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 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Did Joe Mannix have difficulty getting medical, auto, and property insurance coverage? After all, Joe was frequently beaten, shot, and driven off many a mountain road.

Joe himself says that insurance companies are in the "risk business", which gives this viewer the impression that Our Favorite Armenian-American didn't seem to mind the trials and tribulations that befell his action-packed career of choice.

Hey Phelps, it was only a show. It was a fantasy. It wasn't real!

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 9:33 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

In literally every other season of MANNIX is an episode in which one of the soldiers in Joe Mannix's Korean War outfit seeks revenge against Mannix.

This begs the question: Was Joe Mannix the "Major Reisman" of a "Dirty Dozen"-style combat unit, all of who are psychopathic killers? Only Joe's LAPD buddy, Lt. Art Malcolm (played by the great Ward Wood), bucks that trend.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

The bigger question for me is how, regardless of the severity or anatomical location of the injury, the result is always a tiny band-aid on Mannix's forehead.

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

All I know of MANNIX is that it's Cliff Booth's favorite TV show in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (a film, though, which is not Phelps' favorite).

Also, who is the twirling girl in the opening credits? Was that scene ever in an actual episode?

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2020 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Also, who is the twirling girl in the opening credits? Was that scene ever in an actual episode?

The twirling girl in the opening credits, along with the also-iconic "Mannix injured by burned toast" scene, does not appear in any actual episode.

Here's something from the other, "proper", Mannix thread that I feel "gets" the appeal of the series:

“After all...who's out there reading these old TV reviews, anyway? Is it all the Pendleton shirts-and-sandals kids who drive around in their hot rods listening to their "hey, baby!" jazz music, hanging out at the malt shop discussing Archer and Justified? Is it the young, crew-cutted technocrats with their slide rulers and rocket fuel tabulating machines, arguing over Tosh.0?

“Is it that college girl on summer break down the street who knows exactly what she's doing to all the guys in the neighborhood when she keeps insisting on washing her new Camaro in her string bikini? Hell, no; they wouldn't know Joe Mannix if he slammed into them with his customized Challenger 360.”

“No, Mannix the show, Mannix the gestalt, Mannix the lifestyle, is strictly for the over 35-set who grew up with aerials on their roofs, nylon underwear, metal lunch boxes, and only three TV networks.

“We already know what Mannix is all about. It's about TV's vision of the American "good life" in whacked-out, sun-bleached SoCal, circa 1974: Motor City muscle cars smashing into each other with abandon; weekend fishing trips that inevitably lead to assassination attempts; polyester sports jackets strong enough to deflect a .38 caliber bullet; women--beautiful women--who are attracted to macho Armenian musk like moths to a flame; old Army/college/casual acquaintance/passers-by on the street, all of whom bear a psychotic, violent grudge against Joe, and of course, vicious daily assaults, perpetrated year after year upon the unyielding body of Joe Mannix--assaults that would cripple a normal man inside a week. That's what Mannix is all about, kids. The particulars of the plots are merely distractions."


https://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/55698/mannix-the-seventh-season/

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2020 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Seeing as I've watched Mannix many times over the past 12 years, and have been immersed in season 8 all week (only 6 more episodes to go), I love that this great show always manages to surprise me with something new--like how Star Trek does for you people.

Anyway, there are an "alarming" number of S8 episodes in which Joe Mannix pours himself a triple Scotch from a lovely-looking crystal decanter by his office desk before, during, and after a case. It is often done for comic relief, or at least as comic as Mannix ever got, or as a way for the character to vent off steam or express grief--not very healthy in this, the most perfect of all possible worlds.

...but then Joe Mannix was one wry (rye?) guy, and he never claimed to be perfect, like all of today's television characters.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2020 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

By the time of Mannix season 8, Mike Connors reportedly earned $40,000 per episode, or about $210,000 per episode in 2020 money.

 
 Posted:   Sep 10, 2020 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

All I know of MANNIX is that it's Cliff Booth's favorite TV show in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (a film, though, which is not Phelps' favorite).

Since its "spotlight" in Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood, has Mannix become "all the rage" with the kids who love The Tarantino?

 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2020 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Excerpt from The WaPo article, "Mannix was the Man", which IMO led to Mannix finally getting a DVD release:

"Mannix was the last of a certain type of American manhood, circa early '70s. He wore a tie and a wistful smile. He did not know doubt but was a friend of irony. He didn't worry about giving women "their space," and he wasn't "in touch with his feelings." He was kind to small dogs, little old ladies, and femmes fatales in deep trouble and short skirts.

"He drove too fast, drank too much and smoked like he got paid for it. He slugged people and shot guys and never got pulled in by the cops.

"Mannix was great, just great -- one of the last unapologetically masculine and completely unrealistic American icons, at least in the myths we tell ourselves on television. Cops and detectives got cute or complicated later on, and there really hasn't been much on television like it since."

"It debuted at a turbulent time in American culture, 1967, and Joe Mannix was pretty much a modernized Lone Ranger -- no wife, no kids, no pets, no political views, no close friends. He was hip enough to listen to jazz and to mock himself as "a hard- boiled detective in the classical tradition," but traditional enough to wear a coat and tie and to have good manners."

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

MANNIX teaches the viewer many things--about life, love, and every subject in between.

1) The desert is a terrifying place and Joe Mannix will be stranded there--several times.

(Many) more to follow.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 1:54 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Something not mentioned here yet: your memory must be slipping from all those drugs and mind games the bad guys pulled on you, but you seem to have forgotten that you yourself handed Frank Wayne his subpena in front of the Intertec building, a building your team would visit several times in later episodes.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Something not mentioned here yet: your memory must be slipping from all those drugs and mind games the bad guys pulled on you, but you seem to have forgotten that you yourself handed Frank Wayne his subpena in front of the Intertec building, a building your team would visit several times in later episodes.

D.S.


Surely you mean Intertect. smile

Joe Mannix had a great upstairs apartment above his office. Too bad that spacious, swingin' pad of his was only seen in a handful of episodes. I'll have to make a note of every time it is seen. I last saw it in S7's "Sing a Song for Murder."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Surely you mean Intertect.

Sorry, I'm still in shock over that beautiful 1957 Ford blowing up. Nevertheless, it is the IntertecT-building. I wonder if Joe or Lou were looking on as Wayne was being squeezed. Would have been a fun crossover.

Joe Mannix had a great upstairs apartment above his office. Too bad that spacious, swingin' pad of his was only seen in a handful of episodes. I'll have to make a note of every time it is seen. I last saw it in S7's "Sing a Song for Murder."

Currently watching S1episodes on the Youtube "Mannix Official" but no pad over his office, just his extremely messy office.
For the amount of punches Mannix' teeth survive without any issues, his teeth are stronger than Jaws'.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Currently watching S1episodes on the Youtube "Mannix Official" but no pad over his office, just his extremely messy office.

For the amount of punches Mannix' teeth survive without any issues, his teeth are stronger than Jaws'.


In S1, Mannix has that "ranch"-style house which was entirely too large for the solitary detective.

So far, S7 has two consecutive episodes featuring the upstairs apartment--a series rarity. The episode itself, "Search in the Dark", is a seriously f_cked up episode with characters at the end of their proverbial rope. Victor Buono has been dogging my steps this week, as I saw him in Hawaii Five-O's "The $100,000 Nickel" (S6) and in "Search in the Dark."

One of the (many) things that made Mannix a truly great series was its playing everything with a straight face--no "comedy" episodes and very few comedic moments.

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2020 - 3:25 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

S7's "Walk a Double Line", an otherwise average episode suddenly becomes a lot more interesting in its final 15 minutes. Marie Windsor, a film noir goddess and scene-stealing performer who could sizzle in most any scene in which she appeared plays a "merry widow." Windsor exudes more charm, wit, and sex appeal than most actresses her junior. She even gets to reference the old, fedora-wearing detective trope when she meets Joe Mannix, who is wearing a peach turtleneck and plaid, pumpkin-orange sport coat.

This episode also features the underrated and extremely gorgeous Hildy Brooks.

Take that, "Another zooba Random Star Trek TOS post"!

 
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