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 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Ok.

Poutine.

Never heard of it and I've been to my sister's in Canada in '73, '77, '80, '89, and '05. But it's just chips and gravy with bits of cheese thrown on, yes?

We in the north of England sometimes get ridiculed for putting gravy on chips (french fries).

Molasses kisses/Halloween Kisses. Is this just not what we call bonfire toffee? Except it looks like the North American stuff might be chewy and ours is brittle.

Someone please clarify! This is a crossover with at least one other thread...

And btw, I love pumpkin pie. With all the commercialism surrounding Halloween now in the UK (never happened in my day!, we were lucky to have a hollowed out swede and a bit of apple bobbing), I would have thought this delicacy might have arrived by now in our stores to sit alongside our other bonfire night favourite (especially in the north), the ginger cake known as parkin.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   mstrox   (Member)

Kisses are not brittle - sometimes they are soft and sticky to the paper, and sometimes they are a bit harder, probably from age, but still chewy.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Bonfire toffee in the UK is usually made with molasses, which I believe the biggest (at one time ) sugar co. termed it black treacle on their tins. And they still do.

But the toffee (not taffy here) is not made with much more than that and water, and comes out brittle, but great to suck. If you pardon the phrase matron! Sorry. The Carry On thread and all...

Yeah. Once upon a time we all had little bonfires and fireworks in our own gardens, and then we graduated to communal ones (various safety reasons, not too unfair to be honest). Obviously some still have their own.

But food-wise it's basically pie and peas (the mushy ones we have in the north), jacket potatoes, parkin, and bonfire toffee to suck on while we watch all the fun. Usually in the freezing cold, and often drizzle (light rain but annoying when it's cold).

Halloween is so recent to the UK that the average UK senior citizen doesn't have a clue what all the fuss is about. So no point in doing anything about it with my old dears in the home. Pumpkin pie would get a right old 'what the hell....'. I've been trying to sell that one since I started working at my mother-in-law's restaurant in the 80s with zero success.

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 2:47 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

What are you guys doing this Halloween? This is my second favorite time of the year, I love Halloween. I'm just going to stay home and watch horror films. Maybe I'll leave some candy outside for the kids, I don't really care if one of them takes it all.

Hope they aren't those videos from other regions. Remember the region warning I told you about on the X-FILES videos. In fact....

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 4:25 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

What are you guys doing this Halloween? This is my second favorite time of the year, I love Halloween. I'm just going to stay home and watch horror films. Maybe I'll leave some candy outside for the kids, I don't really care if one of them takes it all.

Hope they aren't those videos from other regions. Remember the region warning I told you about on the X-FILES videos. In fact....



Hi Last Child! Don't worry, I learned my lesson!smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 30, 2020 - 7:30 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I watched The Nightmare Before Christmas for the first time ever tonight.

How come you guys never told me before how great Elfman's tunes are in this, especially "What's This?"

 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2020 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   ryanpaquet   (Member)

Ok.

Poutine.

Never heard of it and I've been to my sister's in Canada in '73, '77, '80, '89, and '05. But it's just chips and gravy with bits of cheese thrown on, yes?

We in the north of England sometimes get ridiculed for putting gravy on chips (french fries).


Sorry for the delayed reply. poutine is really a French Canadian creation and it's nothing special really. It's usually made with BEEF gravy, and CHEESE CURDS specifically. However, all over Canada a lot of places offer poutine using other cheese, usually pizza places trying to make an extra buck.

I made mine with homemade oven roasted fries, cheese curds and a herbed vegetarian gravy. Enjoyed it very much. I still was unsuccessful in findings Halloween kisses. The Canadian chain "Bulk Barn" is usually my go to, when I went on Saturday they explained they did not get any Hallowwen candy this year in Ottawa because of the Covid restrictions. Next year!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2020 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Literally only hours after Ryan first mentioned it, I was able to grab some molasses kisses from the Dollarama and I'm having a jolly time slowly polishing them off.
I just hated having to go into the Dollarama to get them, though.
But they had a lot of them--not very well-loved by the masses--so, more for me!

Same with the poutine--but at least I could get them from a drive-thru.
I hadn't had any in ages and I forgot how salty they were.
Oh well, you just drink a ton of water afterwards!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2020 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Well, chips and gravy I get pretty often. If we here have any kind of meat pie, and have chips with it we're going to have gravy on there. And usually MUSHY peas. And on November the 5th, Bonfire Night, we have pie and (mushy) peas as a staple, with mint sauce of course. Jacket potatoes are traditional too, and maybe hot dogs or actual British banger sausages in buns with fried/griddled onions.

Bonfire toffee. This has now become something that we can get ready bagged up in supermarkets and chewy. But for the real deal, it's make your own, or track down a 'traditional sweet shop' (these days often found in touristy sites) where they still do the old fashioned big jars full of sweets/candy, from which we buy a quarter pound or so. There we can still find local-ish brands of straight forward brittle bonfire toffee. Only this time of year.

Halloween. Almost forgot! Ended up being able to squeeze on House of Frankenstein before bedtime in front of the wife! Managed to persuade her it was tame as The Munsters while she was on her iPad. Wonderful. Karloff! Chaney! J Carroll Naish the hunchback! Glenn Strange as The Monster! John Carradine as Dracula! And Hans J Salter's incredible score.

One of my favourite ever films from childhood when I was able to stay up on Friday nights and saw this together with it's sequel, House of Dracula. It could possibly be (HoF) be the very first 'horror' film I ever saw..


 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2020 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Not strictly horror but i watched...




 
 
 Posted:   Nov 2, 2020 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

We ended up just cruising Netflix for a bit and then decided on something called "Happy Death Day".
It was slight and inconsequential but not without a certain charm, and I enjoyed it for what it was.
I liked that it was self-aware enough that it gave a shoutout-wink to "Groundhog Day" at the end.

 
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