castle Story Original Soundtrack (TMSA-001) has shipped from Arksquare. I also have Columbia Sound Treasure Series: Treasure Island Original Soundtrack (COCX-40581-2) on the way.

Glad that you picked up Toho Music's Osaka Castle CD, I also have that one and discovered that Akira Ifukube's "Super X III" march from Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, originated on his Oaska Castle score - it's on the Toho Music CD, in a much slower and more plodding version!

 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2021 - 3:52 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

The seller accepted my offers. The three albums are now mine!

Nice work - you're racking up some choice rarities!



Thanks! I'm certainly doing my best to get as much as I can while I have the opportunities to do so. I'm thankful to be replacing the original issue of Complete Recordings 2, as I thought I'd never be able to replace it.

Speaking of the original Complete Recordings issues, the release dates are an enigma. Some sources state that most were released in 1987, while the back of the albums list release dates between 1988 - 1989. I'm sure the latter is accurate though. It also doesn't help that most of them have a 1987 phonographic copyright printed on the discs themselves (probably when the tapes were transferred and the albums being produced).

 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2021 - 3:58 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Glad that you picked up Toho Music's Osaka Castle CD, I also have that one and discovered that Akira Ifukube's "Super X III" march from Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, originated on his Oaska Castle score - it's on the Toho Music CD, in a much slower and more plodding version!


Yeah, me too!

Ifukube actually used that march in earlier films and productions. The earliest case I currently know of is likely the 1953 production of "The Humpbacked Pony" (it's certainly in the 1975 version). The earliest film I remember hearing it in is "Dobu" (1954). The film also has other material from "The Humpbacked Pony", including what would be the used as first portion of the march in "The Mysterians". Speaking of which, the earliest I've heard that portion was in "Swift Current", a 1952 Toho film starring Toshiro Mifune.

 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2021 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   increbula   (Member)

Speaking of the original Complete Recordings issues, the release dates are an enigma. Some sources state that most were released in 1987, while the back of the albums list release dates between 1988 - 1989. I'm sure the latter is accurate though. It also doesn't help that most of them have a 1987 phonographic copyright printed on the discs themselves (probably when the tapes were transferred and the albums being produced).


Actually, most of the Complete Recordings set was released in 1987. The first four volumes were released on April 22nd, the next four came out on May 25th, and the Daiei (Majin) volume was released on November 25th. Only the Toei-Doga volume was released in 1988 (January 25th).

Many Japanese CDs show more than one date on their packaging. The earlier date is the release date and the second date represents the cutoff before rentals are permitted (Japan is one of the few countries where CD rental is legal), which is usually a year after the release date. To add to the confusion, between 1984 and 1990 (in come cases, as late as 1993), many Japanese CDs used a letter rather than a number to represent the year of release. These letters were based on the phrase "NIHON RECORD" (taken from "Nippon Rekodo Kyokai", The Recording Industry Association in Japan). That's why the "Complete Recordings" series shows "O" for 1987 and "R" for 1988. The letter "X" indicates the rental ban cutoff date, so "X~89-1-24", which appears on the Toei-Doga volume (the only one that shows the year 1989), means that rentals were banned until January 24th, 1989.

You can read more details about Japanese release dates on these links:
https://reference.discogs.com/wiki/japanese-release-dates
https://sanremo-co.blogspot.com/2012/05/bit-knowledge-about-japanese-cds-date.html

 
 Posted:   Apr 13, 2021 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Actually, most of the Complete Recordings set was released in 1987. The first four volumes were released on April 22nd, the next four came out on May 25th, and the Daiei (Majin) volume was released on November 25th. Only the Toei-Doga volume was released in 1988 (January 25th).

Many Japanese CDs show more than one date on their packaging. The earlier date is the release date and the second date represents the cutoff before rentals are permitted (Japan is one of the few countries where CD rental is legal). To add to the confusion, between 1984 and 1993 many Japanese CDs used a letter rather than a number to represent the year of release. These letters are based on the phrase "NIHON RECORD". That's why the "Complete Recordings" series shows "O" for 1987 and "R" for 1988. The letter "X" indicates the rental cutoff date, so "X~89-1-24", which appears on the Toei-Doga volume (the only one that shows the year 1989), means that rentals were allowed after January 24th, 1989.

You can read more details about Japanese release dates on these links:
https://reference.discogs.com/wiki/japanese-release-dates
https://sanremo-co.blogspot.com/2012/05/bit-knowledge-about-japanese-cds-date.html



Yeah, I do recall that Japanese labels used that weird system at that point. I've always had the feeling most of the Complete Recordings albums were actually released in 1987. In fact, my old blog post (while I'll finally be able to proper update) for Complete Recordings 2 has it listed being released in 1987. Discogs list them being released in 1988, but they clearly used the rental prohibition cutoff date now that I think of it. LOL! That and the fact the prohibition cutoff date was listed before the release date confused me for a bit until you reminded me of that odd system. I'm surprised I forgot about it, since I'm pretty attuned to the copyright and other symbols Japanese albums use. I actually have the RIAJ PDF files covering the symbols used and what they mean.

 
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