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 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Well, there must be a thread devoted to this film - probably started by me - but the Google machine produces only threads about Komeda's score.

So, here we go.

Last night, Ms. Birri and I watched for the umpteenth time this masterpiece of supernatural/psychological horror as part of our yearly Halloween film binge.

I'll try to avoid spoilers, but who hasn't seen this film by now?

I still believe that this film is a contender for the scariest film ever made. It is incredible that the protagonist is in New York City, but is completely isolated. Everything feels claustrophobic. John Cassavetes, whom I adore, plays an absolutely despicable character.

We pick up on new little details each time we see the film.

We have also wondered if the film is intended as a wry commentary on motherhood and societal expectations of women, at least mid-century societal expectations of women.

And, of course, there is Komeda's score.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)



We pick up on new little details each time we see the film.



That goes for my wife and I too, and it's the case with many Polanski films. We've seen ROSEMARY'S BABY perhaps twenty times together, and each viewing shows it to be somewhat different, as if we're viewing it from a slightly different perspective each time. I suppose that could be said of any film, or any piece of art. We change and evolve (some of us anyway) so we're not the same people when revisiting a place. But in the case of ROSEMARY'S BABY it's the wealth of tiny little details (as you said, Onya) which makes it a wonderfully rich film. Some of these details go unseen on the first viewings, but they take on increasing meaning and importance on subsequent visits. A truly brilliant film.

There was a thread years ago about Polanski's films. I would include three of them in my Top 20 films of all time. ROSEMARY'S BABY would be there, but even better is REPULSION. And the best of all is CUL-DE-SAC, which is hilarious and emotionally devastating at the same time. I think CUL-DE-SAC is the best film ever made, and Donald Pleasence's performance one of the greatest pieces of screen acting I've ever seen.

I enjoy THE TENANT a lot too, but it's marred by some horrendous dubbing of some secondary characters. His first full-length movie, KNIFE IN THE WATER is excellent as well. I could watch all of those films twenty or thirty times, and in fact have probably done so.

For some reason I don't "get" CHINATOWN at all, or any of his later, more anonymous movies.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Did you also know that William Fraker held the cameras for Conrad Hall on THE OUTER LIMITS episodes?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 7:57 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)



We pick up on new little details each time we see the film.



That goes for my wife and I too, and it's the case with many Polanski films. We've seen ROSEMARY'S BABY perhaps twenty times together, and each viewing shows it to be somewhat different, as if we're viewing it from a slightly different perspective each time. I suppose that could be said of any film, or any piece of art. We change and evolve (some of us anyway) so we're not the same people when revisiting a place. But in the case of ROSEMARY'S BABY it's the wealth of tiny little details (as you said, Onya) which makes it a wonderfully rich film. Some of these details go unseen on the first viewings, but they take on increasing meaning and importance on subsequent visits. A truly brilliant film.

There was a thread years ago about Polanski's films. I would include three of them in my Top 20 films of all time. ROSEMARY'S BABY would be there, but even better is REPULSION. And the best of all is CUL-DE-SAC, which is hilarious and emotionally devastating at the same time. I think CUL-DE-SAC is the best film ever made, and Donald Pleasence's performance one of the greatest pieces of screen acting I've ever seen.

I enjoy THE TENANT a lot too, but it's marred by some horrendous dubbing of some secondary characters. His first full-length movie, KNIFE IN THE WATER is excellent as well. I could watch all of those films twenty or thirty times, and in fact have probably done so.

For some reason I don't "get" CHINATOWN at all, or any of his later, more anonymous movies.


As I mentioned in our chat yesterday, I love "Knife in the Water." I need to give "Cul-de-Sac" another chance. I remember it being difficult viewing, but I suppose that is the point. Sometime after October 31, as we are still in Halloween mode.

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Ahh the cheeseman.


See cheese thread

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I was also struck by how much Mia Farrow sounds like Jackie Kennedy.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

The bald guy with the big nose is in a Monkees episode, in which he plays a music publisher interested in a Mike Nesmith song.

His name is Phil Leeds.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 8:06 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

I never saw Rosemary's Baby or Chinatown when they were released. I did catch up with Chinatown a few years ago, & it seemed a bit slow. I will give Rosemary's Baby a try, as TCM (UK) are showing it on Halloween & I've set the recorder.

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Never seen RB? Ruth Gordon owns that picture - that's Ruth Gordon's Baby. Her interpretation absolutely nails annoying neighbors from Hell!

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Then there's The Ninth Gate, brilliant in its own way. Frank Langella's self-crowning Wizard Of Oz towards the end is one of the funniest moments of flat-earther/fake moon-landing conspiracy nut jobs making contact with their moment of truth ever.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Never seen RB? Ruth Gordon owns that picture - that's Ruth Gordon's Baby. Her interpretation absolutely nails annoying neighbors from Hell!



"This is encouraging!" she says. She made her first movie in 1915, and wins and Oscar in 1969!

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2020 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

But that was so 'last century,' when the idea of racing headlong to MAD was so 'next century.' Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.

 
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