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 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Wasn't sure were this thread was going based off of the title. wink

I was going to say Star Wars (77) but I can go back to the Lost In Space pilot and Star Trek The Doomsday Machine. Reruns of Godzilla on Saturday afternoons as well as Saturday morning cartoon music.

Star Wars (77) was when I started to purposely listen to the soundtrack while watching a film. After Star Wars I would take note of the composer for a film and see a film based on who the composer was.

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

I watched BATMAN (1966) in first run, but I was too young to take conscious note of the music. The show was all one piece, created perfect, and everything about it was just as it should be. To go back and hear those cues now, I'm surprised at how genuinely good they are. I was a smart kid!

My full awareness must have started with John Williams' LOST IN SPACE material when I was eight and watching after school reruns. Within a year I was lapping up the episode scores from STAR TREK as well.

By the time THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE and THE SIX MILLION DOLLAR MAN came along, I was an old pro at soaking up the music. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2020 - 8:34 AM   
 By:   shureman   (Member)

Early theatre experience: Stanley Wilson's main title swirling strings for the Republic serial FLYING DISCMAN FROM MARS (and Republic serial music in general for the era 1946-1950)...
Early TV experience: the catchy background melodies of Joe DeNat's KRAZY KAT and SCRAPPY cartoons for Charles Mintz. Can still hum most of them now...

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2020 - 5:40 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm always impressed that so many of you were mere kids when you got into soundtracks. For me, it was a gradual evolution. First years were kiddie records, then I got hooked on my dad's old pop and rock music (mostly cassettes he gave to me, that he had taped off of his own and friends' LPs), mostly prog rock. Then I got into instrumental electronic music and 'easy' orchestral music, like "LSO Plays Classic Rock" and that kind of stuff. Only then, at age 13 or thereabouts, was I ready to tackle the complexity that is score albums. But I have the impression that many of you were 4-5-6 years old. A bunch of protegées! big grin

Speaking only for myself, when I was first discovering TV music as a young child, the only other choices were things I disliked: Disco, country, hard rock, and teen wankers like the Bay City Rollers. I never liked "kiddie" music, or music made expressly for children, so the refreshing sounds of Oliver Nelson and, dare I say it, Star Wars, were perfect for a weird kid like me.

 
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