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 Posted:   Aug 1, 2020 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

“Albert” (John Savage), a deranged psychopath, is released from prison, in spite of the head psychiatrist “Dr. Sachs’” (John Saxon’s) repeated warnings that he has a KILLING OBSESSION. True to form, he sets out in search of "Annie" (Kimberly Chase) the then 11-year-old daughter of the woman he murdered twenty years earlier.

Paul Leder wrote and directed this 1994 thriller, which went directly to video. Dana Walden provided the unreleased score.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2020 - 4:51 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Other than his main character of "Freddy" appearing in all of the NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET films, Wes Craven's involvement with the franchise had been limited to collaborating on the screenplay for the third installment (A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 3: DREAM WARRIORS). With the series seemingly ended in 1991 with the sixth film (FREDDY'S DEAD: THE FINAL NIGHTMARE), Craven waited a suitable interval, then in 1994 came back with WES CRAVEN'S NEW NIGHTMARE, which he wrote and directed. The premise of the film is that the "Nightmare" movies had generated an evil force which, once liberated by Freddy's death, was set free to haunt the nightmares of the people involved in making the movies. They would include Craven himself; Heather Langenkamp, who was a teenager in the first movie and is now a young mother; Robert Englund, who plays Freddy; John Saxon, who appeared in the first and third films as” Lt. Thompson;” and even Robert Shaye, founder and president of New Line Cinema, which produced the series.

Heather Langenkamp and John Saxon in WES CRAVEN'S NEW NIGHTMARE



Before making NEW NIGHTMARE, Craven watched all of the ELM STREET films. By the time he was finished, he claimed that he could not follow the story line at all. He further regarded the sequels to be weak compared to his original film. In NEW NIGHTMARE, Freddy is depicted much closer to what Craven had originally intended for the character--much more menacing, much less comical, with an updated attire and appearance. Just as Craven's former wife once played a nurse in one of his films, the junior nurse at the hospital in NEW NIGHTMARE is played by Craven's daughter, Jessica Craven. The film was another small success, grossing $17.4 million in the U.S. on an $8 million budget. J. Peter Robinson's score was issued by Milan at the time of the film's release.


 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2020 - 12:02 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In the made-for-television biopic LIZ: THE ELIZABETH TAYLOR STORY, John Saxon portrayed director Richard Brooks. Elizabeth Taylor (played by Sherilyn Fenn in the film) had worked with Brooks on two films: THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS (1954) and CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF (1958).

Kevin Connor directed the film, which aired in two parts on NBC beginning on 21 May 1995. Ken Thorne provided the unreleased score.


 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2020 - 11:53 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In the Robert Rodriguez action horror thriller FROM DUSK TILL DAWN, two criminal brothers (George Clooney and Quentin Tarantino) and their hostages unknowingly seek temporary refuge in an establishment populated by vampires, with chaotic results. John Saxon plays FBI Agent “Stanley Chase” in the film.

William Sadler had originally been cast as Stanley Chase, but left the production for reasons unknown. Graeme Revell's score for the 1996 film had two tracks on the Epic Soundtrax CD.


 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2020 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

FROM DUSK TO DAWN would prove to be John Saxon’s last major film appearance. Although he would appear in film projects for another two decades, they were primarily direct-to-video fare, or so little-seen as to be nearly invisible.

Born Carmine Orrico on August 5, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Italian-American parents, John Saxon was fluent in Italian, and made a number of films in Italy that never saw U.S. release. He was constantly working, with nearly 200 roles in the movies and on television in a career that stretched over seven decades. Rarely the leading man, John Saxopn was always a reliable cop, villain, or partner. Thanks John.





with Sandra Dee


in POSSE FROM HELL


in THE PLUNDERERS


with Anjanette Comer in THE APPALOOSA


with Bruce Lee


in STRANGE NEW WORLD (1975)




with Sandra Dee over the years




John Saxon in ENTER THE DRAGON

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2020 - 10:49 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

FROM DUSK TO DAWN would prove to be John Saxon’s last major film appearance. Although he would appear in film projects for another two decades, they were primarily direct-to-video fare, or so little-seen as to be nearly invisible.

Born Carmine Orrico on August 5, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Italian-American parents, John Saxon was fluent in Italian, and made a number of films in Italy that never saw U.S. release. He was constantly working, with nearly 200 roles in the movies and on television in a career that stretched over seven decades. Rarely the leading man, John Saxopn was always a reliable cop, villain, or partner. Thanks John.





with Sandra Dee


in POSSE FROM HELL


in THE PLUNDERERS


with Anjanette Comer in THE APPALOOSA


with Bruce Lee


in STRANGE NEW WORLD (1975)




with Sandra Dee over the years




John Saxon in ENTER THE DRAGON


With that face , charm and honest acting style, John Saxon always was leading man . His longevity was impressive - he aged remarkably well .. few have careers that last over six decades in show business. RIP.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2020 - 4:44 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I never knew he went back so far.

It was in those "Earth" movies and Enter The Dragon for which he comes to mind, for me. I shall never be able to forget Diana Muldaur wielding her 'dink' whip and lashing the poor hapless rogues with it's pitiless sting. That comedic 'shoe on the other foot' line is all the more priceless now. I just can't help thinking "rinky dink Dink," every time I see it. RIP.

 
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