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 Posted:   Jun 28, 2020 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)



My last TCM recommendation for the month is a highly atmospheric but less artistically accomplished motion picture: John Huston's Reflections in a Golden Eye. The performances from its superbly chosen cast genuinely convey their characters' turbulent emotions making this an engrossing film-watching experience. It is one of my TOP TEN Guilty Treasures

http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2013/7/4/guilty-treasures?fbclid=IwAR1_d4FoZw3pwrhmZJsfrWQkyMrY60aV5Kl3Tsz0Bc2OVvt_d7SJ6M-21rU#Reflections-in-a-Golden-Eye

a previous TCM recommendation here

http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2015/9/8/now-listen-to-me#Reflections-in-a-Golden-Eye=

and is worth eyeing Sunday, June 28 at 3pm PST.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Arthur, I did watch this. Your write up helped me understand a lot of the movie. Here are my random thoughts.

I can't say that I really enjoyed this movie, but I think it was important at the time as we watch the tragedy of pent up sexuality. I could not stand Zorro David or Anacleto's character. He just drove me batty. Yes, I see the function of this character, but he was just too quirky for me. I felt Taylor was okay but campy. Maybe that was her role.

Brando was great. He perfectly embodied his repressed homosexuality. The movie did a fine job of reflecting images and symbols of this issue. Brian Keith was also wonderful as was Julie Harris. I think the acting is the best part of the movie.

I'd like to point out one scene that I found particularly effective. Of course, one scene was the whipping of the horse. One powerhouse but subtle scene came near the end. I won't black this out so don't read if you don't want to read a spoiler. Brandon had a terrible crush on the private played by Robert Forster. He didn't know the private snuck into his wife's room each night for various reasons that I won't spell out. Almost at the end, Brandon finally sees the private sneak into his house, so he goes back to his room and brushes through his hair with his fingers to make him appear more attractive. That hair touching was a subtle move. And then came the ending when Brando realized he was not the object of the private's affection.

I should add the Baby Ruth wrapper was also powerful.

Not sure I got the meaning of the title.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I seem to remember reading Goldman's novelisation of Marathon Man, first. After that, I could never forget Scylla The Rock. I think the only reference was via the frenchman in the film itself. Then there's Babe's obsession with vindicating his and Doc's father's suicide, one of the more complex issues residing within the nail-biter (if you've got good teeth) that was the rest of the film.

I think Hoffman made for a rather older student, however, that goal of keeping his father's memory alive, while Doc couldn't be bothered with the old man's legacy, provides the fulcrum between the difference with the two brothers. It culminates with Babe's emergence from the shadows having seen his brother's side and the idealism that came before. In the end, we don't really know how Babe has been tarnished by the experience. We can only hope it makes him stronger.

As for Michael Small's score - it was a brilliant moulding to the imagery of the film itself and completely captured the ambience surrounding it. I took note, but never imagined the score would ever enter the realm of personal ownership. It remains one of the great mystery thriller scores out there. Lovely closing titles music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Grecchus, I am totally confused. I'm not sure how your comments about Marathon Man relate to Reflections in a Golden Eye. Am I missing something?

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 8:16 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Grecchus, I am totally confused. I'm not sure how your comments about Marathon Man relate to Reflections in a Golden Eye. Am I missing something?

Hi Joan, it's in Arthur's list of films and since I've never seen RIAGE, I thought I'd page some of the main ideas that immediately come to mind with respect to Marathon Man, which to me is basically underlining a kind of malaise that existed even then within the USA - the apparently simple ideal of the American Dream actually being dominated by a complex web of inner deceit and disillusionment that comes out of pure capitalist intent. The idea that everything is for sale.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Okay, Grecchus, I get it now. Also, I really did enjoy your insights into Marathon Man, a film that I greatly admire. Thanks.

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2020 - 9:31 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I've noticed that you are always the first to answer Arthur's postings, Joan, and TBH that guarantees I'll jump in to take a look-see at the points of discussion. There are usually several films strung together at the same time and I have access to the DvDs for Dirty Harry and Strange Cargo, the latter of which I have not yet seen. Chuck Clark's comments about Diry Harry were very amusing.

My father has many film books concerning Hollywood and it's litany of stars, however, there is no reference with quite the scale of the internet itself. A lifetime of browsing simply is not enough to cover it all. Now, there's a thought?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2020 - 5:38 PM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)


Thank you both for the interest and support for my reviews and especially your added thoughts!

 
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