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 Posted:   Mar 27, 2020 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

Kino Lorber have detailed their upcoming Blu-ray release of Gordon Flemyng's film Dr. Who and The Daleks (1965), starring Peter Cushing, Roy Castle, Jennie Linden, Roberta Tovey, and Barrie Ingham. The release will be available for purchase on July 7.

Synopsis: In this feature-film version of the classic television series, the Doctor and his companions are accidentally transported to the home planet of the deadly Daleks. The planet is also home to the peaceful Thals - whom the Daleks are planning to eradicate.

Special Features and Technical Specs:
RESTORED ON BEHALF OF STUDIOCANAL
NEW Audio Commentary by Writer, Film Critic, Film Historian Kim Newman and Screenwriter, Writer, Film Historian Robert Shearman
Audio Commentary with Actresses Jennie Linden and Roberta Tovey and Author Jonathan Sothcott
Dalekmania: 57-Minute Documentary
Interview with Author Gareth Owen
Restoring Dr. Who and the Daleks
Original trailer
Optional English Subtitles

https://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=26603


Also:

DALEKS' INVASION EARTH 2150 A.D. (1966)
• NEW Audio Commentary by Writer, Film Critic, Film Historian Kim Newman and Screenwriter, Writer, Film Historian Robert Shearman
• Dalekmania: 57-Minute Documentary
• Interview with Actor Bernard Cribbins
• Interview with Author Gareth Owen
• Restoring Daleks’ Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.
• Optional English Subtitles
• Dual-Layered BD50 Disc
• Theatrical Trailer

 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2020 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I’m delighted these two classics are coming to blu and I bet they will look stunning. I know both films get a hefty amount of criticism, some people even saying Cushing is miscast. As someone who doesn’t watch the Dr Who series or have interest in it, I’ve enjoyed these two movies since I was a kid and I love Cushing in them. Thank you, Kino!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2020 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

I absolutely love these films. I saw them on release as a kid, and when the first one premiered in the UK on BBC 1, I wrote a letter to the BBC asking them to show the sequel, which they did some weeks after the first. It was a movie slot on Saturday evenings called High Adventure. Of course it was probably scheduled anyway, but when you're a little kid...

These are the actual listings..

https://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/252f321b67dd48a1904575feeb08653c

https://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/fd7be780544a4ee3a9fc8f12fbb7f410

As a Who fan myself I can honestly say that while some do pull them down, most love them. For many years they were the only versions of the first two Dalek stories fans could actually see. Before the age of home video. It helps that there aren't many Classic Series Who fans who don't already love Cushing, so to have him playing a version of our hero is a delight.

And the music's great too. Dated beyond belief but it's part of the charm. Just a shame clean masters couldn't be found for the second film though it wasn't for the lack of trying. Still what we've got on the Silva release is great.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2020 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)


And the music's great too. Dated beyond belief but it's part of the charm. Just a shame clean masters couldn't be found for the second film though it wasn't for the lack of trying. Still what we've got on the Silva release is great.


Much as I do appreciate that Silva Screen CD, I don't recall reading about anybody considering Malcolm Lockyer's score as great. Associating early '60s dance band music with Daleks makes this a candidate for the 'unfit' scores topic and I wonder why Amicus chose this approach and assigned Lockyer to the production.
Around this time period, Amicus utilized composers such as Elisabeth Lutyens or Wilfred Josephs. I'm curious what sort of idiosyncratic music Josephs might have supplied for these feature films - considering what he wrote for "The Prisoner", The Deadly Bees or Hammer's Fanatic.

Bill McGuffie also wrote for another Peter Cushing flick after the Daleks' Invasion called Corruption - another head-scratching jazzy opus to accompany dismembered body parts, a jiggly sprinting Sue Lloyd & death by laser beam.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2020 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

I’m delighted these two classics are coming to blu and I bet they will look stunning. I know both films get a hefty amount of criticism, some people even saying Cushing is miscast. As someone who doesn’t watch the Dr Who series or have interest in it, I’ve enjoyed these two movies since I was a kid and I love Cushing in them. Thank you, Kino!

Great to see there is love for these two films. I have a very VERY limited interest in DW, a few episodes of the pre-Colin Baker series, with a main interest in the Pertwee era, and that's it.
These two films are pre-established lore so they are not obliged to anything (and from what I read about the current stank fest, that doesn't care about canon either).

DW and the Daleks is an orgy of sumptuous colours and a visual feast.
Invasion Earth also has some stunning colours and it has mid 60s non-hippie England, which I love.

I have the soundtrack CD, and it is more fun than all the other DW soundtracks combined X 100.

If the BR is even richer in image, than the current normal DVD, I am very tempted to get it.

D.S.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2020 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

I definitely consider the music for both these films 'great'. As in they're favourites, not in the Herrmann and Rozsa stakes of classic art maybe. This is emotion here, in a similar way to the love for the Barry Gray music for the Gerry Anderson productions. When one has grown up with this stuff it's easy to love it.

The Gray comparison is appropriate here, and not just because he supplied sound fx for these films. They are for me Doctor Who as the UK's ITV might have approached it, in particular Gerry Anderson. So the jazzy nature of the music here is in the same area. Catchy and fun more than dramatic. Though there is some drama in both scores. The climb up the mountain in the first film, and the quieter moments in the second. But yep, most of the time it's brash. It's catchy. And it's bloody good fun.

I totally agree about the colour here. There is also the bigger production style, which is why I believe Dr Who and the Daleks was a money spinner whereas Thunderbirds Are Go was a flop. The kids were given the same stuff in the latter as they were getting on tv but in colour. Doctor Who on tv at that time was quite primitive. To see it in such a big and brash glossy way was exciting at the time.

 
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